A Kenya Agricultural Research Institute &
McGill University Project
Funded by IDRC/CIDA
Enhancing ecologically resilient f...
Key Messages
• PPATE – SPATE model has allowed the project to demonstrate
technologies and approaches that enhance resilie...
Definitions
• The project is innovating by adapting the existing
technologies and making sure that farmers use
them, worki...
The four elements of a resilience framework
DFID, 2012
Rationale for the project
Lower midlands 4 and 5: The
project focus region in Kenya
• 10% of Kenya’s land resources
– Clim...
Food security resilience: Conceptual framework
Equitable access
Participatory evaluations and
service provision model
Farmer groups
SPATE
SPATE
SPATE
• Primary participatory agric techno...
Participatory evaluations and service
provision model
•Attitude
•Perception
•Preferences
•Assessment of the performance of...
- 716 men and 1007 women
farmers trained on participatory
market identification in the local
area, assessment and planning...
- There are Institutions and private traders
willing to buy from farmers e.g.,
- 1 FRDA in Yatta planned for the market
an...
Business opportunity for the private sector
6 10.5
33
1 0
5
42
100
210
0
50
100
150
200
250
Jan to April 2011 Sept to Nov ...
• Building and sustaining up-scaling strategies through farmer to
farmer learning in the PPATE/SPATE Model
• Small scale f...
Key Messages
• PPATE – SPATE model has allowed the project to demonstrate
technologies and approaches that enhance resilie...
Acknowledgements
• CIFSRF through IDRC/CIDA
• GOK
• Partners (KEMRI, MOA, CASCADE Freshco Seeds Company, KSU)
• Farming co...
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Enhancing ecologically resilient food security through Innovative farming systems in semi-arid areas

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  • There are many examples of DRR frameworks – this one is from DFID – all have the same goal of mitigation, preparing and adapting communities to disasters and to allow communities to build back better after shocks
  • Enhancing ecologically resilient food security through Innovative farming systems in semi-arid areas

    1. 1. A Kenya Agricultural Research Institute & McGill University Project Funded by IDRC/CIDA Enhancing ecologically resilient food security through Innovative farming systems in the semi-arid midlands of Kenya Esther Njuguna, Lutta Muhammad, Gordon Hickey, Leigh Brownhill, Bernard Pelletier, Festus Murithi, John Wambua, Josiah Gitari
    2. 2. Key Messages • PPATE – SPATE model has allowed the project to demonstrate technologies and approaches that enhance resilience in the farming systems to many farmers within a short time • Traditional crops demonstrated to have the potential of becoming cash crops for farmers in semi arid areas • Farmers and traders in the semi arid areas have opportunities to grow business deals if they talk to each other • There are opportunities for the private sector to make business providing certified seeds of neglected crops to the small scale farmers: some lessons from Freshco Seeds Company.
    3. 3. Definitions • The project is innovating by adapting the existing technologies and making sure that farmers use them, working across institutions • Resilience is the ability of people, households, communities, countries, and systems to mitigate, adapt to, and recover from shocks and stresses in a manner that reduces chronic vulnerability and facilitates inclusive growth (USAID 2012)
    4. 4. The four elements of a resilience framework DFID, 2012
    5. 5. Rationale for the project Lower midlands 4 and 5: The project focus region in Kenya • 10% of Kenya’s land resources – Climatic shocks (rainfall, amounts, distribution, re liability) – Natural shocks (degraded soils) – Production shocks (low yields) – Market shocks (access, prices) – Demographic shocks (population increase, migration of labour, health) • Many years of research and development interventions • But low adoption rates, low impacts
    6. 6. Food security resilience: Conceptual framework Equitable access
    7. 7. Participatory evaluations and service provision model Farmer groups SPATE SPATE SPATE • Primary participatory agric technology evaluations •Secondary participatory agric technology evaluations 54 PPATE groups - 1253 farmers (498 male, 755 female) 216 SPATE groups in 7 districts in 3 counties, 5400 Households Sorghum, Cowpeas, Green grams, Millet, Maize, Pigeon peas, Beans, Dolichos Lablab, Cassava, Forages, Natural Pastures improvement All the 54 farmer groups prioritized indigenous chicken 67 service provides trained on improved management; vaccinating against new castle diseases.
    8. 8. Participatory evaluations and service provision model •Attitude •Perception •Preferences •Assessment of the performance of technologies •Adoption of subsets
    9. 9. - 716 men and 1007 women farmers trained on participatory market identification in the local area, assessment and planning - 18 Market opportunity groups formed to facilitate sets of 3 farmer groups (FRDAs) in market planning - Indigenous chicken, green-grams and cowpeas identified as priority products for marketing Traditional crops as cash crops Enterprise Scores Indigenous chicken 16 Green grams 19 Beans 2 Millets 4 Sorghums 1 Cowpeas 10 Pigeons peas 6 Dolichos 2 Maize 2 Cassava 1
    10. 10. - There are Institutions and private traders willing to buy from farmers e.g., - 1 FRDA in Yatta planned for the market and collectively sold green grams to traders worth KSh 850,000 (USD 10,000); Saw price of green grams increase from KSh 40/kg for an individual to KSh 55/kg when traders collected the produce from a group - Produce sold to local traders identified in the PMSD exercise - Chicken sold every 2 months to highest bidder, prices raised from 3.75USD to 6.80USD per bird Market Access in the semi arids
    11. 11. Business opportunity for the private sector 6 10.5 33 1 0 5 42 100 210 0 50 100 150 200 250 Jan to April 2011 Sept to Nov 2011 Jan to Apr 2012 AmountofcertifiedseedssoldinMetricTons The amounts of certified seeds sold by Freshco Seeds for 3 seasons in the 7 districts where the project is implemented Cowpeas Green Grams Pigeon peas Dolichos Lablab Sorghum Beans Maize -Farmers pooled Ksh 72000 to buy fertilizers -Farmers raised over 100000 to buy certified seeds from KARI katumani -Opportunities to use the PPATE groups are seed Distribution agents being considered
    12. 12. • Building and sustaining up-scaling strategies through farmer to farmer learning in the PPATE/SPATE Model • Small scale farmers participation in markets: aggregation, standards and storage • Stakeholder coordination around identified compelling agendas for food security resilience • Sustaining resilience in scale and over time for vulnerable households • Priority policy interventions in collaboration with local county gov’ts Priorities for further action
    13. 13. Key Messages • PPATE – SPATE model has allowed the project to demonstrate technologies and approaches that enhance resilience in the farming systems to many farmers within a short time • Traditional crops demonstrated to have the potential of becoming cash crops for farmers in semi arid areas • Farmers and traders in the semi arid areas have opportunities to grow business deals if they talk to each other • There are opportunities for the private sector to make business providing certified seeds of neglected crops to the small scale farmers: some lessons from Freshco Seeds Company.
    14. 14. Acknowledgements • CIFSRF through IDRC/CIDA • GOK • Partners (KEMRI, MOA, CASCADE Freshco Seeds Company, KSU) • Farming communities in Tharaka, Makueni and Machakos counties of Kenya • Dedicated researchers in KARI Katumani and KARI Embu • Research assistants in the field • FARA audience today • Thank you

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