AND OTHER SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS2                                     3
STACY’S REQUEST    An online search for marketing books yields 135,000,000 results. If you reviewed    each one for one se...
SORRY STACY, FORMULAS                                                    ARE FOR PHARMACISTS                              ...
BUT THIS WILL HELP                         It’s a collection of concepts, guidelines and                         rules, wh...
HOW DO I KNOW?                                                 For over twenty years I’ve helped small, and multi-bil-    ...
GROW                                                             Fear      The human tendency           OR STAND STILL    ...
‘‘                                  g             THE    “CONCERNING ALL     GROWTH  LIES IN THE HUMAN                   ‘...
2                             WORDS                               Too many business people                               d...
STRENGTHS                                          WEAKNESSES                                                             ...
2WHERE & HOW? BE SPECIFIC.Any good advertising copywriter will tell you that vague statementsare useless. SPECIFICS SELL, ...
2WHERE & HOW?WHAT GETS MEASURED, GETS DONE.Once you’ve figured out what you want to do and how you’d liketo do it, it’s th...
2 WHERE & HOW?     START TODAY                                                                                      GOAL 1...
x                                              THE ‘X’-FACTOR                                              Peter Drucker, ...
xMARKETING = INNOVATIONIT’S IN THE DNA OF EVERY BUSINESS                                                                  ...
‘‘           xREAL CREATIVE IDEAS ORIGINATEHITHER AND YON IN THE INDIVIDUALMEMBERS OF STAFF AND NO ONE CANTELL IN ADVANCE ...
xIDEAS. TRY IT FOR YOURSELFWhat improvements would you make to this can?How could you be innovative with this can?IMPROVEM...
x IDEAS COME NATURALLY. A PROCESS HELPS.History has shown that many fantastic ideas have come from employeesat all levels ...
x              YOU HAVE NO IDEA WHO WILL COME-UP WITH              A GREAT IDEA. SO HELP THEM TO HELP YOU.              EN...
xIDEAS. A MANAGEMENT TOOL.If at first, the idea is not absurd, then there is nohope for it - ALBERT EINSTEIN. An idea that...
p    POSITIONING     Be known and remembered     for something unique.                               Photo source: http://...
pPOSITIONING. YOU HAVETO BE REMEMBERED. POSITIVELY.Our brain decides what to keep and what to throw-out. It filters(A) and...
pPOSITIONING.BE UNIQUE.Your competitors have the same objective, and to help knock themout of the way or reposition them, ...
pPOSITIONING. BE UNIQUE.DEFINE YOUR UNIQUE SELLING PROPOSITIONEvery organization has the opportunity to develop and promot...
pPOSITIONING. THINK UNIQUE.                                                                                 SELF-ACTUALIZA...
50                                                                                                                        ...
p POSITIONING = EXPERIENCE                                                                                               P...
,                                                  ,, p                                                                   ...
p STAGING = A PLATFORM FOR AN EXPERIENCE                                             ENJOYMENT = A PLACE OF FUN AND SAFETY...
58                                                                                                                        ...
a         ‘‘          ADVERTISING          SAYS TO          PEOPLE,         ‘HERE’S WHAT          WE’VE GOT.          HERE...
aADVERTISING. PEOPLE WERESCRATCHING MESSAGES ON ROCKWALLS 20,000 YEARS AGO.As long as humans have been communicating, they...
a WHEN TED TURNER, THE BILLIONAIRE AND FOUNDER OF THE CABLE NEWS NETWORK CNN, WAS ASKED FOR HIS SECRET TO SUCCESS HE REPLI...
RESULTS COUNT—don’t advertise for the sake of                                                             advertising. Adv...
IF YOU HAVE ACCESS TO                                                      THESE, USE THEM TO                             ...
aADVERTISE. MAKE IT EASIER FORYOUR AUDIENCE TO READ YOURADVERTISING. YOU’LL SELL MORE.                                  SE...
aADVERTISE. TRY IT FOR YOURSELFTake one of your existing advertisements, a page from abrochure, even a powerpoint slide, a...
a                               ADVERTISE ONLINE.                               (GO BEYOND YOUR WEB SITE)                 ...
aADVERTISE. BE SOCIAL.                      There are many online marketing tools avail-                       MY STORY   ...
‘‘                      THE THOUGHTand                      OF NEGOTIATION                CAN BE INTIMIDATING,            ...
nSELLING IS NEGOTIATION.NEGOTIATION IS SELLING.                                                     American Industrialist...
nSELLING. A CRASH COURSE.If someone is dying of thirst and you have a glass of water for sale, you’renot selling, they are...
d         g=2xpand         Grow, or stand still         Two words: where & how         Innovate or be left behind         ...
‘‘                                                    SUGGESTED READING:                                                  ...
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G=2xpand Marketing Formula

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A simple marketing formula for small business owners.

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G=2xpand Marketing Formula

  1. 1. AND OTHER SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS2 3
  2. 2. STACY’S REQUEST An online search for marketing books yields 135,000,000 results. If you reviewed each one for one second, and did so for eight hours a day without hitting Starbucks for a Java Chip Frappacinno, it would take you a mere 12,240 days. Of course these aren’t all books. Still, there are a hell of a lot. So I wasn’t surprised when Stacy Dynan, a San Francisco small business owner, told me that while she’d love to grow her business, she simply didn’t have the time to source the marketing information and advice she required. “CAN YOU PROVIDE ME WITH A SHORT, EASY TO UNDERSTAND FORMULA TO HELP MAKE ME AND MY BUSINESS MORE EFFECTIVE?” Stacy Dynan Small Business Owner San Francisco4 5
  3. 3. SORRY STACY, FORMULAS ARE FOR PHARMACISTS Formulas, by definition, imply a predictable and consis- tent outcome—perfect for chemistry, rocket science, accounting and cooking. BUT NOT FOR MARKETING. Equations and mathematics cannot satisfy human requirements for variety and individualism, a few of the necessary ingredients in the selling and buying (marketing) process. If such a thing existed, we’d all have latched onto it a long time ago, delivering the same stuff with the same results. This group of symbols are a few of the components of a formula used in develop- ment economics to explain an economy’s growth rate in terms of the level of saving and productivity of capital. It suggests that there is no natural reason for an economy to have balanced growth.* SIMPLE, HUH? *The model was developed independently by Sir Roy F. Harrod and Evsey Domar. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/6 7
  4. 4. BUT THIS WILL HELP It’s a collection of concepts, guidelines and rules, which, when molded to work in conjunction, improve the odds of growing a business. Obviously there are more, but It’s hard to find any successful company where these are not given ALL YOU NEED TO plenty of attention—thanks to the fact that they’ve consistently proven, in all sorts of businesses and KNOW TO SHIFT FROM industries, as being complementary to growth. SLOW TO GROW IT’S A PERFECT PLATFORM TO SOURCE AND STUDY MORE INFORMATION, DEVELOP FRESH IDEAS AND IMPLEMENT NEW INITIATIVES. g=2xpand g — GROW, OR STAND STILL 2 — (2 WORDS) WHERE & HOW x — THE X-FACTOR = IDEAS & INNOVATION p — POSITION YOURSELF a — ADVERTISE. ADVERTISE. ADVERTISE. n — NEGOTIATE (SELL) d — DELIGHT THE HELL OUT OF PEOPLE8 9
  5. 5. HOW DO I KNOW? For over twenty years I’ve helped small, and multi-bil- lion dollar, organizations sell and market pocketknives, out-door gear, refrigerators, surgical masks, Italian furniture, newspaper advertising, beautiful homes, franchise operations, multimillion-dollar data networks and online marketing tools. Hands-on sales, marketing and busi- I’ve owned several small businesses, and have had ness experience on four continents, in roles such as VP of Global Marketing for an organiza- locations as diverse as London, Grand tion NewsWeek® Magazine ranked 5th in the world’s Rapids, Sydney, San Francisco, Frankfurt, Cape Town, Brisbane, Manila, Guangzhou, top telecommunication companies and 118th in the Helsinki, Maseru, Paris and Tokyo. world’s top 1000 global organizations. Along the way I’ve attended (and given) hundreds of marketing presentations, seminars and key-note talks—g=2xpand is a summary of a few of the things I have learned. FABIAN VENTER SAN FRANCISCO NOW LET’S GET STARTED.10 11
  6. 6. GROW Fear The human tendency OR STAND STILL Uncertainty to snap-back to what Doubt feels comfortable. GROWTH IS A BASIC DRIVER FOR ALL BUSI- NESSES. Yet it seems elusive for many small business owners. The things which FUD + HOMEOSTASIS = g got them to where they are, no longer seem enough to get them to where they want to go. They’re aware that new activities and initiatives have to be tried and executed, but you’ll often hear, “I feel stalled, nervous, and uncertain about what to do DECISION + ACTION + VMP + NEW STUFF = g next.” This is fairly normal, and common enough to have its own acronym—FUD— ‘ACTION VISION IDEAS & Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. So it’s safer DISSIPATES MISSION INNOVATION to stick with more of the same. FEAR’ PLAN Once underway, However, breaking through FUD and the experience, courage, ‘more of the same is more of the same’ training and intuition syndrome is easier said than done. take control. But to do so, the first step is to make the decision to grow and be prepared to commit to it. Without a positive decision, little is going to happen. The second step is to take action, AND TO ACT WITH PURPOSE.12 13
  7. 7. ‘‘ g THE “CONCERNING ALL GROWTH LIES IN THE HUMAN ‘‘ STRONGEST PRINCIPLE OF ACTS OF INITIATIVE (AND CREATION), THERE IS ONE CHOICE. ELEMENTARY George Elliot ACTION DISSIPATES FEAR English Novelist TRUTH THE IGNORANCE OF 1 YES UNSURE NO Do you want to growWHICH KILLS COUNTLESS IDEAS your business?AND SPLENDID PLANS: THAT THE 2 YES UNSURE NO Are you prepared toMOMENT ONE DEFINITELY COMMITS commit to doing so?ONESELF, THEN PROVIDENCE 3 YES UNSURE NO Are you ready toMOVES TOO. A WHOLE STREAM OF take action?EVENTS ISSUES FROM THE DECISION,RAISING IN ONE’S FAVOR ALL If you said no to all three, burn these notes. If unsure, I understand, but why not try anyway.MANNER OF UNFORESEEN INCIDENTS, IF YOU SAID YES TO ALL THREE, EXCELLENT,MEETINGS AND MATERIAL YOU ARE ON YOUR WAY.ASSISTANCE, WHICH NO MAN COULDHAVE DREAMT WOULDHAVE COME HIS WAY.William Hutchison MurrayQuoting from Goethe (1749-1832)regarding The 1951 ScottishHimalaya Expedition.14 15
  8. 8. 2 WORDS Too many business people don’t have a clear outline ofWHERE they want to go, or HOW to get there. This is risky busi-ness and a common barrier to growth.In reality, anyone who owns or manages a business hassome idea of where they want to take it and how to do so.However, if this is not clearly defined, not only you, but thepeople around you—employees, suppliers and stakehold-ers—will have difficulty aligning to the bigger picture. Theyneed to know where you want to go and an idea of how youwant to get there. This helps them to help you, and provides away to ensure everyone is on track.It’s therefore important that you define a VISION (WHICH ISFORWARD LOOKING) and a MISSION (DEALS WITH THE PRESENT)and share it with everyone involved in your business. THENWORK WITH YOUR PEOPLE TO TURN THESE INTO GOALS AND MERGETHEM INTO A PLAN. WHERETO DO THIS WELL, THERE ARE 3 MAJOR GUIDELINES:BE REALISTICBE SPECIFICBE MEASURABLE16 17
  9. 9. STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES Controllable personal or busi- Personal or business attri- ness attributes or elements that butes or elements that may are helpful to achieving your detract you from achieving vision (and goals) your vision (and goals) S W 2WHERE & HOW? BE REALISTIC.By all means have a large and splendid vision, but be real-istic. One way of cross-checking is to work through a SWOTanalysis, a technique credited to Albert Humphrey in the1960’s, which is used to evaluate STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES,OPPORTUNITIES and THREATS pertaining to a business venture. T OTake some time to list a few points under each heading andbeing absolutely honest, strike a balance between what’sunrealistic and what you feel is achievable. (Be sure not tolist the same opportunities or strengths available to, or thoseof your competitors. And while weaknesses and threats canseem disheartening, they can always be remedied, stopped,minimized and managed.) THREATS OPPORTUNITIES Personal or business attributes Attractive personal and busi- that may be beyond your control ness elements or opportuni- and which may place your vision ties that support the reason (and goals) at risk for your vision (and goals)18 19
  10. 10. 2WHERE & HOW? BE SPECIFIC.Any good advertising copywriter will tell you that vague statementsare useless. SPECIFICS SELL, NON-SPECIFICS DON’T. A map without streetnames, accurate distances or geographic features is of little value.When it comes to defining your Vision and Mission, it’s important to beas succinct, and specific as possible. The clearer you are about whereyou want to go and how you plan to get there, the easier it will be. Great example of a Vision and a Mission, sharedFor some reason this lesson gets lost by many organizations. Consider with customers. (Found in Tire Shop in Oregon.)the examples below: choose from (A) who you think has used thestatement as part of their corporate communication, and in example (B)match the statement to the product being manufactured and sold.See how nice and generic and vague they are? This is all too common.DON’T MAKE THIS MISTAKE. On the other hand many companies do IT IS OUR VISION TO BE THE BEST TIREprovide a clearly defined, specific vision and mission statements. STORE IN TOWN WITHIN THREE YEARS. TOBE ONE OF THESE. HELP US ACHIEVE THIS WE WILL STICK TO THE REPAIR TIME WE PROMISE YOU. WE WILL PROVIDE A CLEAN,A: “................... is committed to bringing the best personal COMFORTABLE WAITING ROOM, WITH FRESH COFFEE,computing experience to students, educators, creative profes- COOL SODAS, SOFT MUSIC, LATE EDITION MAGAZINESsionals and consumers around the world through its innovativehardware, software and internet offerings.” AND TOYS FOR CHILDREN. OUR STAFF WILL WEAR CLEANCompaq Dell Apple Toshiba Microsoft UNIFORMS WITH NAME TAGS, GREET YOU WITH A SMILE. WE WILL KEEP YOU UPDATED ON YOUR REPAIRS AND WORK ON YOUR CAR AS IF IT IS OUR OWN AND USEDB: “We are committed to maximizing stakeholder returns throughhigh standards of excellence and the delivery of the most reliable, BY OUR FAMILIES. IF WE ARE UNABLE TO PROVIDE THEcost-effective and responsive services.” SERVICE OR REPAIRS YOU REQUIRE, WE WILL HAPPILYHamburgers Neon Signs Lingerie Air-conditioners REDIRECT YOU TO A SHOP WHO CAN, AND IF REQUESTED, INSPECT THOSE REPAIRS AT NO CHARGE. WE WILL phones and mobile computing devices on earth. (B) All of themuse computers, operating systems, portable music players, mobile REASONABLY GUARANTEE OUR WORK AND PROVIDE Aprovides some of the most innovative, beautifully designed, easy to Answers: (A) The mighty Apple Corporation—a company which LOCAL EMERGENCY SERVICE 24 HOURS, 7 DAYS A WEEK.20 21
  11. 11. 2WHERE & HOW?WHAT GETS MEASURED, GETS DONE.Once you’ve figured out what you want to do and how you’d liketo do it, it’s the time to flesh out a plan which in reality is simplya series of connected goals. It stands to reason therefore, thatwithout goals you can’t have a plan. www.flickr.com/photos/cote/You’ve probably gathered by now the importance of beingspecific when it comes to your vision and mission statements;well, precisely the same applies for goals. Perhaps more so, andif you can remember this, WHAT GETS MEASURED, GETS DONE, you’rehalfway there.A simple tool used by many for goal-development is the SMARTapproach (as outlined on the adjacent page) and which is hugelybeneficial. HERE ARE THREE REASON WHY: S.M.A.R.T. GOALS YOUR GOALS MUST BE1 It requires that goals are WRITTEN. This clarifies thinking, turning intangible thoughts and desires into ‘physical statements’. SPECIFIC AND EASILY UNDERSTOOD. THEY NEED TO BE MEASURABLE,2 It captures them in such a way as to be easily MEASURED—or how else can you track their status and progress? OR HOW ELSE CAN YOU TRACK THEM? THEY SHOULD BE ACHIEVABLE,3 Finally, because they are written (documented), and specific (measurable), they are easy to DISTRIBUTE, share and discuss. This not only helps you to stay on AND REWARDING. FINALLY track, it helps those around you to provide feedback THEY NEED TO BE SET and ideas, and of course, establish their own goals to support yours. TO A TIME-FRAME.22 23
  12. 12. 2 WHERE & HOW? START TODAY GOAL 1. OUTLINE WHERE YOU WANT YOUR BUSINESS TO GO, AND HOW YOU SEE IT GETTING THERE. ADD A FEW MAJOR GOALS TO GET YOU STARTED. Complete by: MY VISION Where I want to go. (Looking forward.) GOAL 2. Complete by: GOAL 3. MY MISSION Complete by: How I am going to achieve it. (What must be done now.) GOAL 4. Complete by: GOAL 5. GOALS Ensure your goals are specific, measurable, attainable, rewarding, and set to a time-line. Establish goals for each department, or area of your business. (Such as, Finance, Sales, Marketing, Human Resources, Administration, Legal and Regulatory, Supply, Inventory, Customer Service...) Complete by:24 25
  13. 13. x THE ‘X’-FACTOR Peter Drucker, the renowned writer and management consultant, considered by many experts as the founding father of the study of management, once stated that busi- ness has only two major functions; MARKETING AND INNOVATION. photo: www.flickr.com/photos/striatic/26 27
  14. 14. xMARKETING = INNOVATIONIT’S IN THE DNA OF EVERY BUSINESS WHAT A BUSINESSIf you’re in business, you’re marketing in one way or another. CAN’T DO WITHOUTTHE AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION (AMA) defines marketing PRODUCT: A tangibleas: ‘The activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, product or an intangible service.communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that havevalue for customers, clients, partners, and society at large.’[1] PRICE: The amount a customer paysHAL VENTER explains it this way; ‘The trick is to use IDEAS, tools for a product or service, which THE X-FACTOR: is established by factors such asand resources to efficiently manage the ‘marketing mix’[2] of Ideas which competition, material costs, marketproduct, placement, pricing, and promotion[3] so as to sell to lead to share, brand, perceived value (from something the customer), supply and demand,as many people as quickly as possible, with the minimum of substantially and so on.hassle–at a reasonable profit. And to do so in a manner that each different (INNOVATION) PLACEMENT: A location, real or virtual,customer will be delighted enough with their purchase to spread and those that where a product or service can bethe word and return for more.’ [4] lead to taking purchased. something PROMOTION: The communicationINNOVATION = IDEAS which exists and making used to appeal to, attract, inform, and educate customers. ThisIT’S IN THE DNA OF EVERY EMPLOYEE it better includes major elements such as: (IMPROVEMENT)INNOVATION is commonly understood as the successful introduc- advertising, public relations, point- of-sale, word-of-mouth, etc.tion of a new product, service or process—which is substantiallydifferent—that a company can utilize to differentiate itself, grow CUSTOMER VALUE: The benefits aor successfully compete. Those which lead to making an existing customer receives (emotional andproduct, service or process better, is IMPROVEMENT. The starting functional) divided by the costs they are prepared to give up to receive thepoint for all innovation and improvements originates with ideas. benefits. (Emotional, financial, time,And ideas come from people. But no one knows when they’ll origi- energy and effort).nate, from whom, or what they’ll be. They are unique, unforeseen CREATIVITY: The unique driverand unplanned, and which all companies need. inherent in all people from which ideas[1] www.marketingpower.com/AboutAMA/ [2] The ‘marketing mix’ was a arise, often at random places, at the oddestterm introduced in 1953 by gentleman named Neil Boden. [3] The 4P’s of times, from peopleclassification, as it is widely known, was outlined in 1960 by a prominent the least expectedmarketer, E. Jerome McCathy. [4] My father’s response to my observa- to do so.tion, after spending day with him at work, that calling on prospects one ata time seemed like really hard work. He was a travelling salesman and Iwas eleven years old.28 29
  15. 15. ‘‘ xREAL CREATIVE IDEAS ORIGINATEHITHER AND YON IN THE INDIVIDUALMEMBERS OF STAFF AND NO ONE CANTELL IN ADVANCE WHAT THEY WILL BE ‘‘ A PERFECT COMBINATION FOR BUSINESS THINKING feeling imagination philosophy believes possibilities impetuous images risk taking fantasy spatial future logical details science knowing strategies practical language safety reality pattern pastOR WHERE THEY WILL CROP UP.Fran B. Jewett / Vice PresidentResearch and Development /AT&T / 1925 -1945 NO SINGLE PERSON OR DEPARTMENTGROWTH REQUIRES INNOVATION.CALL ON YOUR RESOURCES TO HELP.We are all born with a brain with two hemispheres. Theright side tends to be more imaginative and intuitive than EVERY PERSON HAS THE POTENTIALthe left, which is logical and analytical. Evidence shows TO PROVIDE WINNING IDEASthey’re non-exclusive, with one side helping the other withall the machinations required for us to function. One ofthese functions is creativity, the place where ideas are born.PEOPLE HAVE IDEAS.THE MORE PEOPLE, THE MORE IDEAS.30 31
  16. 16. xIDEAS. TRY IT FOR YOURSELFWhat improvements would you make to this can?How could you be innovative with this can?IMPROVEMENTSINNOVATIONComing-up with ways to improve the can (bigger, easier toopen, lighter) is FLUID thinking. Coming-up with new waysto use the can (rolling-pin, bomb, paper-weight, signal flare)is FLEXIBLE thinking—and truly innovative. Most ideas comefrom fluid thinking. Big changes come from flexible thinking.BOTH CAN UNCOVER THE X-FACTOR.32 33
  17. 17. x IDEAS COME NATURALLY. A PROCESS HELPS.History has shown that many fantastic ideas have come from employeesat all levels within organizations, often resulting in vast new revenues ora substantial cut in costs, and on occasions both at the same time. Somehave spawned entirely new product categories and industries. INVOLVEMENTThe problem is that ideas cannot be generated on demand. Nor, asresearch shows, can they be driven by extrinsic rewards, such as moneyor large gifts. Likewise, initiatives such as ‘suggestion boxes’, which havebeen around for over a hundred years, and ‘brain-storming’, a conceptoriginating in the 1930’S*, are now known to have limited impact. (This isnot to say these have not provided many good suggestions or ideas— ALIGNMENT MANAGEMENTthey have.) HOWEVER, AS GOOD IDEAS ARE RANDOM, NO ONE CAN PREDICT WHERE, WHEN OR HOW THEY WILL PRESENT THEMSELVES AND THE MOST PRACTICAL WAY TO REVEAL THEM IS TO DEVELOP A BUSINESS WHERE CREATIVITY IS ENCOURAGED AND SUPPORTED—AND THIS REQUIRES A PROCESS. RECOGNITION*Accredited to Advertising Executive Alex Osborn, who wanted to improve the outcome of business meetings by suggesting that many quickly generated ideas could lead to the discovery of one, or a number of, good ones and that judgement should be held while ideas are being generated. Today research into this approach shows it has little to do with creativity, easily proven by the fact that many good deci- sions aren’t necessarily creative and creative decisions are not always good ones.34 35
  18. 18. x YOU HAVE NO IDEA WHO WILL COME-UP WITH A GREAT IDEA. SO HELP THEM TO HELP YOU. ENCOURAGE EVERYONE to be involved. This includes management taking time to listen to ideas—no matter how random or seeminglyINVOLVEMENT insignificant. Often ideas are in the very early stage of thought, with the benefits only clear to the person who owns an idea. ‘Aha’ moments are sparked by being ALIGNED to a purpose, even though it may not be considered important at that moment. (Later it may reveal itself to be of greater value than originally thought.) Once we give attention, even unconsciously, to a specific purpose, we tend to be more observant to things related to it, which in turn providesALIGNMENT insight and information. Facts start falling into place, questions are asked and answers begin to evolve. Provide a bold point on the horizon at which staff can aim. Research demonstrates that ideas cannot be generated on the premise of being rewarded. But they SHOULD BE RECOGNIZED. This does not have to be extravagant. (Promises of big rewards will stifle creativity.) Unless a problem or desire has an intrinsic value to anRECOGNITION individual, there is little motivation to find an answer or solution. Fear, greed, ego, happiness, and pride are a few of the many drivers from which ideas arise. (By the way, because these are important to the individual, the act of creativity becomes self-starting.) It is common to have ideas presented where the benefits are only clear to the person with the idea. Allow them time to explore their thoughts, to tinker around, experiment and shape their idea. ‘HEY, I’VE But follow-up. To take ideas to a conclusion it’s important to PUT HAD AN IDEA’MANAGEMENT CONTROLS IN PLACE to evaluate each idea based on the value they offer the organization. Explaining this criteria to staff saves time by preventing ideas which make little sense or have no value from being tabled too early or unnecessarily. 36 37
  19. 19. xIDEAS. A MANAGEMENT TOOL.If at first, the idea is not absurd, then there is nohope for it - ALBERT EINSTEIN. An idea that is devel-oped and put into action is more important thanan idea that exists only as an idea - BUDDHA. Weoften refuse to accept an idea merely becausethe tone of voice in which it has been expressed Name: Department: Date: is unsympathetic to us - This is my idea: FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE. This is why I think my idea will work: My idea helps to save money. My idea helps to improve business efficiency. My idea helps get new customers. My idea helps to improve customer service. My idea helps to............................................... The tangible results of this idea may be: An improvement (changes to what is already done) and/or An innovation (an entirely new activity) for the company I’m not sure. I think it may be possible to save or generate... $ I’m not sure if this can be quantified and need help to explore this opportunity I am aware of the CEO 30 day rule. The date I discussed this idea with my manager... ....... / ....... / ....... I have collected my reward. SignedRobert Collier / Motivational Author / 1885-195038 39
  20. 20. p POSITIONING Be known and remembered for something unique. Photo source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/goodrob13/ 1613 YEARS AGO 1613 THIS GUY WAS UNIQUE FOR BEING ABLE TO READ WITHOUT MOVING HIS LIPS. (ST. AMBROSE) EACH OF US ARE EXPOSED TO AS MANY AS 3000 MARKETING YEARS MESSAGES PER LATER DAY. HOW ARE YOU REMEMBERED?40 41
  21. 21. pPOSITIONING. YOU HAVETO BE REMEMBERED. POSITIVELY.Our brain decides what to keep and what to throw-out. It filters(A) and limits how much stimuli we process and retain, andallows only selected data to enter our short-term memory (whichcan only hold so much for a limited amount of time). (B) If this data or information* is important enough to us, it is transferred to the long-term memory where it can be retained for THIS IS WHAT YOU WANT. years, and in some cases, for the rest of our lives. (C) A POSITIVE AND SOLID LONG TERM POSITION IN THE MINDTHIS IS WHAT MARKETERS WANT—for their message to pass OF YOUR PROSPECTS ANDthrough the filters, into the short-term memory and finally, enter CUSTOMERS.a customer’s long-term memory where it can be retained andrecalled.It is here where you can be thought about and talked about. Andif this memory or awareness is appealing and positive, bingo,you’re closer to having customers wanting to buy your productsor services. And once having done so, returning for more. THISIS BASICALLY WHAT POSITIONING IS ALL ABOUT—‘placing yourorganization in the right part of the mind of your customers’, or inlayman’s terms—‘being positively remembered’.*Data being a collection of facts, statistics and items, and information being a collection of those things in a way that provides an understanding. Winston Churchill42 43
  22. 22. pPOSITIONING.BE UNIQUE.Your competitors have the same objective, and to help knock themout of the way or reposition them, you have to differentiate yourself.You need to stand-out. Differentiation is what it is all about. After all,without it, businesses would have difficulty competing against oneanother. This is vital, and good marketing organizations go to greatlengths to develop their differentiation and promote the heck out if itin order to position themselves in the minds of their target market.1 Make your customers aware of what’s UNIQUE about your business, products or services.POSITIONING.PROVIDE AN EXPERIENCE.Usually we have an experience when encountering and observingsomething in a personal and engaging manner (and acquire a certainamount of knowledge as a result of it). The more emotionally involvedwe are, the more we retain—both positive and negative.We know that when exposed to shocking or disturbing emotionaloccurrences, we are able to remember these for years. The sameapplies for highly enjoyable experiences. In short it can be saidthat long-term memory—precisely where we want our marketingmessages to be retained—is helped by encountering well-definedexperiences. 2 Have your customers encounter an EXPERIENCE when dealing with your business44 45
  23. 23. pPOSITIONING. BE UNIQUE.DEFINE YOUR UNIQUE SELLING PROPOSITIONEvery organization has the opportunity to develop and promote some-thing unique about itself, its products and services.A great way to define this is to develop and promote a ‘Positioning State-ment’, or a ‘Unique Selling Proposition’, (‘USP’)* which outlines the mostunique, attractive and appealing benefit to buyers about a business, itsproducts or its services. Hopefully one which cannot, or is difficult to beused by competitors. And BECAUSE A ‘USP’ OUTLINES A MAJOR ADVANTAGEOF A BUSINESS, PRODUCT OR SERVICE OVER THOSE OF ITS COMPETITORS, ITPROVIDES A PLATFORM FOR ALL OF ITS MARKETING EFFORTS.Unless it’s blatantly obvious, such as having a totally unique productor service, the lowest pricing, or simply being the only operator in town,developing your USP requires analytical and creative thinking, oftenstarting with questions such as these:1 What unique BENEFIT OR BENEFITS do we, or can we, offer customers?2 Are our benefits NOTABLY DIFFERENT from those of our competitors?3 Do the benefits offer enough true or perceived VALUE to motivate customers to buy from us?*A phrase invented by Rosser Reeves of Ted Bates and Company in the 1940’s.46 47
  24. 24. pPOSITIONING. THINK UNIQUE. SELF-ACTUALIZATION fulfillment, consciousnessDON’T FORGET WHAT’S IN IT FOR THEM.It’s vital that your USP is recognized and understood as providing AESTHETIC / COGNITIVE AIM TO SATISFY beauty, order, knowledgevalue for customers. This question must always be asked, and THESE NEEDS. ESTEEManswered: “WHAT’S IN IT FOR THEM?” respect, reputation, achievement SOCIALTIPS ON DEVELOPING YOUR USP. family, friendship, interactionSpecifics sell, non-specifics don’t. The same applies to your USP, SAFETY shelter, clothing, securitywhich is simply a statement provided by a seller but taking intoaccount a buyer’s point of view. Buyers like specifics. It helps PHYSIOLOGICAL food, water, sleepidentify value.It’s not ‘an airline’, it’s ‘the cheapest way to fly’. A ‘safe car’ is fine,but ‘a car 20% safer than others in its class’ is so much better. MASLOW’S HIERARCHY OF NEEDSAnd who just wants a hamburger? A ‘half-pound, juicier, tastierhamburger’ is so much more appealing. Be specific, and quantify Abraham Maslow’s ‘Hierarchy of Needs’if you can. regarding human motivation outlined that people are motivated to satisfy primary needs before higher needs can be met. In today’s world, primary needs are easily satisfied,On a point of motivation, when it comes to what drives a customer to and sales and marketing messages shouldpurchase, a little psychology and practicality goes a long way. For many consider appealing to the higher needs.years marketers have understood that motivators to satisfy primary needs,such as for food, shelter, clothing, and safety have evolved into a muchmore interesting place. Thanks in part to ‘differentiation’, selling and buying (USE YOUR HEAD)has shifted from primary to secondary needs. The need for food has beenreplaced with a desire for gourmet meals. Designer labels trumps clothing,and shelter could as easily be ‘a bigger, better home than those of friendsor neighbors’.48 49
  25. 25. 50 p DOODLE IF YOU NEED TO... POSITIONING. WHAT’S YOUR USP? Write down where you think you are unique in each of the categories below. Then select two of Developing a your most threatening competitors and mark off how you think they compare. (1 being similar ‘Unique Selling Proposition’ with 10 being totally unique.) Look for gaps and opportunities on where to focus, or develop your Unique Selling Proposition. What makes us unique (.............................................................................................................................) Your Business PRODUCTS Competitor A 1 10 Competitor B What makes us unique (.............................................................................................................................) Your Business PRICING Competitor A 1 10 Competitor B What makes us unique (.............................................................................................................................) Your Business PLACEMENT Competitor A 1 10 Competitor B What makes us unique (.............................................................................................................................) Your Business PROMOTION Competitor A 1 10 Competitor B What makes us unique (.............................................................................................................................) Your Business CUSTOMER Competitor A 10 EXPERIENCES 151 Competitor B
  26. 26. p POSITIONING = EXPERIENCE PROVIDE AN EXPERIENCE1970’s Thanks to leaps in technology and process improvement, manufac- FOR YOUR CUSTOMERS.turers had the capability to roll-out well tested products off production lines in Unless totally unique, organizations, products anda consistent manner. Product reliability had become fairly well assured and services can be EASILY FORGOTTEN. To help cementworth promoting. So reliability became a marketing approach. It wasn’t long your positioning, customers need to encounter anthough before everyone was touting this claim, essentially standardizing it and experience when dealing with your business. Thiswatering down any competitive advantages. requires ‘EXPERIENCE MARKETING’.1980’s It occurred to marketers that as products required servicing or repairs,outstanding customer service could be a competitive advantage. So servicebecame the marketing approach for the 1980’s. But as with reliability, service 2010 Buyers begin to demand,soon became standardized forcing marketers to start scratching their heads and expect, interactiveand asking, “What now?” PARTICIPATION (experience) with the brand and its1990’s Two things were evolving to change the landscape. The first was the organization.emergence of a new type of consumer conscience, driven in some part by thedesire for change from the 1980’s—a time many considered as the ‘financial (or 2000 ‘‘greed) economy’. The second major thing unfolding was the emergence of the Reliability and Serviceinformation, or knowledge era. The Internet had arrived. With this jump in easy, becomes standardized and buyers begin to shifthigh-speed access to information, consumers could compare products and purchasing according toservices, benefits and value, as never before. And they could share their views IMAGE OR BRAND personality.and customer experiences–good and bad–almost instantly, without censure,and globally. Word-of-mouth (or world-of-mouth) had taken on a whole newdimension. Almost overnight. Marketers realized this is an opportunity for a 1990 SERVICE becomes anew channel of communication and promotion, beyond products or services, to marketing approach.include a total impression of the organization. As a result greater attention wasgiven to branding, or the ‘brand experience’. T H TO 19802000+ As consumer interaction with organizations became a ‘norm’, THE PA IENCE RELIABILITY becomescompanies had to find ways to make this interaction more appealing and ‘EXPER ETING’ a marketing approach. MARKlonger lasting. This led marketers to think about designing and improving thecustomer experience, all the way from product development to manufacturing 1970to distribution and sales and service–and doing so across all areas where Global leap in Technology andprospects and customers interacted with the organization, its management and Process Management.staff, both physically and through advertising and promotions. The customerexperience had come of age, and gave real weight to Experience Marketing.52 53
  27. 27. , ,, p EXPERIENCES 4.50 MEMORABLETHE GOAL OF EXPERIENCE MARKETINGIS TO BE (POSITIVELY) MEMORABLE. IT’S GOOD FOR BUSINESS.According to Forrester research, consumers prefer better customers SERVICES 1.75 INTANGIBLEexperiences over lower prices and better customer experiences drivehigher revenue and profits. (When Forrester calculated contribution tothe bottom-line from customer experiences, it found that revenue couldbe increased substantially. In the case of a retailer, it could be nearly$70 million.’)*There are many components to experience marketing. Be sure to include GOODS 0.15 TANGIBLEthe three primary ones... STAGING - INTERACTION - ENJOYMENT*Source: Posted by Natalie Petouhoff. http://blogs.forrester.com/business_ COMMODITIES 0.02 FUNGIBLE process/2010/02/customer-experience-increases-the-bottomline-and-social- media-makes-changing-the-customer-experience.html $ PER CUP OF COFFEE The Experience Economy B. Joseph Pine II & James H. Gilmore54 55
  28. 28. p STAGING = A PLATFORM FOR AN EXPERIENCE ENJOYMENT = A PLACE OF FUN AND SAFETYProducers and Directors know that the look and feel of a stage or a set Doing business with an organization which comes across asis a must to enhance a play, or a movie. Colors, lighting, props, sound, up-tight and formal tends to create a guarded buyer. This does noteven smell, all add up to provide context to a story, making an audience’s mean a business environment needs to be relaxed or laid-back.experience more enjoyable and memorable. No reason why the same But when buyers feel relaxed, they are open to new ideas andcan’t be done for a business to enhance customer experience. (Walt possibilities.Disney, the father of Experience Marketing, had this nailed. When he One way to do this is to provide entertainment, or be enter-opened Disneyland in 1955, he took amusement parks to a new level by taining, as part of an experience. Providing pleasurefocusing on staging. He understood that by engaging and involving his or amusement allows visitors to simply enjoy beingguests (not customers) in a theme, on a ‘stage’, he’d create an enjoyable in a place. It helps take the edge off. Music, videos,experience, which in turn meant they would stay longer, spend money, acts, books, and games, are means or activitiesspread the word, return for more.) to help, in a non-confronting manner, to comfort INTERACTION = LEARNING customers and add to the experience ofWhen a certain amount of knowledge or wisdom on a subject is doing business with you.acquired—by encountering it in a personal and engaging manner—theexperience becomes more meaningful and longer lasting. But beware:vision and missions statements, advertising, brochures, elevator pitches,sales presentations, manuals, proposals and web sites may be packedwith information, but when seen, heard or read by buyers, don’t neces-sarily equate to gaining knowledge through a personal and engagingexperience. Encouraged to become directly involved in learning, buyersacquire a greater understanding of the organization, its products andservices, and retain the information for longer. Better still, if it is interac-tive and enjoyable. Consider modern museums where visitors are able totouch, open, push buttons, pull levers, take apart and climb on exhibits.This mix of visual, auditory and kinesthetic* activities provides an enjoy-able learning process, helping visitors to gather information—throughinteractive and experiential means—allowing them to acquire knowledgeon their own terms and remember it as an enjoyable experience. If yourbusiness can engage—and educate—customers, not only will they comeback for more, they’ll bring others. YOUR*Kinesthetic: Learning through a physical activity, rather than watching a demon- stration, reading a book, or listening to a lecture. BUSINESS56 57
  29. 29. 58 p DOODLE IF YOU NEED TO... ARE YOU PROVIDING? POSITIONING. WHAT EXPERIENCE To help create a business with a ‘customer experience’, ask yourself, “what type of ‘experience’ Developing a do you think your prospects might have expected before encountering your business, and what ‘Customer Experience’ they actually think of the experience afterwards?” Compare your answers and ‘think what you would change?’ How would you help these businesses? STAGING INTERACTION ENJOYMENT Before Change Before Change Before Change YOUR ACCOUNTANT YOUR HAIR SALON YOUR SUPERMARKET YOUR BUSINESS59
  30. 30. a ‘‘ ADVERTISING SAYS TO PEOPLE, ‘HERE’S WHAT WE’VE GOT. HERE’S WHAT IT WILL DO FOR YOU. HERE’S HOW ‘‘ TO GET IT. Leo Burnett / 1891-1971 Founder of the famous Advertising Agency, now known as Leo Burnett Worldwide, and accredited for having created the ‘Marlboro Man’, the ‘Pillsbury Doughboy’, ‘Toucan Sam’ and ‘Tony the Tiger’. He was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century.60 61
  31. 31. aADVERTISING. PEOPLE WERESCRATCHING MESSAGES ON ROCKWALLS 20,000 YEARS AGO.As long as humans have been communicating, they’ve beenadvertising. (Even the oldest profession had to promote theirwares; think about it.) Its purpose is to persuade people topurchase products or services, or take some other action. Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/the_odyssey/With the advent of mass production, advertising was all aboutPUSHING-OUT messages. Newspapers, magazines, TV, radio,were the basic mediums. Companies with deep pockets couldreach many people across the nation at the same time. Thenext wave saw the arrival of serious direct marketing. It hadbecome easier to identify target audiences by their demo- (TRADITIONAL APPROACH)graphics (who and where) and psychographics (why and how) ORGANIZATIONand deliver far more specific messages via catalogues, letters ADVERTISINGand pamphlets. And thanks to advances in telecommunication, AUDIENCEtargeting, database management and logistics, telemarketingcame into its own. But still, advertising was mostly aboutPUSHING-OUT messages.While the above approaches remain (and in some cases are MESSAGE ACTIONin serious decline) the ‘new’ medium for advertising, prob-ably the most powerful ever, is the internet. For the first time,advertisers are able to truly shift from a pushing approach to aPARTICIPATORY ONE. ORGANIZATION ADVERTISING AUDIENCE (CURRENT APPROACH)62 63
  32. 32. a WHEN TED TURNER, THE BILLIONAIRE AND FOUNDER OF THE CABLE NEWS NETWORK CNN, WAS ASKED FOR HIS SECRET TO SUCCESS HE REPLIED,“EARLY TO BED, EARLY TO RISE, WORK LIKE HELL AND ADVERTISE”According to Advertising Age, a leading industry publication,spending for the top 100 national advertisers plunged 10.2% in2009. However, of those “with the guts to spend more”, 70% sawUS sales increase at double the success rate of those whosespending declined.* It’s an old story but an important one—you’vegot to advertise.Of course for many small business owners this seems like atime-consuming, costly and risky activity, although many agree, anecessary one. But doing it yourself is not nearly as difficult asoften thought. (If you can afford to hire professionals, do so. Butkeep them accountable.)TO HELP YOU ALONG, CONSIDER THESE TWO THINGS. 1 Follow a few TRIED AND TESTED GUIDELINES. (Don’t try to be too smart or creative.) 2 Tap into the WEB. (It makes advertising easier and cheaper than ever before.)*See Advertising Age, June, 21, 201064 65
  33. 33. RESULTS COUNT—don’t advertise for the sake of advertising. Advertise for sales. Every product or service has something someone will want. First figure out WHAT’S IN IT FOR THEM and the ‘how to advertise it’ becomes clearer.a Structure your advertising to AIDA: Attention, Interest, Desire and Action. And don’t forget ‘M’, forWHY DOES ONE motivation, as in what motivates your audience to buy from you.ADVERTISEMENT WORK CLARITY is far more important than cleverness andBETTER THAN ANOTHER superlatives.SIMILAR ONE? Quantify, or highlight value whenever you can. (Allow me to say it again—SPECIFICS SELL, NON-USUALLY IT’S BECAUSE IT FOLLOWED A SPECIFICS DO NOT.)FEW GUIDELINES. HEADLINES pull many more times than body-copy.Advertisers want the best bang for their buck. But being a Take your time developing one.blend of art, sales skills, mathematics (media buying) and YOUR LOGO IS NOT YOUR HEADLINE.common sense, it’s not that easy to know what worksand what doesn’t. This explains the millions spent on Use images which relate to your product, service orresearch. The good news is that it consistently shows offer. DON’T BE CUTE.that a few basic tried and tested principles help. PEOPLE WILL READ BODY-COPY—even long copy—ifHERE ARE A FEW. Use them to your advantage. well written, relevant, and they can understand what’s in it for them. But keep it simple (clarity) and make it sound like one person speaking to another. Include A CALL TO ACTION. Make it easy for your audience to contact you. Layout your advertisements, brochures, designs, signs, presentations, business cards, etc., FROM LEFT TO RIGHT. (See page 70)66 67
  34. 34. IF YOU HAVE ACCESS TO THESE, USE THEM TO PROMOTE YOUR MESSAGE. aADVERTISE. IF YOUR TARGETMARKET CAN SEE, HEAR,TOUCH, SMELL, TASTE (AND ARTICLES POSTERSHAS FEELINGS) YOU HAVE BILLBOARDS PRESENTATIONSA GAZILLION WAYS OF BROCHURES BULLETIN BOARDS PRESS RELEASES REPORTSENGAGING THEM WITH YOUR DIRECT MAIL E-MAIL RADIO SPEAKINGADVERTISING MESSAGE. EDITORIALS SPECIAL EVENTS EVENTS SPECIAL OFFERSBusiness scholars are fast to point out that adver- FLYERS TELEMARKETINGtising is only one component of the promotional MAGAZINES TELEVISIONmix (and that face-to-face selling is included in NETWORKING TEXT MESSAGESthe mix). They’re right. But don’t get caught up in NEWSLETTERS T-SHIRTStechnicalities. NEWSPAPERS WEB-SITES NOVELTIES YELLOW PAGESWhere, and whenever, you get the chance to ONLINE MORE....communicate (advertise) your message, do so.The more your audience sees, reads or hearsabout you, the better. JUST BE CONSISTENT IN YOURTHEME, UNIQUE SELLING PROPOSITION, (OR UNIQUEVALUE PROPOSITION) AND STYLE.68 69
  35. 35. aADVERTISE. MAKE IT EASIER FORYOUR AUDIENCE TO READ YOURADVERTISING. YOU’LL SELL MORE. SEE FOR YOURSELF. SELECT WHICH OF THE BELOW LAYOUTS IS THE MOST COMFORTABLE TO READ.Advertising (design) layouts must be comfortable on theeye, easy to read, and make sense—before worrying aboutbeing fantastically creative.HERE’S A TIP; Because of the way we read,* our eye tends to IMPROVE YOUR g =2xpandbe automatically attracted to the top left of a page - or any BUSINESS BY 10%graphic design. It then sweeps left to right down the page WITHIN 3 MONTHS. to the bottom right hand corner. WE READ FROM HERE... Asking the eye to back-track towards the ‘X’s creates reading X or visual resistance. Research (including Edmund Arnold’s IMPROVE YOUR BUSINESS BY 10% Gutenberg Diagram model**) g =2xpand WITHIN 3 MONTHS. informs us that any design which contradicts this natural X flow, is easily disregarded. IMPROVE IMPROVE YOUR YOUR ...TO HERE. BUSINESS BUSINESS HERE ARE A FEW MORE TIPS; BY 10% BY 10% Headlines are meant to flag- WITHIN 3 WITHIN 3 MONTHS. MONTHS.down readers. And as up to five more people will readheadlines, than the body-copy, this is where the sellingstarts. Use sub-headlines to pull readers through yourbody-copy. Keep you copy in columns. It’s easier to read.Never use more than three typefaces. (Keep it simple.) g =2xpand g =2xpand*In the Western World. **Edmund C. Arnold is considered by many as the ‘father of modern newspaper design’ and respon- sible for more than 250 newspaper designs.70 71
  36. 36. aADVERTISE. TRY IT FOR YOURSELFTake one of your existing advertisements, a page from abrochure, even a powerpoint slide, and redesign its layoutfollowing the basic guidelines on the previous page. DOODLE IF YOU NEED TO... LANDSCAPE PORTRAIT72 73
  37. 37. a ADVERTISE ONLINE. (GO BEYOND YOUR WEB SITE) EASY ACCESS: Nearly everyone in business has the meansRETURN ON INVESTMENT (ROI) to utilize the internet to advertise, As with traditional mediums, advertisers can go global, regional, or local. In all cases people have the means to easily find you—thanks to search engines such as Google, Yahoo, Bing, and youtube. (There It took are hundreds more.) 38 approximately 38 years for Radio to INSTANTANEOUS: Advertising can be created and delivered reach 50,000,000 virtually on the spur of the moment. There are no deadlines, 13 people in the USA. or waiting periods. Now folks can produce an advertisement Television took around and publish it at will. The same can be said for measuring 13 years to do the same. responses. Once you’re online, people are able to respond 5 The internet achieved this in 5 years. immediately. People use the internet COST EFFECTIVE & MEASURABLE: Advertising on the internet can be both free or paid for. ‘Pay-for-performance’ 59,000,000 + in North America* models and easy to access and use tools make for highly efficient means to measure ‘Return On Investment’ (ROI) PARTICIPATORY: In traditional media, advertising is aboutRETURN ON INTERACTION (ROI) pushing a message outwards (one way). With the internet, an organization can now engage and interact with its target audience. INTERCONNECTED: The internet is loaded with communities and (social) networks providing groups of people the means to bond and exchange facts, views and ideas aligned to particular interests, topics or causes. *Source: http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats.htm / including Nielsen Online and International Telecommunications Union. 74 75
  38. 38. aADVERTISE. BE SOCIAL. There are many online marketing tools avail- MY STORY able to business owners—web sites, search engine results, online classified ads, banner advertising, e-mail, texting, and rich media (audio, video or special effects). However, the internet offers more. Consider this; she canconceptualize, write, design, produce a video, distribute a messageto thousands of people, get people to forward it on, and she can track I HEAR YOU...responses and results—ALL WITHIN A FEW HOURS.She’s thirteen years old and there are millions just like her. Theirtrick? SOCIAL NETWORKING using blogs, texts and e-mail through sitessuch as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, My Space and YouTube. (Thereare hundreds more which are easily accessible, and a great place topromote your business at little or no direct cost.) I SUGGEST...What makes this approach particularly powerful is that it’s all aboutengagement through communication—which of course is the essenceof the selling process (listening, adjusting, adapting and responding). I DISLIKE...By engaging directly, in real time, with its target market, a businesscan exchange ideas and feedback, helping to promote and refine itsoffer, products, services and brand awareness, which, if done well, I WANT...leads to sales.I understand that for newbies this process can be confusing, and Isuggest you explore guidelines, ideas and lessons. But don’t worry, I’LL BUY TWO MORE!there are many resources to help you find, or create your own, socialnetwork groups. Groups with relevance to, or an interest in your typeof organization, product and service with whom you can engage withan appealing story. Get this half right and these groups will in turn,connect, share and discuss your organization with others. And themore who share your story, the more you will become known.76 77
  39. 39. ‘‘ THE THOUGHTand OF NEGOTIATION CAN BE INTIMIDATING, CONJURING UP IMAGES OF CORPORATE MERGERS, INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES AND UNITED NATIONS’ PEACE TREATIES, BUT DON’T = NEGOTIATE = SALES n WORRY: A NEGOTIATION IS SIMPLY A PROCESS OF COMING TO AN AGREEMENT. THAT’S SOMETHING YOU DO EVER DAY, SEVERAL TIMES A DAY, ALTHOUGH ‘‘ YOU MAY NOT BE AWARE OF IT. Karen Adamedes Author and Motivational Speaker. Hot Tips For Career Chicks. Page 117 78 79
  40. 40. nSELLING IS NEGOTIATION.NEGOTIATION IS SELLING. American Industrialist, Jean Paul Getty said, “IDepending on the definition, people negotiate largely to enhance buy when other peopletheir own outcomes. But wait, isn’t this generally the same as are selling.” Nothing, notselling? Purists may argue there’s a difference. I’m not sure what it one thing in this bookletis. So for the sake of simplicity, let’s call it selling. As Karen points counts for anything ifout on the previous page, it is something we all do many times each you’re not selling. Thisday—unless of course you own or manage a small business, when is a fact. It’s a curiousit’s pretty much part of your life. Certainly your livelihood. anomaly then, that so many organizations spendThis is why there are hundreds of sales courses. IF YOU’VE NEVER a fortune on marketingTAKEN ONE, I SUGGEST YOU DO. Take more than one course and you’ll ONLY TO BE HELD BACKnotice a few things remain consistent... AT THE SALES COUNTER BY POORLY TRAINED, OR There are ‘NO BORN SALES PEOPLE’. Sure there are those who DISINTERESTED, EVEN SURLY have a nature suited to the disciplines, but there are lessons SALES PEOPLE. worth learning. The acronym, ABC, Always-Be-Closing, is a SELLING IS COMMUNICATION—which is the ability to exchange vital component to the facts and opinions through dialogue (or, when advertising, success of any business. through other media.) This does not mean a It’s a RELATIONSHIP GAME. Sales start before the deal is made sales person has to be and lasts long after it’s completed. pushy or demanding. On the contrary. Forcing It’s HARD WORK which requires discipline, perseverance someone to buy is not and a positive attitude. And a smile. A genuine one. (If you selling. It’s being a bully. don’t enjoy selling, don’t make life hard for yourself, or your Smart sales people know customers.) there are far better ways to engage a person and You have to believe, REALLY BELIEVE in what you’re selling. If sell (or negotiate) IN A you don’t, it’s going to be a long, tough road. MANNER WHERE EVERYONE HONESTY AND INTEGRITY ARE NON-NEGOTIABLE. Lie to your COMES AWAY SMILING. customers and you’ll soon be out of business (not to mention making a bad name for decent sales-people).80 81
  41. 41. nSELLING. A CRASH COURSE.If someone is dying of thirst and you have a glass of water for sale, you’renot selling, they are buying. 99% of the time no one is dying of thirst, so asales process is required.This process includes a number of activities, the most important beinglistening. Here’s why: selling is about satisfying a buyer’s needs. Thesellers job is to help uncover and clarify those needs and turn them intowants, and finally, a purchase—and do so in a way a buyer is happy togive up - time, money, effort - in return for the benefits - time, practicality,financial, convenience, emotional, ego, health - resulting from a purchase.BUT THERE IS A COMMON PROBLEM. Until a salesperson understands acustomer’s real needs, providing a solution too early is a sure way oflosing a sale. This is a common mistake, and something we all experi- 3 x According to research Carried out by the Huthwaite Institute, a study of 35,000 sales calls (Spin Selling, McGraw-Hill 1988) indicates that successful sales people spend about three times longer in #1 than unsuccessful salespeople.ence as buyers. We enter a store, and before we know it a sales personis hitting us with features and benefits about a particular product, and wesense a resistance within ourselves. Right? This is normal. Often buyersare uncertain of their own needs, and until comfortable they will have thetendency to revert to a state of mind where it’s safer not to purchase thanto do so. And because sales people focus on what they think a buyer 1 The buyer’s 2 The seller’sneeds (even though they may be correct) they have to work hard at over- view of their view of the needs or buyers’ needscoming the buyer’s resistance. Which in turn only creates more resistance. problems or problemsWHICH BRING US BACK TO LISTENING. Good sales people follow the steps as 3 The buyer’s 4 The seller’sshown in the illustration alongside. And really good sales people spend view of the view of the solution solutionmost of their time listening, aware that as the buyer talks, their needsbecome clearer to themselves and they begin to see and articulate asolution. When this happens they will rarely have objections to their own Unaware or badly trainedsolution. The key then is to get people to talk about their needs and allow sales people jump fromthem to shift them to wants. #1 directly to #4Of course there’s a little more to the selling process, but in reality a goodplace to start (by asking questions) is to get the buyer to talk—while youlisten. DO THIS WELL, AND YOUR SALES WILL INCREASE.82 83
  42. 42. d g=2xpand Grow, or stand still Two words: where & how Innovate or be left behind Position yourself (be different) Advertise, advertise, advertise Negotiate (sell something) d DELIGHT THE HELL OUT OF PEOPLE It’s simply really. Treat any prospect or customer the way you’d like to be treated. Don’t forget the wisdom (and fact) that it’s a heck of lot cheaper to keep a customer than find a new one. So be nice.84 85
  43. 43. ‘‘ SUGGESTED READING: Positioning. The Battle For The Mind. FINALLY STACY, Al Ries & Jack Trout Art Of Writing Copy REMEMBER THIS... Herschell Gordon Lewis The Million Dollar Memoirs Blaine Demlow Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not: nothing is more The Experience Economy B. Joseph Pine II & James H. Gilmore common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan ‘Press On’ has solved and always will ‘‘ Marketing To The Social Web Larry Weber Hot Tips For Career Chicks Karen Adamedes Corporate Creativity Alan G. Robinson & Sam Stern Smart Selling solve the problems of the human race. Peter McCloy Calvin Coolidge. President of the United States / 1923 -1929 ABOUT THE AUTHOR For more than 20 years I have been marketing (and selling) some- thing, to someone, somewhere on the planet. I’ve done this for international giants (VP of Global Marketing for an organization BusinessWeek ® magazine ranked 5th in the world’s top telecommunication companies and 118th in the world’s top 1000 global organizations), and many smaller operations. Along the way I’ve been involved in hundreds of sales pitches, presentations, work-shops and keynote talks, providing me with unique marketing experience and invaluable lessons: Lessons I now share with folks from all walks of life and businesses. It’s what I do. It’s my passion. g=2xpand FABIAN VENTER fabian@fabianventer.com86 87

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