Desert Locust Management (ICE2012, Daegu, Korea)
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Desert Locust Management (ICE2012, Daegu, Korea)

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The UN FAO Senior Locust Forecasting Officer, Keith Cressman, gave a 30-minute keynote presentation on Desert Locust management at the 24th International Congress of Entomology (ICE2012), Daegu, South ...

The UN FAO Senior Locust Forecasting Officer, Keith Cressman, gave a 30-minute keynote presentation on Desert Locust management at the 24th International Congress of Entomology (ICE2012), Daegu, South Korea (19-25 August 2012). An overview of Desert Locust biology and population dynamics, economics and FAO's early warning system are presented.

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Desert Locust Management (ICE2012, Daegu, Korea) Desert Locust Management (ICE2012, Daegu, Korea) Presentation Transcript

  • Desert Locust (harmless)
  • Desert Locust (dangerous)
  • Tracking locusts FAO’s early warning systemKeith CressmanSenior Locust Forecasting OfficerRome
  • the problem
  • Recession - calm period 25 countrieslocusts are usually present somewhere within 16 million km 2 ( 1.6 billion ha )
  • Plague 50 countrieslocusts invade up to 20% of Earth’s land mass 32 million km 2
  • adult(swarms) 1 25 days egg 10 days 2 hopper 3 (bands) 40 days Desert Locusts live 3 - 6 months
  • plague control fails good rains upsurge rains fail good control control fails good rains outbreak decline good rainsrecession plagues evolve
  • individual group band GREGARIZATIONas hoppers increase they change their behaviour
  • individual group swarm GREGARIZATIONas adults increase they change their behaviour
  • countries irregular recessions and plagues (1860 - 2011)
  • 2003 – 2005 the worst situation in 15 yearsit took $500 million & Mother Nature to stop this
  • southern Mauritania invasion (early summer 2004)
  • northern Senegal invasion (early summer 2004)
  • Morocco invasion (October 2004)
  • Cairo invasion (17 November 2004)
  • the economics
  • 1,100 = 35,000 20a1 km2 Desert Locust swarm 6eats the same food in 1 day as ...
  • Paris 38 million/day FRANCE/2 DAYS New York City 42 million/day USA/1 WEEK Sydney 422 million/day AUSTRALIA/1.5 HOURS
  • Control ops in 23 countries October 2003 - November 2005 13 million hectares ha
  • Emergency funding delay US$ million FAO appeal $74.8m 4 months 50 funds received 7 months 9 FAO TCP2004 2005
  • 13 - 200 control / ha millions spent by320 + 80 affected countries + FAO/donors 100 millions spent on food aid
  • 8.4 millionpeople affected in West Africa80-100 % cereal loss 85-90 % legume loss 33-85 % pasture loss
  • Debthousehold heads became indebted 60 % mauritania 45 % mali 33 % burkina faso
  • $90 millionfood aid in West Africa, 2004 90 % burkina faso 75 % mali 65 % mauritania households receiving aid
  • $1 million saves $100 million $100M$ millions after 12 months $50M after 10 months $10M after $5M 7 months $1M after after 4 months the last plague in 1 month West Africa 2003 2004
  • $ 570 MILLION control operations (2003-2005)$ 3.3 MILLION annual cost preventive control W & NW Africa170 years of preventive control
  • the solution
  • Desert Locust early warning systemFAO Desert Locust Information Service National Locust Control Centre National field teams
  • FAO Locust early warning network front-line secondary invasion
  • Field data to National Locust Centre Inmarsat Internet serverGPS 2 satellite transmission lat/long 1 email 3 eLocust2 RAMSES
  • Internet access to field data in real time latest position see work rate ID gaps on your PC 24/7 secure
  • RAMSES GIS at National Locust Centres DATA DISPLAY DATA ENTRY
  • SWARMSGIS at FAO DLIS (Rome)
  • Locust Mapper simple access to GIS data via Internet www.fao.org/ag/locusts
  • informing people calm caution threat dangerwww.fao.org/ag/locusts
  • advanced warning provided by FAO/DLIS, Rome warning reliabilityoutbreaks less than 1 month low-moderateupsurges up to 3 months lowplagues up to 6 months moderate-high
  • Sustaining effective national surveillance ... motivated individuals (energetic, curious) well trained teams (survey, data collection) well equipped teams (GPS, vehicles) financial support (national budget, incentives) becomes routine teams receive feedback data ownership
  • a successful early warning system regular surveillance & accurate GPS field data rapid data transmission & easy access complete GIS analysis simple well-targeted outputs use social mediaKeith Cressman www.fao.org/ag/locustsSenior Locust Forecasting Officer, Rome www.facebook.com/faolocustkeith.cressman@fao.org twitter.com/faolocust