Water, Science, and Civics: Stormwater Pollution and Ecosystem Services

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Water, Science, and Civics: Stormwater Pollution and Ecosystem Services

  1. 1. Water, Science, and Civics: Stormwater Pollution and Ecosystem Services Dave Wilton www.facingthefuture.org
  2. 2. Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  3. 3. Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  4. 4. About Facing the FutureSeattle-based nonprofitfounded in 1995Interdisciplinary globalissues and sustainabilitycurriculum for K-12Over 1.5 million studentsreached annuallyAll 50 U.S. states and over120 countriesProfessional developmentand consulting www.facingthefuture.org Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  5. 5. Defining Sustainability “Meeting our own needs without limiting the ability of future generations to meet their needs” World Commission on Environment & Development, 1987 Social Well-being Sustainable Communities StrongFlourishingEnvironment Economy Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  6. 6. Unit DescriptionWater, Science, & Civics 5 water quality lessons Units for MS and HS Correlated to standards for science, social studies, sustainability education Culminating video project FREE download at www.facingthefuture.org Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  7. 7. Technology ComponentsWater, Science, & Civics Smartboard compatible Interactive online maps Data analysis Digital video Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  8. 8. Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  9. 9. Iceberg Modelfor understanding root causes and leverage points of global issues Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  10. 10. 5 Lesson UnitMake a Sound Impact1. A Sound Introduction2. Ecosystem Services3. Nonpoint Source Pollution in Puget Sound4. Town Hall Meeting5. Video Production Photo by Paul Esmond Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  11. 11. Lesson 1A Sound IntroductionGuiding Questions What different types of ecosystems comprise the Puget Sound region? How do various species rely on Puget Sound for their survival? How are we as individuals a part of the Puget Sound region? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  12. 12. Lesson 1A Sound IntroductionObjectives Students will: Recognize a variety of Puget Sound ecosystems Identify their location within the Puget Sound region, using an online mapping tool Determine how ecosystem services provided by Puget Sound support the region’s sustainability Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  13. 13. Lesson 1A Sound Introduction What do the pictures have in common? Think, pair, share with a partner Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  14. 14. Copyright © 2012, Facing the FutureCopyright © 2011, Facing the Future
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  19. 19. Copyright © 2012, Facing the FutureCopyright © 2011, Facing the Future
  20. 20. Copyright © 2012, Facing the FutureCopyright © 2011, Facing the Future
  21. 21. Copyright © 2012, Facing the FutureCopyright © 2011, Facing the Future
  22. 22. Copyright © 2012, Facing the FutureCopyright © 2011, Facing the Future
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  24. 24. Lesson 1A Sound Introduction What do the pictures have in common? Think, pair, share with a partner Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  25. 25. Lesson 1A Sound IntroductionPicture Discussion Questions What surprised you? Which images did you find most interesting? Why? When you hear the term “Puget Sound”, what images and words come to mind? What other images would you add? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  26. 26. Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  27. 27. Lesson 2Ecosystem ServicesWhat are ecosystem services?Create a list of services provided by land and water resources in the Puget Sound region.How are they linked to the region’s sustainability?Where does each service fall on the Venn diagram? Where would we be without these services Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  28. 28. Examples ofEcosystem Services Food Wetlands for water Fiber/timber purification Waterways for Shoreline boats stabilization/erosion Hydroelectric power control Flood & storm Outdoor recreation: protection hiking, camping, paddling, boating Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  29. 29. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source Pollution Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  30. 30. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source PollutionObjectives Students will: Differentiate between point and nonpoint source pollution Understand how nonpoint source pollution reaches Puget Sound through stormwater runoff Formulate research questions to investigate the issue of low dissolved oxygen in South Puget Sound Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  31. 31. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source PollutionSouth SoundDissolved OxygenStudyPublished byWashington State Departmentof Ecology, 12/08 Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future Study Area
  32. 32. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source Pollution 2004 Water Quality Assessment for dissolved oxygen (D.O.) in South Puget Sound Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  33. 33. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source Pollution Why focus on dissolved oxygen (D.O.)? Aquatic species get oxygen from the water Low levels of D.O. can stress aquatic species Dissolved Oxygen Level Impact on Salmon 9 mg/L Optimal 7-8 mg/L Acceptable 3.5-6 mg/L Poor Below 3.5 mg/L Stressful or fatal Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  34. 34. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source PollutionHow do nutrients contribute to low D.O.?•Plant growth is limited by nutrient availability. (How fertilizer makes plants grow.)•Excess nutrients (N and K) in water can cause excess growth of algae.•When the plants die, the decomposition process uses up oxygen in the water.•The result is hypoxia, or oxygen depletion. Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  35. 35. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source Pollution Which areas are most vulnerable to nitrogen inputs How can you tell from the map? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  36. 36. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source Pollution Do factors other than nutrient pollution lead to hypoxia? Why is dissolved oxygen lower: in summer months? in stagnant water? at greater depths? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  37. 37. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source PollutionWhat scientific questions would you ask todetermine how to address hypoxia?Questions being researched by the UW School ofOceanography’s ORCA program: Are human-derived nutrient inputs currently small relative to natural (physical and biological) fluxes? Will increases in nutrient inputs (eutrophication) as population and industrialization increase adversely impact water quality in South Puget Sound? What are the key factors in the cause of hypoxia in southern Hood Canal? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  38. 38. Lesson 3Nonpoint Source PollutionHow would you answer your scientific questions? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  39. 39. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingGuiding Questions How does pollution of the Puget Sound impact people, environments, and economies in the surrounding area? What are solutions to improving the health of the Puget Sound? What are pros and cons of different approaches to reducing Puget Sound pollution? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  40. 40. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingObjectives Take on perspectives of community stakeholders Understand interconnected economic, social, and environmental factors related to keeping the Puget Sound healthy Formulate realistic solutions for cleaning up or preventing Puget Sound pollution Recognize that Puget Sound pollution prevention is a multi-faceted effort that involves consideration of multiple perspectives Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  41. 41. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingApproximately how many cars, buses, andtrucks are registered to owners in PugetSound?A. 3.2 millionB. 1.1 millionC. 5.8 millionD. 8.4 million Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  42. 42. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingApproximately how many cars, buses, andtrucks are registered to owners in PugetSound?A. 3.2 millionB. 1.1 millionC. 5.8 millionD. 8.4 million Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  43. 43. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingWhen drivers of cars, buses, and trucks hit their brakes,dust grinds off the brake pad and gets washed withstormwater into water. Copper from this dust can harmfish and aquatic life. How many pounds of copper washinto Puget Sound each year through stormwater?A. 32,000 poundsB. 70,000 poundsC. 12,000 poundsD. 5,000 pounds Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  44. 44. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingWhen drivers of cars, buses, and trucks hit their brakes,dust grinds off the brake pad and gets washed withstormwater into water. Copper from this dust can harmfish and aquatic life. How many pounds of copper washinto Puget Sound each year through stormwater?A. 32,000 poundsB. 70,000 poundsC. 12,000 poundsD. 5,000 pounds Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  45. 45. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingHow many lakes, streams, and rivers inPuget Sound are impacted by poor waterquality?A. 245B. 805C. 594D. 715 Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  46. 46. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingHow many lakes, streams, and rivers inPuget Sound are impacted by poor waterquality?A. 245B. 805C. 594D. 715 Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  47. 47. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingScenario: According to the Washington Department ofEcology, there are millions of pounds of toxic pollution thatenter Puget Sound every year. A number of aquaticspecies – including fish, birds, and barnacles – havebecome endangered because of this pollution.Government officials, large companies, tribal groups,concerned citizens, and non-governmental organizationshave all been asked to attend a town hall meeting in orderto determine what next steps to take in order to protect theendangered species and to prevent other species frombecoming endangered. Your group has been asked topresent a well-articulated, compelling plan to helpdecrease pollution in the Sound. Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  48. 48. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingStakeholdersGroup 1: Association of Puget Sound TribesGroup 2: Cruise Line AssociationGroup 3: Concerned Citizens for Puget SoundGroup 4: Northwest Regional CouncilGroup 5: Oil Refineries RepresentativesGroup 6: Office of Economic Development, Seattle Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  49. 49. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingQuestions for each stakeholder group What do you think should be done to improve the health of Puget Sound? What stakeholders can support you in keeping the Sound healthy? Aside from the general public, who will benefit from this plan? What, if anything, are you willing to do to help with the management and conservation of the Sound? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  50. 50. Lesson 4Town Hall MeetingWhole Group Discussion Questions Who do you think should be responsible for decreasing the pollution in Puget Sound? Was achieving consensus and forming alliances with other groups a difficult process? Why? Are there other groups who should have attended? What is another possible approach to pollution prevention that none of the groups spoke of? What policies do you think could be created to prevent pollution from reaching the Sound? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  51. 51. Lesson 5Video Production What can we do? Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  52. 52. Lesson 5Video Production Student Action Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  53. 53. Lesson 5Video Production EPA Water Quality Video Contest http://www.epa.gov/owow_keep/videocontest.html Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  54. 54. Lesson 5Video Production Bridges to Understanding http://www.bridgesweb.org Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  55. 55. Lesson 5Video ProductionKinds of PSA formats Video: Live action with dialog, voice over, and music Digital Story: Still pictures and art with music and voice over Hybrid: Mix Video and Digital Story Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  56. 56. Lesson 5Video Contest! PSAs: The good, the bad, and the ugly Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  57. 57. How long was your shower this morning?A. 3 minutes (I’m quicker than a drill sergeant)B. 5 minutes (I’m quick but this isn’t boot camp)C. 10 minutes (Hot water is my caffeine)D. 15 minutes (It’s not my water bill)E. 0 minutes (I just rolled out of bed) Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  58. 58. I know where my drinking watercomes from. Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  59. 59. I know where my wastewatergoes. Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  60. 60. I know where our stormwatergoes. Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  61. 61. If you live in Kampala, KansasCity, Karachi, or Kyoto, do youhave access to all three of these?Clean drinking water Improved sanitation Stormwater treatment Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  62. 62. Stormwater:Solubility & Sustainability www.greenlevine.wordpress.com Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  63. 63. Classroom Example:Clean Water Challenge How is water polluted and how can it be cleaned? Learning solubility in the context of water quality Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  64. 64. “Fishing for the Future” Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  65. 65. Tragedy of the Commons Describes what can happen when a resource is owned in common but not managed in common. Concept of “The Commons” developed by biologist Garrett Hardin Commons include: Oceans Air Space Internet Public lands (e.g. National Parks) Antarctica Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  66. 66. Action ProjectCreate an advertising campaign: What kind of fish does (school, restaurant, store) serve or sell? Which fish are harvested in a sustainable manner? Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  67. 67. Curriculum ResourcesTeacher’s GuidesOver 30 free lessons availableat www.facingthefuture.org Student Textbooks Written for grades 6-12. Preview chapters available onlineCurriculum Units1-2 weeks in length. Mostfree to download online Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  68. 68. Staying Connected Visit www.facingthefuture.org Sign up for FTF e-newsletter Become a Peer Educator Contact FTF: dave@facingthefuture.org Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future
  69. 69. “We must teach our students thatthey can be architects of the future, rather than its victims.” ~ Buckminster Fuller, architect and philosopher Copyright © 2012, Facing the Future

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