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Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London
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Street Homelessness among Central and Eastern Europeans in London

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Presentation given by Jenny Edwards, Homeless Link, UK, at a FEANTSA Research Conference on "Migration, Homelessness and Demographic Change in Europe", Pisa, Italy, 2011

Presentation given by Jenny Edwards, Homeless Link, UK, at a FEANTSA Research Conference on "Migration, Homelessness and Demographic Change in Europe", Pisa, Italy, 2011

Published in: News & Politics
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  • The proportion of CEE rough sleepers in London peaked at 32% in the first quarter 2010/11
  • One of the key reasons for an increase in CEE rough sleepers over the last 5 years is that we have got better at identifying and recording their existence. Please remember that the figures for migrants are somewhat distorted as a result. Flow- 67% Stock- 29% Returner 4%
  • One of the key reasons for an increase in CEE rough sleepers over the last 5 years is that we have got better at identifying and recording their existence. Please remember that the figures for migrants are somewhat distorted as a result.
  • Based on PROMPT analysis of rough sleepers in Peterborough and Southwark 54% of the rough sleeping respondents' stated that they would still have come regardless of their resulting situation.
  • INFO SOURCE – Prompt?? Please note these stats are drawn from a sample of migrant rough sleepers so regardless of preparation, work history, accommodation and advice they had still become homeless.
  • Quotes from Prompt in Peterborough and Southwark
  • Prior to migration, limited contact with homelessness services – 3% used a homeless charity, 3% a hostel and 5% a detox programme.
  • The London Reconnection Project has been set up to help vulnerable Central and Eastern European Nationals who are sleeping rough on the streets of London and have expressed a wish to return to their home country. The service offers advice on how someone can return home, as well as information about the support services available within their home country if the person decides to return. The aim is to ensure that they are properly linked into services that match their needs and that they get accommodation and assistance with any health problems such as alcohol or drug abuse. ADDITIONAL – Thames Reach report that they struggle to make reconnection offers to entrenched rough sleeper because they are often gathered in groups where the dynamic does not permit an open dialogue with outreach workers. This has improved through the use of foreign language speaking workers but it remains a key barrier to informing homeless migrants abount the realities of the reconnection process. ADDITIONAL – Thames Reach have identified that the key support needs of homeless Romanian migrants stem from the conditionsof their treaty arrangement that mean they have no recourse to public funds.
  • 2 nd BULLET – from the Guardian story http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/aug/12/homeless-poles-rough-sleepers 3 rd BULLET – extrapolated from CHAIN data 4 th BULLET – from HL’s cuts monitoring project
  • 2 nd & 3 rd BULLET – info drawn from Migrant Rights Network and anecdotal information from HL Regionals. Migrants Rights Network are quite hopeful for the end of Transition and looking at our figures around the % employed and the % who have lived in PRS it is possible that the access to benefits could reduce evictions and homelessness as it may act as a financial bridge between periods of work. ADDITIONAL - Concerns are also directed towards a very different possibility – that the UK could find that it is increasingly a less attractive destination for A8 nationals and suffer from a decrease in numbers of people coming here to work. Since May this year, Germany and Austria have now opened their labour markets to A8 nationals http://www.migrantsrights.org.uk/blog/2011/05/restrictions-a8-nationals-lift-last.
  • Employment and accommodation – Ollalo Project, Upper Room Reliance on faith based groups
  • - More generally, greater awareness of the language and culture of CEE countries amongst UK agencies and service providers would also be welcomed.   - Free helpline which could lead to services being able to intervene with migrants at the point at which their employment breaks down and they are more receptive to messages about finding legitimate work and/or being reconnected to their home country, similar to Olallo Project and Migrant Helpline project. Stronger working relationship and information exchange channels with relevant CEE government departments Explore the role out of the Polish prevention model to other countries in the region. Seek out intermediary organisations in host countries who can disseminate the prevention message to prospective migrants e.g. Brother Albert Society in Poland.
  • - More generally, greater awareness of the language and culture of CEE countries amongst UK agencies and service providers would also be welcomed.   - Free helpline which could lead to services being able to intervene with migrants at the point at which their employment breaks down and they are more receptive to messages about finding legitimate work and/or being reconnected to their home country, similar to Olallo Project and Migrant Helpline project. Stronger working relationship and information exchange channels with relevant CEE government departments Explore the role out of the Polish prevention model to other countries in the region. Seek out intermediary organisations in host countries who can disseminate the prevention message to prospective migrants e.g. Brother Albert Society in Poland.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Migration, Homelessness and Destitution Presentation from Jenny Edwards, Homeless LinkWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 2. CONTEXT 2004 – 1st accession from Central and E Europe (A8s) • Workers Registration Scheme (WRS) for benefits & work 12mths continuously 2007 – 2nd wave from CEE countries – greater restrictions on Romanians and Bulgarians • A2s cannot come unless have work and a permit. 2009 – restrictions extended for 2 yrs • 08/09 EU migrants contributed 37% more than they took in welfare and public services 2011 –end of transitional arrangements • while rough sleeping among UK nationals falling in many areas, its rising among this groupWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 3. PROPORTION OF CEE ROUGH SLEEPERS LONDON 2005-2011WWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 4. THE CURRENT SITUATION 2010/11 data in London identified 3975 rough sleepers CEEs are much more likely to be new to the streets – ‘Flow’ (67%).WWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 5. THE CURRENT SITUATION • Rising trend is not limited to London: also escalating numbers in rural areas and other cities (40% rough sleepers in Manchester and Salford are CEEs).“Tents, fires, shacks and sheltershave been set up across the citywith an immigrant community thatnow accounts for 64 per cent oflocal population growth – thefastest in Britain.”(Daily Express, 11 August 2010) –PeterboroughWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 6. MAPPING THE JOURNEY (cont.) PREPARATION • Only 2/3 (67%) reported being fully prepared prior to making their move. • However, provision of advice or prevention work in the countries of origin is minimal; 21% received accommodation advice and 10% employment advice prior to arrival “I did not speak English at all when I came to the UK, I probably would learn English” “I am homeless because of crisis because of lack of information” Improving advice and preparation in home countries is a priority to prevent homelessness.WWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 7. MAPPING THE JOURNEY EMPLOYMENT: lack of regular and secure employment cause of homelessness •3/4 migrants had been employed in their country of origin. •All have worked in the UK at some point: however a significant problems with employment sustainability. •Many trafficked from home countries – anecdotally this is increasing Circumstances Prior to UK Circumstances after ArrivalWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 8. EMPLOYMENT  “ I was promised work and didn’t get paid for 3months.” “I was brought to Peterborough by people who promised me a job” “ [I’ve been here] five years, I am still working but it is not enough to get into an accommodation””WWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 9. MAPPING THE JOURNEY HOUSING •Few had been homeless in home country •After arrival in UK, over half lived in very insecure or unsuitable housing with over 1/3 moving straight into squats Circumstances Prior to UK Circumstances after ArrivalWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 10. Photos: Thames Reach Reconnection serviceWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 11. KEY SUPPORT ISSUESWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 12. THE CHALLENGES FOR AGENCIES• Traditional solutions not available. Typical route for homeless person in England: Support: health, jobs, drug, alcohol, welfare etc Housing: PrivateRough tenancy;sleeper Supported Hostel Move Oncontacted Accommodationon street Access to these services for CEE clients often limited due to benefit entitlements Different streams of funding: Primarily Housing Benefit and governmentWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK funding (Supporting People)
    • 13. CHALLENGES FOR AGENCIES • Meeting complex needs with limited funding options • Supporting migrants in unsuitable accommodation such as squats and properties run by unethical landlords. • Tension between different nationalities of rough sleepers This is in a context of increased demand and pressures on funding for Local Authorities and Voluntary Sector: an average cut of 22% to homelessness organisations.WWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 14. END OF THE TRANSITIONAL ARRANGEMENTS: WHAT NOW? • Transitional arrangements ended April 2011 (for A8s) • From May 2011 requirement to pass Habitual Residency Tests to get state benefits. • There are mixed reports regarding the HRT: • migrants who are already homeless report problems stemming from their lack of an address. • the lengthy processing time can be an issue especially for destitute migrants.WWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 15. RESPONSES & INTERVENTIONS RECONNECTION •Assisting safe return and supporting clients into appropriate services •Reconnection undertaken by range of agencies in London and increasingly other areas. •‘Routes Home’ portal provides advice, good practice, and consulate information www.reconnect.homeless.org.uk •People can return when better prepared for work and life in UKWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 16. DEFINITIONS Must not confused, three different responses: DEPORTATION ADMINISTRATIVE REMOVAL RECONNECTIONWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 17. RESPONSES & INTERVENTIONS ‘NO SECOND NIGHT OUT’ pilot: •30% reconnections in 3 month period are to countries outside UK •Portuguese man with severe mental health issues returned and accommodated by social services in hometown •Latvian man reconnected with family in hometown •Former Polish teacher walked 40 miles to NSNO hub after failing to find work. Reconnected to stay with friends in Poland •Pregnant Romanian client supported to return to mother. •Austrian client supported to return: found employment in home country within 48 hours.WWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 18. OTHER SOLUTIONS • Targeted employment advice and support, eg Upper Room • Specialist accommodation projects eg Ollalo Project in London • Faith-based groups • Working with DWP and Job Centre Plus • Native speakers as staff and volunteers • Homeless Link securing funding for service development and sharing good practiceWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 19. RECOMMENDATIONS IN EUROPE: Home Countries play greater role in preparing individuals • organisations in host countries disseminate information to prospective migrants about realities of work in UK • stronger working relationship with relevant CEE government departments Tackling illegal gangmasters and traffickers Co-ordinated EU response • Pot of money to support agencies working with destitute clients • ‘One stop shop’ of information and advice • Coordinated protection to prevent EU citizens being destituteWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK
    • 20. RECOMMENDATIONS IN THE UK: • Exploitation taken seriously: more action to prevent illegal work • ‘NSNO’ roll out across England • Maintaining pressure at a national level across government • Reconnection offered where appropriate to prevent destitution • More work with Job Centre Plus to offer employment servicesWWW.HOMELESS.ORG.UK

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