Drought Alert: Water Efficient Practices for Saving Your Landscape - Texas A&M

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Drought Alert: Water Efficient Practices for Saving Your Landscape - Texas A&M

Drought Alert: Water Efficient Practices for Saving Your Landscape - Texas A&M

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  • 1. http://texashelp.tamu.edu April 2006Drought Alert:Water Efficient Practices for Saving Your LandscapeAll Plants Have a Place in a Water Efficient LandscapeEvery plant in the nursery or garden center truly has a place in a water efficient landscape. Its notwhich plant you use, but where you put it. Three different plant zones can be incorporated into awater efficient landscape: • Regular Watering Zone • Occasional Watering Zone • Natural Rainfall ZonePlants in the "Regular Watering Zone" would require watering once every week or more ONCEESTABLISHED, in the absence of rain.Plants in the "Occasional Watering Zone" would require watering once every two or three weeksONCE ESTABLISHED, in the absence of rain.Plants in the "Natural Rainfall Zone" would require only natural rainfall ONCEESTABLISHED.By zoning the plants in the landscape according to their water requirements, you prevent thesituation of having to overwater one plant type to meet the need of another.
  • 2. Every region of Texas has a pallet of plants to choose from which are adapted to the soil, temperature extremes and pest problems of the area. The challenge for the professional and amateur gardener is to categorize the plants based on expected water requirements. By using the categories of natural rainfall, occasional watering and regular watering, most gardeners can place the plants from their region into these water-use zones. For example, in much of Texas (areas of 30+ inches of rainfall), the following categorization is often used: • Regular Watering Zone: turfgrass and annual flowers • Occasional Watering Zone: perennial flowers and tender woody shrubs and vines • Natural Watering Zone: tough woody shrubs and vines and all trees All plants do have a place in a water efficient landscape. Visit your nursery or garden center today and get started on creating your own beautiful, water conserving landscape! Douglas F. Welsh, Ph.D. Professor and Extension Horticulturist Produced by Agricultural Communications, The Texas A&M University SystemEducational programs of Texas AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age or national origin. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics, Acts of Congress of May 8, 1914, asamended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. Edward G. Smith, Director, Texas AgriLife Extension, The Texas A&M University System.