• Like
House
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
Uploaded on

 

More in: Travel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
758
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 14 th Annual CIS and Eastern Europe Business Forum Tucson, Arizona 2 November 2007 Ellen House, Desk Officer U.S. Department of Commerce
  • 2. Entering Eurasian Markets
    • Overview of the Markets: Opportunities and Challenges
    • Department of Commerce Services
    • U.S. Government and other Resources
  • 3. Market Size- 275 Million Belarus – 11m Ukraine – 51 m Moldova – 4m Armenia – 3m Georgia – 5 m Azerbaijan – 7m Turkmenistan – 4m Uzbekistan – 26 m Kyrgyzstan – 4 m Tajikistan – 4 m Kazakhstan – 17m Russia – 145 m Total Eurasia market size – 275 million
  • 4. Eurasia’s 12 Markets
    • Various levels of transition and development … movement towards a market economy.
    • Some are WTO members (Armenia, Georgia, Moldova, Kyrgyzstan), others are more-or-less actively seeking to accede (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Russia, Tajikistan, Ukraine)---good news for U.S. companies.
    • Benefits of WTO accession: more transparent and predictable business environment.
    • Each country has its own market characteristics that require individual attention.
  • 5. U.S. Exports to Eurasia (in mlns of US$)
  • 6. World Bank’s Doing Business in 2008 www. doingbusiness .org
    • Overall “Ease of Doing Business” Rankings (out of 178 countries)
    • Georgia – 18 Russia - 106
    • Armenia – 39 Belarus – 110
    • Kazakhstan - 71 Uzbekistan – 138
    • Moldova – 92 Ukraine - 139
    • Kyrgyz Republic – 94 Tajikistan - 153
    • Azerbaijan – 96 Turkmenistan – N/A
  • 7. Russian Federation
    • World’s 10 th largest economy
    • World’s 3 rd largest foreign currency reserves
    • 2006 FDI $28 billion (Jan.-Sept. 2007 estimate $40 bln)
    • Strong GDP (6.7% in 2006), and disposable income growth
    • U.S. exports grew 20% last year and stronger this year
    • Political and Business Risks are still significant: it is still not an easy place to do business or market to enter
    • Lack of transparency and predictability
    • Saturation in Moscow and St. Pete (look at regions)
    • Competition is fierce from Europe and Asia
  • 8. Other Major Markets: Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan
    • Ukraine: pluses - large market, central position in Europe, strong industrial base; minuses: political instability, needs more reforms
    • Azerbaijan: pluses - oil and gas wealth, GDP growth of 40%; minuses – administrative barriers, lack of transparency
    • Kazakhstan: pluses - huge hydrocarbon reserves, regional hub for Central & S. Asia; minuses – bureaucracy, state interference
  • 9. Challenges for Doing Business in Eurasia
    • Corruption
    • Administrative barriers
    • Selective interpretation of laws
    • Inadequate and inconsistent legislation and enforcement of laws
    • Poor protection of IPR
    • Conflicts between the state and business
    • Unfair competition by local companies
  • 10. Basic Precautions: Keys to Success
    • Do research and choose partners carefully (due diligence)
    • Prepare your expectations and take nothing for granted
    • Build relationships with key personnel on the ground
    • Details (take care of them, or have them taken care of)
    • Find reliable professional assistance (registering, banking, accounting, taxes, opening the office, personnel, security)
    • Get reliable translator/interpreter – translate your materials
    • Know where to go for help
  • 11. Getting Started in Eurasia
    • Take advantage of the unique knowledge and positioning of the U.S. Embassies and CS/BISNIS in the region
    • Become involved with the American Chambers of Commerce (Amchams) and other business associations (as in-country sources of support, information, advocacy) AND
    • Talk to Washington, DC, and other U.S.-based membership organizations (USRBC, FRAEC, AUCC, AGBC, USACC, USKBA, USUBC, etc.)
  • 12. International Trade Administration www.trade.gov
    • Market Access and Compliance
    • (ensuring fair trade and market access for U.S. companies)
    • U.S. Commercial Service
    • (trade promotion)
    • Import Administration
    • (enforcing trade laws, i.e., anti-dumping and countervailing duties)
    • Manufacturing and Services
    • (industry experts)
  • 13. Market Access and Compliance
    • Identifies and overcomes trade barriers, resolves trade policy issues, and ensures that our trading partners fully meet their obligations under our trade agreements.
    • MAC ensures access to world markets for U.S. companies and workers so they can compete on a “level playing field.”
    • MAC country desk officers - experts on the commercial, economic, and political climates in their assigned countries. Focus on resolving trade complaints and market access issues, such as: intellectual property rights, quotas, customs, transparency, commercial disputes with foreign govt entities
  • 14. FYO8 SABIT Group Training Programs www.mac.doc.gov/sabit
    • Hospital Administration
    • Program dates: Jan. 19-Feb. 16, 2007
    • Hotel Management
    • Program dates: Jan. 26-Feb. 23, 2007
    • Infrastructure: Road Construction
    • Program dates: Feb. 23-Mar. 22, 2007
    • Water Resource Management
    • Program dates: Mar. 29-Apr. 26, 2007
    • Energy: Exploration & Production
    • Program dates: Apr. 26-May 24, 2007
    • Infrastructure: Maritime Ports
    • Program dates: May 3-31, 2007
    • Fruits and Vegetable Processing and Packaging
    • Program dates: June 7-July 4, 2007
    • Timber
    • Program dates: July 12-Aug. 9, 2007
    • Dairy Processing & Packaging
    • Program dates: Apr. 26-May 24, 2007
  • 15. MAC Eurasia Desk Officers
    • Belarus, Ukraine, and Moldova
    • Christine Lucyk (202-482-2018, [email_address] )
    • Russia
    • Matthew Edwards (202-482-2354, [email_address] ) or Jay Thompson (202-482-2511, [email_address] )
    • Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan
    • Danica Starks (202-482-3952, [email_address] ) or Ellen House (202-482-0360, [email_address] )
  • 16. BISNIS/CS in Eurasia www.bisnis.doc.gov - www.export.gov
    • Still going as part of CS: staff of 3 in DC, 10 in Eurasia
      • Russia: Krasnodar and Nizhny Novgorod, also Tomsk, Novosibirsk, & Khabarovsk until December 31
      • Caucasus: Tbilisi, planning to hire in Baku
      • Central Asia: Astana, Bishkek, Dushanbe, Tashkent
    • Diminished info and services available
    • 2007 Customs Report – Survey of 8 Countries
    • Upcoming Event on December 11 in Washington, DC: “Business Opportunities in Russia & Ukraine”
  • 17. Commercial Service in Eurasia
    • Ukraine
    • www.buyusa.gov/ukraine/en/
    • Kyiv: Richard Steffens, Senior Commercial Officer
    • Tel: 380-44-490-4018
    • [email_address]
    • Kazakhstan
    • www.buyusa.gov/kazakhstan/en/
    • Almaty: Stuart Schaag, Senior Commercial Officer Tel: 7-727-250-4920
    • Stuart.schaag@mail.doc.gov
    • Russia
    • www.buyusa.gov/russia/en/
    • Moscow: Ms. Beryl Blecher, Senior Commercial Officer Tel: 7-495-737-5030 [email_address]
    • St. Petersburg: Keith Silver, Principal Commercial Officer Tel: 7-812-326-2560 [email_address]
    • Vladivostok: Irina Konstantinova, Commercial Specialist Tel: 7-4232-499-381 irina.konstantinova@mail.doc.gov
  • 18. Sources of Trade & Project Finance
    • Overseas Private Investment Corp . ( www.OPIC.gov ) provides (1) political risk insurance/reinsurance and (2) corporate and project financing (projects with at least 25% U.S. ownership)
    • U.S. Export-Import Bank (Caucasus & Central Asia portal: http://www. exim . gov / centralasia /index. cfm , Russia portal: www.exim.gov/russia/index. cfm ) provides loan guarantees, insurance, and direct loans to h elp foreign buyers finance purchases of U.S. goods and services.
    • U.S. Department of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service ( www.fas.usda.gov ) provides U.S. agricultural exporters with short- and intermediate-term commercial financing support through Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) export credit guarantee programs. (Also, reports and analysis, trade missions and other events, trade leads, etc.)
    • IFIs - European Bank for Reconstruction and Development ( www.ebrd.com ), Asian Development Bank ( www.adb.org ), World Bank ( www.worldbank.org ) have trade finance programs and offer consulting, goods and services procurement opportunities.
  • 19. Ellen House, Desk Officer Office of Russia, Ukraine & Eurasia 202-482-0360, [email_address] The U.S. Department of Commerce is here to assist you to search for opportunities, and assist in any market barriers that you may encounter.