AASW6: Crp on dryland systems icarda caas, china 3 4 june, 2013 version 3 accra

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  • 7. The Fragile Ecosystem of Dry Areas:- The non tropical dry areas, ICARDA’s mandate, areas is the most physical water scarce area of the world. Mean annual per capita share of the region is now below 2000 m3. In some countries it drops below 100 mm annual. With high population growth and depletion the projections for the coming years are alarming and most of the countries will drop below the poverty water scarcity line. - The agro-ecosystems are mainly fragile with rapid land degradation especially in marginal and irrigated areas.- Not only land but groundwater resources are under pressure for increase use and is rapidly declining in both amounts and quality.- Drought is a main feature of the dry areas - With climate change it is expected that water resources will be negatively effected and drought will intensify.
  • In these 5 areas the Dryland Systems CRP will strive to include all major players: farming communities, national research and extension systems, policy makers, international and regional organizations, advanced research institutes, civil society and non-governmental organizations, the private sector, and development agencies.The CRP will bring together people and institutions to provide the expertise needed at each stage of the research-development continuum. At the same time the research aims to identify international public goods that can be out-scaled rapidly to other areas with similar agro-ecologies and system properties, so that research findings can be rapidly disseminated and adopted. One of its major principles is involvement on the ground of multiple stakeholders in each region and community. The Dryland Systems CRP will start with a needs assessment among stakeholders on a regional basis, with a view towards defining activities for the first three years to attain program objectives.
  • Groundwork. In all five Target Regions, interim Interdisciplinary Research Teams (iIRT) were formed from a variety of partners that included national, regional and international agricultural research and development organizations. Their tasks were to:Identify, prioritize, and select major production systems within each Target Region, as well as Target Areas and Action Sites. Action Sites were to be selected using seven criteria, summarized below:Accessibility, proximity to research facilities (partners, CGIAR centers);Potentially amenable to test research hypothesis;Representativeness;Potential for out-scaling: supportive institutional environment, other actors that can support achieving significant and relative impact, target population size;Ability to attract resources; andPotential intersection and synergy with other CRPs.Characterize Target Areas and Action sites to fill in critical information gaps and identify major constraints to and opportunities for achieving Outcomes associated with SRTs for the two broad categories of Dryland Systems, i.e.: Reducing vulnerability and managing risk through increased resilience (SRT2); andSustainable intensification for more productive, profitable and diversified dryland agriculture with well-established linkages to markets (SRT3).Develop a research proposal to achieve the SRT Outcomes for presentation and discussion with stakeholdersat subsequent Regional Inception Workshops (RIWs). For each Target Region, proposals were to characterize production systems, identify putative Action Sites, potential partners, major constraints, and targeted research interventions.  Regional Inception Workshops: Five regional workshops were organized by the iIRTs and held with the following objectives: Inform the various partners of progress in the Dryland Systems CRP including its overall scope, approach and intended impacts both globally and within each Target Region;Revisit and finalize Target Areas, and the Action and Satellite Sites, where the majority of the research will be implemented;Characterize sites for their agro-ecosystems and livelihoods;Identification of major constraints;Analysis of successes and failures in the Target Areas;Form hypotheses and research questions for Action Sites; Identify and prioritize research-for-development undertakings to address these hypotheses and questions;Develop detailed work plans, specific research activities, approaches and methods, partnerships and stakeholders, and needed budgets;Discuss and agree on the elements for a complete logframe to be completed after the RIW;Identify linkages with other CRPs and engagement strategies for joint research;Discuss elements for the Capacity Development Plan using Innovation Platforms, to be finalized after the RIW; andDiscuss and agree on the elements for the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan at the Regional level, to be finalized after the RIW.
  • Following the completion of Groundwork and the RIWs, workshop outputs were consolidated and integrated into an Inception Phase Report and into the fourth proposal version by the Dryland Systems Director, in consultation with the many partners who make up the CRP. The iIRT reports ranged were 100--180 pages in length, and in effect provide the first output of International Public Goods of the Dryland Systems CRP. They provide a wealth of biophysical and socioeconomic characterization data for the various SRT2 and SRT3 dryland systems. They also summarize constraints and opportunities, and describe potential partners, successes, and failures in the Target Regions. They also include an Implementation Phase section, which includes key research questions, hypotheses, impact pathways, and logframes with specific outputs, outcomes, and activities. On a very practical level, they therefore provide key information with which to revise the Dryland Systems CRP proposal and address the “must-haves” of the ISPC and FC.
  • The SRT 2 site extends from Northeastern Kenya up to Southeastern Ethiopia. It comprises Borana, Somalia and part of Afar states in Ethiopia and Marsabit, Garissa, Wajir, and Isiolo districts in Kenya.The SRT 3 site is the Chinyanja Triangle (CT) covering central and southern Malawi, the Eastern Province of Zambia, and the Tete Province of Mozambique.
  • Site SelectionWhen using the criteria laid down across the CRP, namely aridity, length of the growing period, rainfall variability, access to irrigation, land degradation and market access, it became apparent that Maharashtra, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh in India all have large SRT2 and SRT3 areas, while Rajasthan in India and Pakistan and Afghanistan are mainly SRT2. Based on a higher poverty index, pockets of Rajasthan and Andhra Pradesh are still important for SRT2, and much of Maharashtra and Karnataka for SRT3. Parts of Pakistan in the region of Chakwal have pockets of high poverty for both SRT2 and SRT3.
  • Aral Sea and Rasht and Kyzyl-Suu valleys for SRT 2 areas in the CA&C region. The Fergana Valley readily characterizes the SRT 3 areas in the Central Asia & Caucasus region. ClimatePrecipitationPrecipitation varies between the flat alluvial plain areas of the Fergana Valley which receive 150 to 250mm of precipitation per year and the mountains and foothills which receive between 300 and 600mm per year. There are two rainy seasons per year in the spring and autumn.  Number of days with precipitations (of 0.1 mm or more): Winter 19-23Spring 17-19Summer 5-8Autumn 10-12The coefficient of variation (CV) of annual precipitation in the region (n = 50) is 24-35%. TemperatureAverage annual temperatures range from 7-11°C in the foothills of the eastern part of the valley) and up to 14-15°C in the plains. Average maximum temperatures in July are from 34-35 ° C in the plains and up to 25-30°C in the foothills. The absolute maximum is 43.9°C. Average minimum temperatures in January are from -3° C - 2° C in the flat part and -9° C to -4°C in the foothills. The absolute minimum is – 28.7°C in the plains.SoilsIn the system of latitude soil-climatic zones, the flat part of the Fergana Valley is a desert area with gray-brown, sandy desert and takyr soils.According to the scheme of the provincial division, the Fergana Valley is included in the Central Asian soil and climatic province, which is characterized by continental climate (dry) and specific subtropical soils differ from soils of the more northern regions of Eurasia.In the irrigated lands in the Valley there are mainly medium loamy soils (43.8%), clay and loamy soils (21.0%), loamy (24.8%), sandy loamy and sandy soils (10.3%), stony gravel and crushed stone on the surface of the soil (0.1%).Land use and coverThe main crops in the Fergana Valley are cotton, wheat, vegetables, melons, orchards and vineyards, perennial plants, and other crops. The leading crop is cotton. The area under cotton covers 35-40% of the total area in the Andijan region. Land degradationIn Fergana valley salt affected soil is observed as 11.4% of total irrigated area.  Great damage to the national economy of the republic is caused by mudslides. Protection of land from wind and water erosions is one of the most pressing issues for further development of agricultural production, protection and improvement of land use. Water resourcesThe main sources of water in the Fergana Valley are:• The River Karadarya - mixed filling• The Naryn river - mixed filling• The Maylisay and Tentaksay - snow filling• The Syrdarya RiverAccording to the annual report of Narin-Kara-Dayra and Sokh-Syrdara River Basin Authority 95 to 96% of water, on low water years, is used for irrigation. In the Fergana Valley, the quality of irrigation water meets water quality requirements for irrigation. Salinity of water in the rivers and small streams is low. In the flood period in April and May), the silt content in rivers and small streams increases to a noticeable level especially in the foothill areas. Downstream silt content increases due to wastewater and channel deformations. At the south part of the Andijan region (Booz, Ulugnar, Balykchy), collected drainage water is used for irrigation as its salinity is low and it meets the requirements for irrigation.Farming systemsIn the mountains of Fergana Valley, the following crops are grown: natural feeds, almonds, walnuts and wild rose. In the foothills wheat, barley, alfalfa, sainfoin, horticultures, large fruits and potato are grown. On the plains wheat, cotton, tobacco, maize, potato, onion, carrot, beans, vegetables, melons, fruit and berry crops, alfalfa and greenhouse crops are grown. Livestock is an important part of the Fergana Valley’s agriculture, contributing to the insuring of the population with food and industries by the raw materials. Depending on the natural-climatic conditions of the region, livestock can be divided into intensive (industrial), extensive (grazing), and domestic. Dairy cattle breeding, poultry farming is concentrated in the suburban area of irrigation. Pasture livestock is concentrated in the area with the lowest natural resource potential on private lands.Depending on the natural-climatic conditions of the region it can be divided into intensive (industrial), extensive (grazing), and domestic livestock. Dairy cattle breeding and poultry farming is concentrated in the suburban irrigated area.Institutional Support and PoliciesThe Institute "Uzdaverloyiha" together with the research and project organizations of the republic developed a "scheme of erosion control measures in the Republic of Uzbekistan", which defines the series of measures on erosion control, and their scale and sequence of operations.
  • The SRT 2 site extends from Northeastern Kenya up to Southeastern Ethiopia. It comprises Borana, Somalia and part of Afar states in Ethiopia and Marsabit, Garissa, Wajir, and Isiolo districts in Kenya.The SRT 3 site is the Chinyanja Triangle (CT) covering central and southern Malawi, the Eastern Province of Zambia, and the Tete Province of Mozambique.
  • The two benchmark areas include south Jordan, Syria, south Turkey, and west and north Iraq for SRT2, and the high rainfall areas (>500 mm) of the northern parts of the Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia for SRT3.
  • Site SelectionWhen using the criteria laid down across the CRP, namely aridity, length of the growing period, rainfall variability, access to irrigation, land degradation and market access, it became apparent that Maharashtra, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh in India all have large SRT2 and SRT3 areas, while Rajasthan in India and Pakistan and Afghanistan are mainly SRT2. Based on a higher poverty index, pockets of Rajasthan and Andhra Pradesh are still important for SRT2, and much of Maharashtra and Karnataka for SRT3. Parts of Pakistan in the region of Chakwal have pockets of high poverty for both SRT2 and SRT3.
  • Aral Sea and Rasht and Kyzyl-Suu valleys for SRT 2 areas in the CA&C region. The Fergana Valley readily characterizes the SRT 3 areas in the Central Asia & Caucasus region. ClimatePrecipitationPrecipitation varies between the flat alluvial plain areas of the Fergana Valley which receive 150 to 250mm of precipitation per year and the mountains and foothills which receive between 300 and 600mm per year. There are two rainy seasons per year in the spring and autumn.  Number of days with precipitations (of 0.1 mm or more): Winter 19-23Spring 17-19Summer 5-8Autumn 10-12The coefficient of variation (CV) of annual precipitation in the region (n = 50) is 24-35%. TemperatureAverage annual temperatures range from 7-11°C in the foothills of the eastern part of the valley) and up to 14-15°C in the plains. Average maximum temperatures in July are from 34-35 ° C in the plains and up to 25-30°C in the foothills. The absolute maximum is 43.9°C. Average minimum temperatures in January are from -3° C - 2° C in the flat part and -9° C to -4°C in the foothills. The absolute minimum is – 28.7°C in the plains.SoilsIn the system of latitude soil-climatic zones, the flat part of the Fergana Valley is a desert area with gray-brown, sandy desert and takyr soils.According to the scheme of the provincial division, the Fergana Valley is included in the Central Asian soil and climatic province, which is characterized by continental climate (dry) and specific subtropical soils differ from soils of the more northern regions of Eurasia.In the irrigated lands in the Valley there are mainly medium loamy soils (43.8%), clay and loamy soils (21.0%), loamy (24.8%), sandy loamy and sandy soils (10.3%), stony gravel and crushed stone on the surface of the soil (0.1%).Land use and coverThe main crops in the Fergana Valley are cotton, wheat, vegetables, melons, orchards and vineyards, perennial plants, and other crops. The leading crop is cotton. The area under cotton covers 35-40% of the total area in the Andijan region. Land degradationIn Fergana valley salt affected soil is observed as 11.4% of total irrigated area.  Great damage to the national economy of the republic is caused by mudslides. Protection of land from wind and water erosions is one of the most pressing issues for further development of agricultural production, protection and improvement of land use. Water resourcesThe main sources of water in the Fergana Valley are:• The River Karadarya - mixed filling• The Naryn river - mixed filling• The Maylisay and Tentaksay - snow filling• The Syrdarya RiverAccording to the annual report of Narin-Kara-Dayra and Sokh-Syrdara River Basin Authority 95 to 96% of water, on low water years, is used for irrigation. In the Fergana Valley, the quality of irrigation water meets water quality requirements for irrigation. Salinity of water in the rivers and small streams is low. In the flood period in April and May), the silt content in rivers and small streams increases to a noticeable level especially in the foothill areas. Downstream silt content increases due to wastewater and channel deformations. At the south part of the Andijan region (Booz, Ulugnar, Balykchy), collected drainage water is used for irrigation as its salinity is low and it meets the requirements for irrigation.Farming systemsIn the mountains of Fergana Valley, the following crops are grown: natural feeds, almonds, walnuts and wild rose. In the foothills wheat, barley, alfalfa, sainfoin, horticultures, large fruits and potato are grown. On the plains wheat, cotton, tobacco, maize, potato, onion, carrot, beans, vegetables, melons, fruit and berry crops, alfalfa and greenhouse crops are grown. Livestock is an important part of the Fergana Valley’s agriculture, contributing to the insuring of the population with food and industries by the raw materials. Depending on the natural-climatic conditions of the region, livestock can be divided into intensive (industrial), extensive (grazing), and domestic. Dairy cattle breeding, poultry farming is concentrated in the suburban area of irrigation. Pasture livestock is concentrated in the area with the lowest natural resource potential on private lands.Depending on the natural-climatic conditions of the region it can be divided into intensive (industrial), extensive (grazing), and domestic livestock. Dairy cattle breeding and poultry farming is concentrated in the suburban irrigated area.Institutional Support and PoliciesThe Institute "Uzdaverloyiha" together with the research and project organizations of the republic developed a "scheme of erosion control measures in the Republic of Uzbekistan", which defines the series of measures on erosion control, and their scale and sequence of operations.
  • 1) Increasing resilience to biophysical and socioeconomic shocks despite marginal conditions; and 2) Sustainable intensification of production systems to reduce food insecurity and generate more income.
  • Provisional Intermediate Development Outcomes (IDOs)
  • Lead Center will have responsibility for governance, fiduciary oversight and financial management through the performance contract with the Consortium Board Steering Committee (SC), chaired by Lead Center, will include Directors General or representatives of participating CGIAR Centers, and a weighted representation of other partners (NARS, ARIs, development partners, etc.). SC will be responsible for overall direction of the CRP, monitoring and resource allocation.Research Management Committee (RMC), chaired by CRP Leader, will consist of the Coordinators of the Interdisciplinary Research Teams for each target region, and will be responsible for overall coordination and management of the research agendaCoordinators of Regional Interdisciplinary Teams will ensure that each SRT is effectively implemented, coordinated, delivered, and monitored/assessed within each target region, and through the RMC ensure that regional results are synthesized and integrated at a global scale. They will maintain strong relationships with partner institutions, donors and stakeholders in each region through the Regional Stakeholder Advisory Committees. Independent Scientific Advisors (ISA) will form a standing panel of world-class scientific experts on the main subjects of each SRT, provide advice on quality of science and oversight of SRTs across regions, ensuring that the implementation follows the conceptual framework of CRP1.1. They report to SC.CRP Leader will provide overall leadership in the R4D agenda in consultation with SC and RMC.
  • AASW6: Crp on dryland systems icarda caas, china 3 4 june, 2013 version 3 accra

    1. 1. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems The global research partnership to improve food security and livelihoods in the world's dry areas NSFC-CAAS-ICARDA-ICRISAT Workshop CAAS, Beijing, China 3-4 June, 2013 Mahmoud Solh Director General, ICARDA
    2. 2. Outline 1. The challenges of the dry areas; 2. The integrated production system approach in addressing the challenges facing dry areas; 3. The CGIAR Research Program (CRP) on Dryland Systems 4. The Inception Phase in 2012 and Program implementation 5. The outcome of the Launch Meeting of the CRP on Dryland Systems.
    3. 3. 1. Challenges of the dry areas
    4. 4. Drylands of the world
    5. 5. CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Agricultural Production Systems – Launch Meeting, Amman 21-23 May 2013 TitleProminant Features of Drylands
    6. 6. Dry Areas: Fragile Agro-Ecosystems  Physical water scarcity  Rapid natural resource degradation and desertification  Groundwater depletion  Drought  Salinity  Climate change -80 -70 -60 -50 -40 -30 -20 -10 1982 1985 1988 1991 1994 1997 2000 2003 2006 m Decrease of the Souss aquifer level in Morocco
    7. 7. Relative change of mean annual precipitation 1980/1999 to 2080/2099, scenario A1b, average of 21 GCMs (compiled by GIS Unit ICARDA, based on partial maps in Christensen et al., 2007) Climate Change: Relative change in mean annual precipitation 1980/1999 to 2080/2099
    8. 8. Absolute change of mean annual temperature 1980/1999 to 2080/2099, scenario A1b, average of 21 GCMs (compiled by GIS Unit ICARDA, based on partial maps in Christensen et al., 2007) Absolute change of mean annual temperature 1980/1999 to 2080/2099
    9. 9. Challenges to Food Security: Biotic Stresses Salinity Insect PestsFungi Diseases Weeds/Parasitic Weeds
    10. 10. Further Challenges to Food Security in the Developing Countries  Inadequate agricultural policies for sustainable agricultural development  Insufficient investment in agricultural research and development
    11. 11. 2. The integrated approach in addressing challenges facing dry areas
    12. 12. The integrated approach involving the three pillars of sustainable agricultural development in dry areas Socio-economic & policy, and institutional support Sustainable natural resource management and inputs Crop & livestock genetic improvement Integration at farm and field levels
    13. 13. ICARDA’s Research Programs Biodiversity and Crop Genetic Improvement Integrated Water and Land Management Sustainable Intensification of Production Systems Social, Economic and Policy Research
    14. 14. Improving Food Security and Livelihoods in Dry Areas: Investment in Two Major Agro-ecologies A. High Potential Dry Areas  Relative higher rainfall areas or areas where irrigation water is available: the approach to follow is sustainable intensification and diversification of production systems; B. Low Potential Dry Areas or Marginal Land  Low rainfall area where production system resilience and risk management is the approach to follow.
    15. 15. 3. The CGIAR Research Program on Dryland Systems
    16. 16. CRP on Drylands Systems: Integrated Agricultural Production Systems for Improving Food Security and Improving Livelihoods in Dry Areas Objectives:  Sustainable productivity growth and intensified production systems at the farm and landscape levels  More resilient dryland agro- ecosystems that can cope with climate variation and change  Less vulnerable and improved rural livelihoods  Agricultural innovations systems that improve the impact of research and development investments.
    17. 17. System Level Outputs  Reducing rural poverty;  Improving food security;  Improving nutrition and health; and  Sustainable management of natural resources.
    18. 18. CRP on Dryland Systems (cont’d) Two main target agro-ecosystems:  Most vulnerable systems & low potential areas  Systems with the greatest potential for impact & Potential Geographical Regions:  West African Sahel & Dry Savanna  Eastern & Southern Africa  North Africa & West Asia  Central Asia  South Asia
    19. 19. CRP on Drylands System: the integrated and participatory approach  Integrated agro-ecosystems approach to: • natural resource management • risk management & adaptation to climate change • crop, livestock, tree and fish production systems • enabling policy and institutional support  Demand driven, participatory and community- based approaches  Benchmark sites and pilot locations linked to other CRPs as platforms for up scaling  Research on effective partnership strategies for linking research with development.
    20. 20. CRP on Drylands System: Strategic Research Themes (SRTs) and their outputs SRT1: Approaches and models for strengthening innovation systems, building stakeholder innovation capacity, and linking knowledge to policy action; SRT2: Reducing vulnerability and managing risk through resilient production systems; SRT3: Sustainable intensification for more productive, profitable and diversified dryland agriculture with well-established linkages to markets; SRT4: Measuring impacts and cross-regional synthesis.
    21. 21. CRP on Dryland Systems: Action sites & benchmark areas Circles/ovals indicate the 5 Target Regions.
    22. 22. 4. The Inception Phase in 2012 and Program implementation
    23. 23. Target Regions (chosen through stakeholder meeting)  West African Sahel and dry savannas;  East and Southern Africa;  North Africa and West Asia;  Central Asia and the Caucasus; and  South Asia.
    24. 24. Inception Phase Activities 2012  Selection of Action and Satellite Sites  Groundwork to Characterize Benchmark Areas (two dryland system agro- ecologies) and Action Sites  Regional Inception Workshops  Interim Interdisciplinary Regional Team Reports
    25. 25. Interim Inter-disciplinary Regional Team Reports  Action site characterization for the two agro-ecologies of dryland systems;  Description of constraints and problems;  Hypotheses and major research questions;  Outputs, Outcomes, and activities;  Partners;  Impact Pathway and Logframe at regional level.
    26. 26. Regional Report for Western Africa & Dry Savannas  SRT2: the KKM (Kano- Katsina- Maradi) action transect  SRT3: the WBS (Wa- Bobo-Sikasso) action transect
    27. 27. Regional Report for East and Southern frica SRT 2 System Northeastern Kenya to Southeastern Ethiopia  Comprising Borana, Somalia and part of Afar states in Ethiopia;  Marsabit, Garissa, Wajir, and Isiolo districts in Kenya.
    28. 28. Regional Team Report for South Asia  SRT2 and SRT 3: Maharashtra, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh  SRT2: Rajasthan in India and Pakistan and Afghanistan
    29. 29. Central Asia/Caucasus Site SRT 2 Systems
    30. 30. Regional Report for East and Southern Africa (cont’d) SRT 3 SystemThe Chinyanja Triangle:  Comprising central and southern Malawi;  the Eastern Province of Zambia;  and the Tete Province of Mozambique.
    31. 31. North Africa and West Asia  SRT2: south Jordan, Syria, south Turkey, and west and north Iraq;  SRT3: High rainfall areas (>500 mm) of the northern parts of the Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia.
    32. 32. Regional Team Report for South Asia  SRT2 and SRT 3: Maharashtra, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh  SRT2: Rajasthan in India and Pakistan and Afghanistan
    33. 33. Central Asia/Caucasus Site SRT 2 Systems
    34. 34. Action locations of the CRP on Dryland Systems CRP1.1 Dryland Systems Action Sites
    35. 35. 5. The outcome of the Launch Meeting of the CRP on Dryland Systems
    36. 36. Opening Session of the Launch Meeting of the CRP on Dryland Systems
    37. 37.  Development of a global Program based on the outcome of Regional Inception Workshops;  Development of global logframe;  Development of Intermediate Development Outcomes across regions;  Meeting of Steering Committee;  Meeting of Independent Science Advisory Committee. Major Outputs of Launch Meeting
    38. 38. CRP on Drylands System: Intermediate Development Outcomes (IDOs) 1. More stable and higher per capita income for households (above an asset threshold) through sustainable intensification and diversification of production systems in higher potential dry areas; 2. More resilient livelihoods for vulnerable households in marginal lands; 3. Women and children in vulnerable households have year round access to greater quantity and diversity of food sources and better income ; 4. More sustainable and equitable management of land and water resources in pastoral and agro-pastoral systems;
    39. 39. CRP on Drylands System: Intermediate Development Outcomes (IDOs) 5. Impact through better functioning markets underpinning intensification and diversification of rural livelihoods; 6. More integrated, effective and connected service delivery institutions underpinning system intensification in rural areas; 7. Policy reform removing constraints and providing incentives rural households to engage in more sustainable practices that intensify and improve resilience
    40. 40. 5. Farmers and pastoralists (especially women) have better access to more diverse, efficient and equitable markets 6. More integrated, effective and connected service delivery institutions underpinning system intensification and resilience 7. Policy reform to remove constraints and improve incentives to rational management of natural resources 4. Multiple stakeholders in pastoral / agropastoral areas, use evidence based ecosystem management, at community level, in the governance of common and privately managed land and water resources 3. NARES and health sector organizations work together and adopt diagnostic and systematic research approaches to promoting and developing interventions to improve vulnerable women and children’s access to, and control of, more and more diverse food sources, throughout the year 1. NARES use tools, methods and processes to generate and customize improved resilience options for targeted groups of vulnerable households in marginal lands. 2. NARES use tools, methods and processes to generate and customize improved intensification options for targeted groups of households in relatively high potential areas. Interrelations among IDOs
    41. 41. Governance and management Team x CG Centers ARIs NARS Team 3 CG Centers ARIs NARS Team 2 CG Centers ARIs NARS Team 1 CG Centers ARIs NARS Organization of Dryland Systems Steering Committee Research Management Committee Coordinator Region 1 Coordinator Region 2 Coordinator Region 3 Coordinator Region x Leadership&Execution Consortium Board Lead Center: ICARDA Research Management Committee: CRP Leader (chair), Regional and Learning Site Coordinators Interdisciplinary Research Teams Performance Contract CRP Lead Center:ICARDA Steering Committee: CGIAR Center DGs; CRP Leader, NARS leaders, ARI leaders, development partners Regional Stakeholder Advisory Committees Independent Science Advisers
    42. 42. Governance  Participating Partner Agreements  Steering Committee (ICARDA + 3 CGIAR Centers + 3 NARSs + 2 ARIs + 3 Development Organizations + CRP Director)  Independent Science Advisory Committee (5 - 6 members)  Regional Management Committees  Regional Stakeholder Advisory Committees  Regional Science Advisory Committee
    43. 43. Global partners in the design, development and implementation of CRP on Dryland Systems International centers ICARDA Bioversity FAO ILRI WorldFish ICRISAT CIAT ICBA IWMI AVRDC CIP ICRAF SSA-CP Global and Regional Fora AARINENA CACAARI FORAGRO ASARECA CORAF/WECARD GFAR APAARI FARA National Research Institutions Afghanistan: MAIL Mali: INSAH/CILSS Bangladesh: BARI Morocco: INRA Brazil: EMBRAPA Niger: INRAN Burkina Faso: INERA Nigeria: ARC China: CAAS Pakistan: BARI, CSO, PARC, SSD Egypt: ARC South Africa: CSIR, Univ. of Ft Hare, WRC Ethiopia: EIAR, Arba Minch University Sudan: ARC France: CIRAD Syria: GCSAR, Agha Khan Foundation Ghana: ARI, CSIR Tajikistan: TAAS India: ICAR, CRIDA, CAZRI, FES, NRAA, Watershed Organization Trust Tunisia: IRA Turkmenistan: National Farmers’ Association, NAS Iran: AREEO Turkey: AARI Jordan: NCARE USA: USDA Kazakhstan: South-Western Scientific Production Center of Agriculture Uzbekistan: Kashkadarya Research Institute Kenya: KARI Zambia: University of Zambia
    44. 44. THANK YOU

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