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Solar PV - Available Technologies and making it happen. Dr Dan Davies (Solarcentury)
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Solar PV - Available Technologies and making it happen. Dr Dan Davies (Solarcentury)

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  • Solar in the City of London - 30 Crown place
  • Solar in the City of London - 30 Crown place
  • C21e slate installs across France.
  • C21e slate, S.France
  • C21e slate installed in Stanstead
  • First London Fast Sun installation
  • Sulfercell Berlin
  • Gazeley Ontigola, Spain
  • There are 4 different technologies, monocrystalline, polycrystalline, amorphous and hybrid.
    These technologies differ in their efficiencies and appearance.
    Monocrystalline is one of the most efficient technologies requiring approximately 7square meters per kiloWatt peak. Monocrystalline cells are manufactured by extracting a single silicon crystal as an ingot. This is then solidified and finely sliced into silicon wafers or cells which have a single mono crystal apprearance. The high efficiency of monocrystalline PV makes it suitable for small surface areas where a good electrical yield is still required, for example domestic roofs.
    The offcuts from the monocrystalline cells are remelted, extracted and solidified as polycrystalline cells. These too are sliced into thin wafers and have a multi crystal apprearance. Polycrystalline is slightly less efficient, requiring approximately 8 square meters per kiloWatt peak, ideal for larger surface areas where a good yield is still required, for example large cladding surfaces.
    Amorphous technology is the least efficient of the technologies requiring approximately 15-20 square meters per kiloWatt peak. Amorphous technologies do however harness a greater proportion of light wavelength compared to mono and poly crystalline technologies so they are particularly well suited to overcast skies. Amorphous PV is manufactured by depositing a fine layer of silicon onto a material suface, which could be glass, stainless steel and even plastics which are flexible and protected from vandalism. A large roof area, for example a warehouse or office buildings, can accommodate a large quantity of amorphous technology, overcoming the lower yield for a given area, but still harnessing it’s property for an increased yield in overcast weather conditions.
    The most efficient technology is hybrid, which is a combination of monocrystalline cells overlaid with an amorphous silicon layer. Hybrid technology requires approximately 6 square meters per kiloWatt peak. This makes it most suited to small surface areas where a very good electrical yield is required.
  • First double pitch Energy Roof install, in Angers, France
  • There are 4 different technologies, monocrystalline, polycrystalline, amorphous and hybrid.
    These technologies differ in their efficiencies and appearance.
    Monocrystalline is one of the most efficient technologies requiring approximately 7square meters per kiloWatt peak. Monocrystalline cells are manufactured by extracting a single silicon crystal as an ingot. This is then solidified and finely sliced into silicon wafers or cells which have a single mono crystal apprearance. The high efficiency of monocrystalline PV makes it suitable for small surface areas where a good electrical yield is still required, for example domestic roofs.
    The offcuts from the monocrystalline cells are remelted, extracted and solidified as polycrystalline cells. These too are sliced into thin wafers and have a multi crystal apprearance. Polycrystalline is slightly less efficient, requiring approximately 8 square meters per kiloWatt peak, ideal for larger surface areas where a good yield is still required, for example large cladding surfaces.
    Amorphous technology is the least efficient of the technologies requiring approximately 15-20 square meters per kiloWatt peak. Amorphous technologies do however harness a greater proportion of light wavelength compared to mono and poly crystalline technologies so they are particularly well suited to overcast skies. Amorphous PV is manufactured by depositing a fine layer of silicon onto a material suface, which could be glass, stainless steel and even plastics which are flexible and protected from vandalism. A large roof area, for example a warehouse or office buildings, can accommodate a large quantity of amorphous technology, overcoming the lower yield for a given area, but still harnessing it’s property for an increased yield in overcast weather conditions.
    The most efficient technology is hybrid, which is a combination of monocrystalline cells overlaid with an amorphous silicon layer. Hybrid technology requires approximately 6 square meters per kiloWatt peak. This makes it most suited to small surface areas where a very good electrical yield is required.
  • First double pitch Energy Roof install, in Angers, France
  • The orientation and tilt of the solar installation will make a difference to the amount of energy it produces. However, this diagram illustrates that it may not be as critical as you might have thought. The optimum position for an array in the UK is facing due South at 30 degrees. If the PV is installed on a flat roof then the yield of the system falls by about 10%. For a vertical façade the yield falls again to about 70% of the optimum for a South facing façade but even facing East or West it will still be possible to produce at least 60% of the optimum energy yield.
  • The orientation and tilt of the solar installation will make a difference to the amount of energy it produces. However, this diagram illustrates that it may not be as critical as you might have thought. The optimum position for an array in the UK is facing due South at 30 degrees. If the PV is installed on a flat roof then the yield of the system falls by about 10%. For a vertical façade the yield falls again to about 70% of the optimum for a South facing façade but even facing East or West it will still be possible to produce at least 60% of the optimum energy yield.
  • There are 4 different technologies, monocrystalline, polycrystalline, amorphous and hybrid.
    These technologies differ in their efficiencies and appearance.
    Monocrystalline is one of the most efficient technologies requiring approximately 7square meters per kiloWatt peak. Monocrystalline cells are manufactured by extracting a single silicon crystal as an ingot. This is then solidified and finely sliced into silicon wafers or cells which have a single mono crystal apprearance. The high efficiency of monocrystalline PV makes it suitable for small surface areas where a good electrical yield is still required, for example domestic roofs.
    The offcuts from the monocrystalline cells are remelted, extracted and solidified as polycrystalline cells. These too are sliced into thin wafers and have a multi crystal apprearance. Polycrystalline is slightly less efficient, requiring approximately 8 square meters per kiloWatt peak, ideal for larger surface areas where a good yield is still required, for example large cladding surfaces.
    Amorphous technology is the least efficient of the technologies requiring approximately 15-20 square meters per kiloWatt peak. Amorphous technologies do however harness a greater proportion of light wavelength compared to mono and poly crystalline technologies so they are particularly well suited to overcast skies. Amorphous PV is manufactured by depositing a fine layer of silicon onto a material suface, which could be glass, stainless steel and even plastics which are flexible and protected from vandalism. A large roof area, for example a warehouse or office buildings, can accommodate a large quantity of amorphous technology, overcoming the lower yield for a given area, but still harnessing it’s property for an increased yield in overcast weather conditions.
    The most efficient technology is hybrid, which is a combination of monocrystalline cells overlaid with an amorphous silicon layer. Hybrid technology requires approximately 6 square meters per kiloWatt peak. This makes it most suited to small surface areas where a very good electrical yield is required.
  • There are 4 different technologies, monocrystalline, polycrystalline, amorphous and hybrid.
    These technologies differ in their efficiencies and appearance.
    Monocrystalline is one of the most efficient technologies requiring approximately 7square meters per kiloWatt peak. Monocrystalline cells are manufactured by extracting a single silicon crystal as an ingot. This is then solidified and finely sliced into silicon wafers or cells which have a single mono crystal apprearance. The high efficiency of monocrystalline PV makes it suitable for small surface areas where a good electrical yield is still required, for example domestic roofs.
    The offcuts from the monocrystalline cells are remelted, extracted and solidified as polycrystalline cells. These too are sliced into thin wafers and have a multi crystal apprearance. Polycrystalline is slightly less efficient, requiring approximately 8 square meters per kiloWatt peak, ideal for larger surface areas where a good yield is still required, for example large cladding surfaces.
    Amorphous technology is the least efficient of the technologies requiring approximately 15-20 square meters per kiloWatt peak. Amorphous technologies do however harness a greater proportion of light wavelength compared to mono and poly crystalline technologies so they are particularly well suited to overcast skies. Amorphous PV is manufactured by depositing a fine layer of silicon onto a material suface, which could be glass, stainless steel and even plastics which are flexible and protected from vandalism. A large roof area, for example a warehouse or office buildings, can accommodate a large quantity of amorphous technology, overcoming the lower yield for a given area, but still harnessing it’s property for an increased yield in overcast weather conditions.
    The most efficient technology is hybrid, which is a combination of monocrystalline cells overlaid with an amorphous silicon layer. Hybrid technology requires approximately 6 square meters per kiloWatt peak. This makes it most suited to small surface areas where a very good electrical yield is required.
  • The orientation and tilt of the solar installation will make a difference to the amount of energy it produces. However, this diagram illustrates that it may not be as critical as you might have thought. The optimum position for an array in the UK is facing due South at 30 degrees. If the PV is installed on a flat roof then the yield of the system falls by about 10%. For a vertical façade the yield falls again to about 70% of the optimum for a South facing façade but even facing East or West it will still be possible to produce at least 60% of the optimum energy yield.
  • The orientation and tilt of the solar installation will make a difference to the amount of energy it produces. However, this diagram illustrates that it may not be as critical as you might have thought. The optimum position for an array in the UK is facing due South at 30 degrees. If the PV is installed on a flat roof then the yield of the system falls by about 10%. For a vertical façade the yield falls again to about 70% of the optimum for a South facing façade but even facing East or West it will still be possible to produce at least 60% of the optimum energy yield.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Providing solar technology for buildings across Europe
    • 2. Agenda • Introduction to Solarcentury • Review of PV Options • The UK Feed-in Tariff (FIT) • Financing options • Q & A
    • 3. Pan European geographical footprint
    • 4.  Founded in 1999 to accelerate the uptake of PV  Over 800 completed projects across Europe  European offices in UK, France, Spain and Italy; 120 employees  Highly experienced international engineering and project management teams  Specialists in full turnkey installations  Full O&M and remote monitoring service available  Funds to invest  Partnership with Savills  Founded in 1999 to accelerate the uptake of PV  Over 800 completed projects across Europe  European offices in UK, France, Spain and Italy; 120 employees  Highly experienced international engineering and project management teams  Specialists in full turnkey installations  Full O&M and remote monitoring service available  Funds to invest  Partnership with Savills 5 Company highlights
    • 5. Product Portfolio Industrial roofs: Car parks, free field arrays: Architectural elements: Residential roofs:
    • 6. Fastsun, Spain
    • 7. 103 kWp, Alexander Stadium, Birmingham
    • 8. Bari, Italy - 1MW ground mounted
    • 9. Product Portfolio Industrial roofs: Car parks, free field arrays: Architectural elements: Residential roofs:
    • 10. UK scheme – technologies and rates 2010 2011 2012 TERM
    • 11. Principles of UK feed-in tariff • PV system owners receive FIT for all PV generation • FIT tariffs are index linked and guaranteed for 25 years • Electricity can then be used or sold to the utility retail off set vs wholesale • Retail value of the electricity not fixed
    • 12. Principles of UK feed-in tariff G ENERATIO N IM PO RT EXPO RT
    • 13. Financing options Farmer Developer EPC Investor Utility Farmer Developer EPC O&M O&M 3rd party Investor owns system £ £££ £££ Farmer owns system Investor ?
    • 14. orientation and tilt
    • 15. Shading – horizon line drawing
    • 16. Annual variation
    • 17. Summary Wide range of technical solutions for buildings and ground mounted systems FITs make investing in solar attractive Investor, developer and installer expertise is available to help Farms and farm buildings present some of the best opportunities for adding to our renewable energy mix
    • 18. Next steps Ground mount? Suitable roof? Daniel.davies@solarcentury.com Peter.sermon@solarcentury.com Developer partner: Savills
    • 19. Case studies
    • 20. CIS Tower – Manchester, UK  Example of rain-screen PV cladding  Unique aesthetic and strong statement of environmental commitment by the Co- operative Insurance Group  Largest commercial solar façade in Europe at the time of installation in 2005  7,244 Sharp modules yield a system size of 391kWp  Cost of PV fully offset cost of tiles in which building was originally clad  Building was in full use during installation
    • 21. Tesco – Various locations, UK  Multiple systems across Tesco stores in the UK  Range of module technologies used to maximise generation at each site  Solarcentury mounting solutions allow for integration into different roof types  Full marketing support to maximise brand benefits to Tesco  Systems are remotely monitored
    • 22. Big Yellow Self Storage, UK  Systems installed to 12 stores across the country  Meets with delivery model – easy to install, reliable and low maintenance  Wins over other technologies in terms of CO2 savings  Planning is not an issue with photovoltaics – low visual impact and output predictable  Aligned with CSR plan  Systems are remotely monitored from head office
    • 23. Gazeley  Gazeley decided to become a low carbon pioneer in 2003  Solarcentury has successfully delivered 18 solar projects for Gazeley in the UK, Spain and France  Gazeley today is widely recognised as a benchmark in sustainable warehouse operations  This has helped Gazeley significantly increase the value of their building stock
    • 24. Gazeley (Invista) - San Agustin, Spain  Modular system design based on proprietary framing system  Modules angled towards sun on a flat roof  Installation time and effort minimised  System load distributed across roof  Sunpower 205W, all-black modules give the system a high aesthetic
    • 25. Modular Stations - Network Rail  A total of 33.35kWp was installed over the three stations Corby, Eastfields and Greenhithe  PV generation along with energy efficiency to reduced the sites CO2 emissions by 25%  Solarcentury worked closely with Network Rail and Corus to design and deliver these projects  Standardised design made the systems more economical  With our installation partner SEC these projects were delivered quickly
    • 26. UK Schools Project  Solarcentury has delivered PV systems to 160 UK schools, to wide acclaim within the country  The project was jointly financed by the Co-operative Insurance Group and the UK government’s Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform (BERR)  Each school received a 3.9kWp PV system and a comprehensive educational package designed by Solarcentury  The dispersed nature of the sites and variation in roof types posed a challenge for the installation  This was overcome by standardising system designs and outsourcing installation under strict quality control  We continue to work successfully with CIS and BERR
    • 27. Gazeley (Eroski) – Ontigola, Spain  BIPV system in Ontigola, Spain  New build by Gazeley for Eroski  UniSolar flexible a-Si (amorphous silicon) thin film laminates integrate fully with the membrane roof  PV laminates form the UV- proof layer of the roof  Requires neither ballast nor roof penetrations
    • 28. Procter & Gamble – Euskirchen, Germany • 94.5kWp installed at a P&G centre in Euskirchen • Installed on Solarcentury SB1400 mounting system to maximise electricity generation • Benefits from German roof- mounted PV tariff • Remote monitoring ensures maximum output • Highly efficient installation – only 18 minutes per kWp
    • 29. Milan schools Won a competitive tender by the Province of Milan to install 480kWp onto 24 schools The highly competitive tender was won due to Solarcentury’s expertise in BIPV and deep experience with the public sector Standardised system designs, a flexible project management approach and constant client liaison meant the project was installed in time and under budget All systems are remotely monitored ensuring customer peace of mind and educational value
    • 30. orientation and tilt
    • 31. Shading – horizon line drawing
    • 32. Annual variation

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