Chapter.01

11,702 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
11,702
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
499
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
146
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Introduce the terms numeric values, text labels, and calculated values.Discuss obvious problems found in the worksheet (see Figure 1.1).
  • Instruct the class on how to modify column width and row height.Discuss how you would correct the error flagged in cell E4.
  • Use Figure 1.2 to illustrate the steps involved in formatting numbers.Introduce the concept of formatting input values.Students should understand the term Accounting Number Format.
  • Introduce the concept of inserting and aligning titles.Figure 1.3 shows the worksheet with the formatting problems corrected.
  • Use Figure 1.4 to illustrate how to modify cell formatting.
  • Illustrate the steps involved in inserting a new column.Use Figure 1.5 to illustrate how to include page numbering or dates in worksheets.
  • Define the term formula.Use Figure 1.6 to illustrate the difference between the default format and the format that displays formulas instead of values.Demonstrate the steps involved in displaying formulas in a worksheet.Instruct students to check their formulas for accuracy.
  • Define the term formula.Use Figure 1.6 to illustrate the difference between the default format and the format that displays formulas instead of values.Demonstrate the steps involved in displaying formulas in a worksheet.Instruct students to check their formulas for accuracy.
  • Use Table 1.2 to discuss arithmetic operators.
  • Discuss the use of formulas and cell references instead of values.
  • Discuss the use of formulas and cell references instead of values.Use Table 1.3 to aid in your discussion of order of precedence rules.
  • Use Figure 1.7 to show the revised worksheet, after correcting problems with the formulas in cells D14 and D15.Figure 1.8 provides an example of a worksheet with values displaying five decimal places.Use Table 1.4 to discuss the different formats in which values can be displayed.
  • Use Figures 1.9 and 1.10 to aid in your discussion about checking the accuracy of formula updates.
  • Use Figure 1.12 to introduce the class to the new worksheet.Demonstrate the steps involved in renaming and adding color to a worksheet tab.
  • Introduce the terms functions, SUM, arguments, syntax, algorithm, and cell range.
  • Use Figure 1.13 to illustrate the steps involved in inserting a function into a formula.
  • Introduce the class to Excel’s AutoSum feature.
  • Table 1.5 shows the Excel functions that are similar to the SUM function.
  • Use Figure 1.16 to illustrate the final worksheet, with formatting.
  • Use Table 1.6 to discuss the estimated sales volume for each of the following price alternatives: low priced, medium priced, and high priced.
  • Use Figure 1.18 to illustrate and compare different ways of organizing the budget workbook. TO create the worksheets for the four quarters and the summary, Paul could select all five worksheets simultaneously by clicking the first tab and then holding down the Shift key and clicking the Summary worksheet tab. Everything he enter would be entered on all five worksheets at the same time.
  • Introduce the class to the concept of relative cell referencing (see Figure 1.20).Discuss what is likely to occur if you copy formulas from one worksheet to another.Note that formulas can be copied in opposite directions, back up columns, and farther to the left on rows.
  • Discuss the steps involved in copying formulas with the fill handle.
  • Introduce the terms absolute cell referencing and mixed reference (see Figure 1.22).
  • Discuss the steps involved in changing a cell reference to an absolute or mixed cell reference.
  • Students should understand the process involved in naming a cell or cell range.Students should understand how to write a formula to subtotal Cost of Goods Sold.Discuss the steps involved in copying formulas into noncontiguous cells.
  • Figure 1.24 shows the completed first quarter budget.
  • Discuss the steps involved in copying a worksheet.Figure 1.25 shows the final summary sheet.
  • Chapter.01

    1. 1. Applying Fundamental Excel Skills and Tools in Problem Solving<br />Chapter 1<br />“When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail.” - Abraham Maslow<br />
    2. 2. Learning Objectives<br />Level 1<br />Define common Excel error messages<br />Correct basic formatting problems in a worksheet<br />Correct errors in simple formulas<br />Determine the order of precedence in formulas<br />Understand precision versus display for cell values<br />
    3. 3. Learning Objectives<br />Level 2<br />Work with multiple worksheets<br />Calculate total, average, minimum, and maximum values with functions<br />Understand how functions work: syntax, arguments, and algorithms<br />Use the AutoSum feature to perform calculations quickly<br />Calculate the number of values using both COUNT and COUNTA<br />
    4. 4. Learning Objectives<br />Level 3<br />Organize a workbook<br />Understand relative, absolute, and mixed cell referencing<br />Write formulas with different types of cell referencing<br />Copy formulas with different types of cell referencing<br />Name a cell or cell range<br />
    5. 5. Functions Covered in This Chapter<br />AVERAGE<br />COUNT<br />COUNTA<br />MIN<br />MAX<br />SUM<br />
    6. 6. Chapter Introduction<br />Fundamental skills and tools encountered when working with Excel to solve problems and support decision making<br />Writing formulas in cells to perform calculations<br />Designing a workbook so that calculations can be automatically updated if input values are changed<br />Formatting options that can be applied to cells and ranges of cells<br />Rules that affect how information is displayed and calculations are performed in an Excel worksheet<br />
    7. 7. Chapter Introduction (continued)<br />Use of simple functions (i.e., shortcuts available for predefined tasks)<br />Results of copying formulas with different kinds of cell references<br />
    8. 8. Level 1 Objectives:Identifying and Correcting Common Errors in Formatting and Formulas<br />Define common Excel error messages<br />Correct basic formatting problems in worksheets<br />Correct errors in simple formulas<br />Determine the order of precedence in formulas<br />Understand precision versus display for cell values<br />
    9. 9. Examining a Basic Worksheetfor Errors<br />Fix obvious errors<br />Use Error Alert button<br />Examine the formula<br />
    10. 10. Insert better image<br />Chapter 1<br />Succeeding in Business with Microsoft Office Excel 2007: A Problem-Solving Approach <br />10<br />Examining a Basic Worksheetfor Errors<br />
    11. 11. Chapter 1<br />Succeeding in Business with Microsoft Office Excel 2007: A Problem-Solving Approach <br />11<br />Examining a Basic Worksheetfor Errors<br />Level 1 home<br />
    12. 12. Excel Error Messages<br />
    13. 13. Correcting Formatting Problems<br />Modifying Column Width and Row Height<br />Checking Error Messages (Error Alert button)<br />Using Commas When Entering Values<br />Formatting Numbers<br />Formatting Dollar Values<br />Inserting and Aligning a Title<br />Inserting Columns and Rows<br />Documenting a Worksheet<br />= Best Practice<br />
    14. 14. Modifying Column Width and Row Height<br />
    15. 15. Checking Error Messages (Error Alert button)<br />
    16. 16. Using Commas When Entering Values<br />Commas in formulas can be problematic<br />=SUM(2,235+B1) is interpreted as 2+235+B1<br />Rule of thumb: Don’t use commas but rather use styling if you want to display your numbers with commas<br />
    17. 17. Formatting Numbers<br />
    18. 18. In accounting, the preferred number format is to align values on the decimal point, in a column of dollars values, and to include a dollar sign only in the first entry in the column and for any grand totals. Repeated dollar sign can clutter the worksheet and are often unnecessary.<br />Formatting Dollar Values<br />
    19. 19. Inserting and Aligning a Title<br />
    20. 20. Inserting Columns and Rows<br />
    21. 21. Worksheet after Correcting Formatting Problems<br />
    22. 22. Documenting a Worksheet<br />When working in teams, with several groups, or even with different companies, it is advisable to include a title on the worksheet, identify the creation date, worksheet author, and any specific information about the company, and/or project. <br />
    23. 23. Creating a Customized Header<br />
    24. 24. Correcting Errors in Formulas<br />Print the Worksheet in Two Different Formats<br />Default format (displays values)<br />Format that displays formulas<br />Check Simple Formulas for Accuracy<br />Use Formulas and Cell References Instead of Values<br />Determine Order of Precedence<br />Precision vs. Display<br />Working with Dates (read on your own)<br />Check Accuracy in Formula Updates<br />
    25. 25. Print the Worksheet in Two Different Formats<br />
    26. 26. Checking Simple Formulas for Accuracy<br />
    27. 27. Use Formulas and Cell References Instead of Values<br />Notice cell D13 in the previous image<br />Using cell references is preferable to directly inputting values into a formula. In this example, if the price of the leather changed or the quantity required to make a shoe increases, it would be easy to enter those changes. <br />By using cell references in formulas the calculations will be automatically updated with any changes to that value.<br />
    28. 28. DeterminingOrder of Precedence Rules<br />
    29. 29. UnderstandingPrecision Versus Display<br />Excel can display values in several different formats without changing the precise value stored in the program<br />
    30. 30. Checking Accuracyin Formula Updates<br />
    31. 31. Checking Accuracyin Formula Updates<br />
    32. 32. Level 1 Summary<br />Locating and correcting common errors in formatting or formulas to make the worksheet readable and functional<br />
    33. 33. Level 2 Objectives:Calculating and Comparing Data Using Simple Functions<br />Working with Multiple Worksheets<br />Calculating Totals Using the SUM Function<br />Understand how functions work: syntax, arguments, and algorithms<br />Calculating Quickly with AutoSum<br />Calculating Average, Minimum, and Maximum Values<br />Inserting Rows and the Impact on Formulas (read on your own)<br />Calculate the Number of Values Using the COUNT and COUNTA Functions<br />
    34. 34. Working with Multiple Worksheets<br />
    35. 35. Functions<br />Functions are predefined formula that performs calculations<br />Structure<br />Function name and open parenthesis mark ‘(‘<br />Arguments (list of inputs in a specific order, separated by commas)<br />Closing parenthesis mark ‘)’<br />Has its own syntax (specifies function name and order of arguments)<br />Behaves according to its algorithm (rules programmed into the function)<br />
    36. 36. Calculating Totals Usingthe SUM Function<br />SUM function<br />Adds a list of values and/or cell ranges<br />
    37. 37. Calculating Quickly with AutoSum<br />Excel has an AutoSum feature for quick calculation<br />
    38. 38. Common Excel Functions<br />
    39. 39. Calculating Average, Minimum, and Maximum Values<br />The AVERAGE function ignores blank cells and cells with text.<br />
    40. 40. Calculating Average, Minimum, and Maximum Values<br />
    41. 41. Calculating the Number of Values Using COUNT and COUNTA Functions<br />COUNT function ignores blank cells and cells with text;COUNTA function does not ignore text cells.<br />
    42. 42. Level 2 Summary<br />Simple functions (SUM, AVERAGE, MIN, MAX, COUNT, COUNTA) and how to use them in formulas<br />Syntax of functions and their underlying algorithms<br />AutoSum tool<br />
    43. 43. Level 3 Objectives:Analyzing Cell References When Writing and Copying Formulas<br />Creating a Budget Workbook<br />Organizing the Workbook<br />Understanding Relative Cell Referencing<br />Understanding Absolute and Mixed Cell Referencing<br />Name a Cell or Cell Range<br />Write Formulas with Different Types of Cell Referencing<br />Completing the Budget Wordbook<br />
    44. 44. Creating a Budget Workbook<br />Setting up a preliminary budget<br />
    45. 45. Organizing the Workbook<br />Inputs and outputs on separate worksheets<br />One worksheet for each quarter with all inputs and outputs for all three pricing alternatives on a single worksheet<br />One worksheet for each pricing alternative with all inputs and outputs for all four quarters on a single worksheet<br />
    46. 46. Understanding Relative Cell Referencing<br />Allows use of a “general” formula over and over again, but with a different set of numbers<br />Can also copy formulas using the fill handle<br />
    47. 47. Relative Cell Referencing<br />Excel automatically alters the new formula relative to the location of the original formula<br />
    48. 48. Understanding Absolute and Mixed Cell Referencing<br />Absolute cell referencing<br />To indicate that a cell reference (both column and row) – or even a part of a cell reference – should remain unchanged when copying<br />Syntax = $ before column letter, before reference number, or both<br />Mixed cell referencing<br />A cell reference that has only one $<br />Common when you need to copy a formula both down a column and across a row at the same time<br />
    49. 49. Understanding Absolute and Mixed Cell Referencing<br />The formula entered in cell C11 applies absolute and mixed cell referencing<br />
    50. 50. Understanding Absolute and Mixed Cell Referencing<br />
    51. 51. Other Cell Referencing Techniques<br />Naming a cell or cell range<br />Writing a formula to subtotal the cost of goods sold<br />Writing a formula to calculate selling expense<br />Writing a formula to calculate projected earning<br />
    52. 52. Write Formulas with Different Types of Cell Referencing<br />
    53. 53. Completing the Budget Worksheet<br />
    54. 54. Level 3 Summary<br />Writing and copying formulas<br />Relative, absolute, and mixed cell references<br />
    55. 55. Chapter Summary<br />Identifying and correcting common errors in formatting and formulas<br />Calculating and comparing data using simple functions<br />Analyzing cell references when writing and copying formulas<br />

    ×