FIUWINETECH OCTOBER 6TH

1,019 views
944 views

Published on

October 6th Lecture

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,019
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
28
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

FIUWINETECH OCTOBER 6TH

  1. 1. Wines of Alsace (France) Germany and Austria
  2. 2. ALSACE <ul><li>99% of wines are white </li></ul><ul><li>Alsace is the only AOC region in France </li></ul><ul><li>to list the grape varetal on the label </li></ul>
  3. 3. Alsace
  4. 4. Main grape varietals <ul><li>Riesling </li></ul><ul><li>Pinot Blanc </li></ul><ul><li>Pinot Gris (aka Tokay d’Alsace) </li></ul><ul><li>Muscat </li></ul><ul><li>Sylvaner </li></ul><ul><li>Gewürztraminer </li></ul>
  5. 5. Alsace Classifications <ul><li>AOC Alsace </li></ul><ul><li>AOC Alsace Grand Cru </li></ul><ul><li>* Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Muscat, Pinot Gris </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Vendange Tardive </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sélection de Grains Nobles </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>AOC Cremant d’Alsace (sparkling wines) </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Rare wines, less than 1% </li></ul><ul><li>of Alsace wine production </li></ul><ul><li>Vendange Tardive (Late Harvest) </li></ul><ul><li>Grapes picked when over-ripe, often several weeks after regular harvest. Some «noble rot» may be present </li></ul><ul><li>Sélection des Grains Nobles </li></ul><ul><li>Affected by «noble rot», individual grapes are picked one-by-one during harvest </li></ul>
  7. 7. Noble Rot (Botrytis Cinerea)
  8. 10. Germany ” A German wine label is one of the things life's too short for, a daunting testimony to that peculiar nation's love of detail and organization.” From the book Everyday Drinking by Kingsley Amis
  9. 11. Germany has 13 wine regions <ul><li>The most famous are </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Mosel-Saar-Ruwer </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rheingau </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rheinhessen </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rheinpfalz </li></ul></ul></ul>
  10. 12. Mosel View
  11. 13. Saar View
  12. 14. Ruwer View
  13. 15. Grapes are listed on label! <ul><li>Main grapes (white) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Riesling </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sylvaner </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Muller-Thurgau </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 16. Traditional German Classifications from low to high <ul><li>Deutscher Tafelwein & Landwein </li></ul><ul><li>Table wine/Country wine (not exported) </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitätswein Bestimmter Anbaugebiete (QBA) </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Wine of a Specified Origin </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitätswein Mit Prädikat (QmP) </li></ul><ul><li>Quality Wine with Specific Attributes </li></ul>
  15. 17. Qualitatswein Bestimmter Anbaugebiete (QBA) <ul><li>Daily quaffing wines </li></ul><ul><li>Blended grape varieties </li></ul><ul><li>Well-known brands: </li></ul><ul><li>Blue Nun (Liebfraumilch) </li></ul><ul><li>Zeller Schwarze Katz </li></ul>
  16. 18. Qualitatswein Mit Pradikat (QmP) Levels indicate stage of ripeness of grapes <ul><li>Kabinett = Dry (Regular harvest) </li></ul><ul><li>Spätlese = Late harvest </li></ul><ul><li>Auslese = Select picking </li></ul><ul><li>Beerenauslese = Select berries picking </li></ul><ul><li>Trockenbeerenauselese = Select dry berries picking </li></ul><ul><li>Eiswein = Ice wine </li></ul>
  17. 20. Other terms on German labels <ul><li>Erzeugerabfüllung = estate bottled </li></ul><ul><li>Gutsabfüllung = bottled by grower's cooperative </li></ul><ul><li>Abfüller = shipper bottled </li></ul><ul><li>Trocken = dry </li></ul><ul><li>Halbtrocken or Feinherb = half-dry/off-dry </li></ul>
  18. 21. AP Number, &quot;Amtliche Prüfnummer&quot; Official Approval Number <ul><li>Official government quality control examination </li></ul><ul><li>Conducted every year </li></ul><ul><li>Control number appears on label of all QbA and QmP wines </li></ul><ul><li>Consists of several blocks of numbers identifing the wine: </li></ul><ul><li>3 907 027 282 98 </li></ul><ul><li>3 Testing center location </li></ul><ul><li>907 Village where winery is located </li></ul><ul><li>027 Code number for the winery </li></ul><ul><li>282 Two-hundred-eighty-second bottling of this wine </li></ul><ul><li>98 Year this test is conducted </li></ul>
  19. 27. Main Austrian Grapes <ul><li>WHITE </li></ul><ul><li>Grüner Veltliner </li></ul><ul><li>Riesling </li></ul><ul><li>RED </li></ul><ul><li>Blauburgunder (Pinot Noir) </li></ul><ul><li>Blaufränkisch </li></ul>
  20. 28. Austrian Wine Classifications Levels indicate stage of ripeness of grapes <ul><li>Tafelwein/Landwein = Table & Country wine (not exported) </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitätswein = Quality Wine of a Specified Origin </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Kabinett - Trocken </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Prädikatswein = Quality Wine with Specific Attributes </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Spätlese = Late harvest </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Auslese = Select picking </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Beerenauslese = Select berries picking </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ausbruch = Select berries picking (botrytis) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Trockenbeerenauselese = Select dry berries picking </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Eiswein = Ice wine </li></ul></ul></ul>
  21. 29. Enough Classifications! Let's move on
  22. 30. How Are Wines Rated?
  23. 31. 100-point scale <ul><li>Most widely used rating method in the USA </li></ul><ul><li>Made popular by wine critic Robert Parker in the 1970s </li></ul><ul><li>The 100-point scale = same as US school grading system </li></ul><ul><li>Used by the following magazines: </li></ul><ul><li>Wine Advocate (Robert Parker's newsletter) </li></ul><ul><li>Wine Spectator </li></ul><ul><li>Wine Enthusiast </li></ul><ul><li>Wine News </li></ul>
  24. 32. 20-point Scale <ul><li>Originally, this was the most popular wine rating scale in the US </li></ul><ul><li>The 20-point scale is most often used in Europe, as that is the basis of the European school grading system </li></ul>
  25. 33. 5-point/5 star Scale <ul><li>Used by Decanter Magazine & The Wall Street Journal </li></ul><ul><li>WSJ ratings by Dorothy J. Gaiter & John Brecher: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Yech </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>OK </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Good </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Very Good </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Delicious or Delicious! </li></ul></ul></ul>
  26. 34. Who wants a B-rated wine? <ul><li>Wine X is rated 89 points out of 100 </li></ul><ul><li>and </li></ul><ul><li>Wine Z is rated 90 points out of 100 </li></ul><ul><li>Wine Z will sell thousands more cases than Wine X because of a 1-point difference </li></ul><ul><li>Wines rated 100 points sell out ASAP, become collector’s items, price goes up dramatically. </li></ul><ul><li>Wine enthusiasts will buy them at ANY price! </li></ul>
  27. 35. Are ratings unfair? <ul><li>&quot;A wine gets rated one time — a nanosecond in its life cycle. From then on, its fate is determined. Aren't wines always evolving? Shouldn't they be rated every year?&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>— Quote from Sebastiani winemaker Mark Lyon </li></ul><ul><li>Most influential publications in wine market: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Robert Parker's Wine Advocate newsletter </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wine Spectator magazine </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Tastings: Individual vs. panel </li></ul><ul><li>When a panel/group tastes, scores are averaged </li></ul>
  28. 36. 100-point scale does not really go from 1 to 100 <ul><li>At Wine Spectator , base starts at 50 points </li></ul><ul><li>At Wine News , base starts at 60 points </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li>Points 0-10 </li></ul><ul><li>Apperarance 5 </li></ul><ul><li>Aroma 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Palate 9 </li></ul><ul><li>Finish/Aftertaste 3 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Subtotal 24 Points </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Base +60 Points </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Total = 84 Points </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  29. 37. A matter of taste… <ul><li>Wine Critic Robert Parker </li></ul><ul><li>+ </li></ul><ul><li>“ Flying Winemakers” </li></ul><ul><li>consulting around the world </li></ul><ul><li> = “sameness” </li></ul><ul><li>Mass appeal </li></ul><ul><li>vs. </li></ul><ul><li>unique, local characteristics </li></ul>
  30. 38. How do critics taste wines? Exhibit #1 <ul><li>Wines are tasted &quot;blind.&quot; The taster does NOT know the price of the wine or the brand </li></ul><ul><li>Reason: </li></ul><ul><li>To avoid any personal bias, preconceived notions, expectations based on price/brand </li></ul>
  31. 39. How do critics taste wines? Exhibit #6 <ul><li>Professionals never swallow! They take a sip, swirl it around in their mouth, inhale, and then spit it out into a spit bucket </li></ul><ul><li>Reason: </li></ul><ul><li>Due to the high volume of wines tasted in a regular tasting session, this ensures the alcohol will not affect the taster </li></ul>
  32. 40. How do other types of critics rate products and services? <ul><li>Restaurant critics </li></ul><ul><li>Movie critics </li></ul><ul><li>Book critics </li></ul><ul><li>Fashion critics </li></ul>
  33. 41. In real life….wine consumers: <ul><li>Know how much they paid for the wine </li></ul><ul><li>See the winery name on label/bottle </li></ul><ul><li>Rarely taste wine in sterile, silent, perfectly-lighted surroundings with white surfaces </li></ul><ul><li>Most often eat food with wine </li></ul><ul><li>Do not spit out their wine! </li></ul>
  34. 42. Critics vs. Consumers <ul><li>Wine consumers and wine critics have… </li></ul><ul><li>… mutually exclusive tasting experiences! </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion: </li></ul><ul><li>Be your own wine critic! </li></ul><ul><li>Your palate and preferences are unique to you </li></ul><ul><li>“ There are standards of taste in wine, poetry and prose…. Each man’s own taste is the standard, and a majority vote cannot decide for him or in any slightest degree affect the supremacy of his own standard.” — Mark Twain, 1895 </li></ul>
  35. 43. Wine: ________________________________________________ Price: _________ Rating: 1 = unacceptable _______ 2 = good _______ 3 = great ______ Aroma intensity : barely perceptible_____ expressive ______concentrated/complex _____ On the Palate ACIDITY soft _____ crisp _____ high/strong ______ TANNINS soft _____ medium ______ intense ______ SWEETNESS needs more ____ just right _____ noticeable _____ cloying/sticky______ OAK PRESENCE none _____ light _____ medium ______ heavy ______ BODY/WEIGHT light _____ medium _____ full ____ FINISH/PERSISTENCE ______ short ______ medium _______ lengthy Purchasing criteria Do not buy at any price_______ Buy only if &quot;priced right&quot;______ Buy at current price______ Buy a case! Great price/value ratio______ Buy for special occasions______ Buy only as collector/showcase item _______
  36. 44. Typical Aromas & Flavors honey cinnamon apricot pear lychee jasmine rose petals strawberry orange/mandarin lime melon papaya pineappple minerals + slate rock candle wax
  37. 45. Wine: ________________________________________________ Price: _________ Rating: 1 = unacceptable _______ 2 = good _______ 3 = great ______ Aroma intensity : barely perceptible_____ expressive ______concentrated/complex _____ On the Palate ACIDITY soft _____ crisp _____ high/strong ______ TANNINS soft _____ medium ______ intense ______ SWEETNESS needs more ____ just right _____ noticeable _____ cloying/sticky______ OAK PRESENCE none _____ light _____ medium ______ heavy ______ BODY/WEIGHT light _____ medium _____ full ____ FINISH/PERSISTENCE ______ short ______ medium _______ lengthy Purchasing criteria Do not buy at any price_______ Buy only if &quot;priced right&quot;______ Buy at current price______ Buy a case! Great price/value ratio______ Buy for special occasions______ Buy only as collector/showcase item _______

×