Beef and Sheep: Managing health in the face of changing climate - Ruth Clements (FAI)

700 views
601 views

Published on

This presentation forms part of the Farming Futures workshop 'Making livestock farming fit for the future'

9th December 2009

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
700
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Beef and Sheep: Managing health in the face of changing climate - Ruth Clements (FAI)

  1. 1. Managing health in the face of  changing climate Ruth Clements
  2. 2. Challenges associated with climate  change • Economic – more people to feed, but not an  elastic demand. Pressure on cost of  production and efficiency. • Adaptation – be that cycles of change,  increased volatility or overall change. • Mitigation – what might we be required to do  to reduce the carbon footprint: – Intensify – De‐intensify – Integrated farming
  3. 3. Disease and ill health costs ... • What have been the changing direct costs in  1000 ewe sheep production at FAI linked to  changing climate patterns: – BTV vaccination = 0.60p/dose             £1,400/yr – Initial loss of sheep to fluke                 £2,500  – Subsequent increased fluke tx £348/yr – Increased use of wormers                    £331/yr – Change of product insecticide             £661/yr • Impacts on efficiency and productivity are often  difficult to quantify. Much disease is sub‐clinical.
  4. 4. Managing Animal Health The challenge is to plan and prioritise, and to keep an open mind to changes.
  5. 5. Managing health • Encouraging tolerance to disease can be very  useful. – Adaptive breeding • Managing environment and modifying husbandry  methods. • Working on optimal nutrition, particularly micro‐ nutrients. • Quantifying the current situation  – Knowing where you stand, and what the national  picture is
  6. 6. Quantifying current situation • Current production and herd/flock records: – Production parameters, disease levels, costs. • Diagnostics, ongoing monitoring and response to  change.
  7. 7. Liver Fluke at FAI – an example Kings lock River Thames Seacourt tributary Acute flooding caused by heavy rainfall. Short term effects: •Initial deaths •Stress related illness •Concurrent disease •Insufficient pasture Longer term effects: •Change in habitat •Change in plant and animal species Juncus inflexus
  8. 8. Investigation of Liver Fluke at FAI • After initial acute problem a revised plan was needed . • We first quantified the overall scale of problem. Key Factors • Water habitat • Aquatic snail host •Pasture indicators • Egg excretion • Clinical signs in animals
  9. 9. Investigation of Liver Fluke Environmental  Indicators Animal Indicators
  10. 10. Investigation of Liver Fluke
  11. 11. Fluke Health plan
  12. 12. Example – Lameness at FAI • Improvement in lameness levels at  FAI, but problem remains costly in  terms of time, meds, and welfare. • National incidence estimated at  between 6 ‐11%. • A new initiative has been developed  alongside an innovative sheep  farmer who recognised the cost of  treating lame sheep and was not  prepared to accept ill health as  normal in his flock. • A new protocol was developed  aimed a tackling lameness with a  combination of measures.
  13. 13. Foot rot and Scald Lameness Reduction programme Protocol Initial Protocol ‐ Overview • Use cull tags to identify animals badly affected by foot rot , be ruthless to begin with. Any animal treated for  moderate or severe foot rot (see lameness scoring guide) more than once in one season should be cull tagged,  and separated from the main flock at the earliest possible convenience. • Catch and treat any lame animal seen in accordance with the treatment protocol. • Run flock through 10% zinc sulphate footbath at gathering as a preventative measure and in the event of  outbreaks. • Assess handling and housing facilities and pasture to identify any particular areas likely to increase the risk of  disease transmission. Where possible modify these facilities or take remedial measures to reduce disease  transmission. • Vaccinate all breeding stock in January and June with the Footvax vaccine. Vaccinate any lambs over wintered in  January. • Quarantine all incoming stock in accordance with quarantine protocol. Identify disease and treatment history of  all replacement stock. Review buying policy. Key Elements 1.Breed for resistance – CULL 2.Encourage immunity – VACCINATE 3.Prevent spread – TREAT, MODIFY 4.Prevent Introduction ‐ QUARANTINE
  14. 14. Current programme • Initial roll out on three farms – quantification  of current problem, modification of protocol,  resolution of practical issues.
  15. 15. Lameness Health plan The challenge is to plan and prioritise, and to keep an open mind to changes.
  16. 16. Actions for the future – what can we  do? • Quantify the current situation. • Decide on production criteria and work out  how to tackle health concerns. • Operate the health plans effectively. • Use disease forecasts, and keep an open mind  to ongoing changes. • Farm vets and health professionals can help in  decision making but this needs to be a farmer  led partnership.
  17. 17. Planning for Health • Once the situation is quantified an overall  timed action plan can be determined. • Ongoing adaptation is key, system must be  easily accessible and changeable over time.

×