Food losses footprint highlights

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Reducing food wastage footprint is crucial to conserve natural resources as a basis for food security
Food wastage assessment should include the socio-environmental impacts in order to fully understand the cost and benefit of reduction options, and investment requirements
Environmental issues and related social costs (e.g. health, public mitigation costs) must be considered for efficient food loss reduction strategies, they do have an “hidden” cost born by society at large.
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  • The later in the life cycle a food product is wasted, the greater the impact on the environment of its useless production and transformation. This mechanism is taken into account in the model for the quantification of climate impacts.
  • Explanations: see technical report for details regarding the water intensities of each commodity
    The average water footprint per tonne of primary crop differs significantly among crops. Crops with a high yield or large fraction of crop biomass that is harvested generally have a smaller water footprint per tonne (e.g. starchy roots, fruits or vegetables) than crops with a low yield or small fraction of crop biomass harvested (e.g. cereals, oilcrops).
  • Food losses footprint highlights

    1. 1. Food losses footprint highlights Natural Resources and Environment Department 11 December 2013
    2. 2. Food Wastage Footprint Impact Drivers Direct use of natural resources (water, land, energy,…) increasing scarcities Inp ut Distribution Processing Consumption Postharv. handling and storage Agricultural production Indirect use of natural resources via the manufacturing of inputs and the machinery End of life Output Pollution (GHG emissions, fertilizer run-off, landfill leakages,…) t Inpu 2
    3. 3. Food Wastage Footprint Yearly Environmental Impacts 3.7 Gt CO2eq/year = 3rd largest emitter if food wastage was a country 36 EJ/ Year = ½ USA Energy production/ Year CO2 250 km3/year = 3 times Geneva lake 1.5 billion ha to grow food which ends up lost/wasted = 28% of agricultural land 66% of endangered/vulnerable species threatened by food production
    4. 4. Origins of the environmental impacts Value Chain Environmental impacts arise all along the agriculture value chain 4 3 Distribution Distribution Processing Processing Postharvest 2Postharv. handling handling and and storage storage Agricultural 1 Agricultural production production Consumption 5 Consumption End of life 6 End of life Sources of food wastage (stages 1 to 5) and sources of environmental impacts (stages 1 to 6) in the food life cycle. 4
    5. 5. Origins of the environmental impacts Value Chain The agricultural phase is always the most impacting phase Carbon footprint at consumption phase with respective contribution of embedded life-cycle phases 17,4% Agricultural production 45,4% Postharvest handling and Storage & Processing Distribution Consumption 27,8% End-of- ife L 4,8% 4,6% 5
    6. 6. Origins of the environmental impacts Commodities Wastage volume/footprint relationship is not linear Cereals and fruits contribute to 52 % and 18% of total water footprint Animal product have high footprints 60% 60% Contribution of each commodity to food wastage and blue water footprint Contribution of each commodity to food wastage and blue water footprint 50% 50% 40% 40% ll aa tt ff oo %% 30% 30% 20% 20% 10% 10% 0% 0% Cereals (excluding Cereals (excluding beer) beer) Commodity 1 Commodity 1 Starchy roots Starchy roots Commodity 2 Commodity 2 Oilcrops & Pulses Oilcrops & Pulses Fruits (excluding Meat Fruits (excluding Meat wine) wine) Commodity 3 Commodity 4 Commodity 5 Commodity 3 Commodity 4 Commodity 5 Food wastage Blue water footprint Food wastage Blue water footprint Milk (excluding Milk (excluding butter) & Eggs butter) & Eggs Commodity 7 Commodity 7 Vegetables Vegetables Commodity 8 Commodity 8 6
    7. 7. Origins of the environmental impacts Geography Depending on the region, the commodity footprint differs Top 10 of "region * commodity" pairs for carbon footprint + contribution to food wastage volume Contributing to 60% of total carbon footprint and 39% of total food wastage 16% 14% 12% 10% l a t f o % 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% Ind. Asia * Cereals S&SE Asia * Cereals Ind. Asia * Veg. Ind. Asia * Europe * Veg. NA&Oce * Meat Meat Carbon footprint LA * Meat Europe * Meat Europe * Cereals S&SE Asia * Veg. Food wastage volume 7
    8. 8. Origins of the environmental impacts Footprint Hotspot Example Loss of cereals in South/South East Asia emerges as a significant hotspot rice and wheat CO2 8
    9. 9. Food Loss Particularities Usually at the beginning of the value chain due to pre and post harvest capacity issues : • • • • • Unforseen climatic events Lack of agronomy capacity (pest control, proper harvesting techniques,…) Lack of proper storage facilities Lack of processing units Lack of distribution infrastructure More linked to developing countries where process and market value chains are less developed Loss usually touches the most vulnerable and the ones who can not afford to have a reduced access to natural resources 9
    10. 10. Food Loss Food Security Food Loss = double negative effect on food insecurity Direct impact on availability Less food available for consumption Increased scarcities of Natural Resources at the basis of production 10
    11. 11. Food Loss Inverted Pyramid
    12. 12. Food Loss Reduce Improving management and infrastructures Example: Solar technology to reduce food loss SOLAR DRYERS FOOD LOSS REDUCTION In a West Africa project, one dryer = 3.75 tons of mangoes saved = 0.86 tCO2eq saved = 1 133m3 saved = children saved through less Vitamin A deficiency SOLAR REFRIGERATORS PASTEURIZER UNITS
    13. 13. Food Loss Reuse Reusing for food or feed Gleaning "The biggest value to the farm is that product that was raised for the purpose of consumption, is consumed" Rod Parker, general manager, Parker Farms in Oak Grove, Virginia, USA, volunteers collect up to 900 kg of produce/day = 2 173 kgCO2eq and 85 000 m3 of water
    14. 14. Food Loss Recycle/Recover 143 kg CO2eq 236 kg CO2eq
    15. 15. Food Wastage Footprint Balancing Act Importance local full cost-benefits analysis 15
    16. 16. Conclusions Reducing food wastage footprint is crucial to conserve natural resources as a basis for food security Food wastage assessment should include the socioenvironmental impacts in order to fully understand the cost and benefit of reduction options, and investment requirements Environmental issues and related social costs (e.g. health, public mitigation costs) must be considered for efficient food loss reduction strategies, they do have an “hidden” cost born by society at large 16
    17. 17. THANK YOU http://www.fao.org/nr/sustainability/food-loss-and-waste/en/

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