Images in Heritage and Culture

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See how the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew used Extensis Portfolio Server to create a centralized web-based repository for efficient finding and sharing of assets, thereby ensuring history is preserved for decades to come.

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Images in Heritage and Culture

  1. 1. IMAGES IN HERITAGE & CULTURE ’11Diversity<br />Fiona Bradley<br />Head of Design and Photography, <br />Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew<br />Wednesday, 23rd March 2011<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3.
  4. 4. Kew Gardens and Wakehurst <br /><ul><li>800 staff working across the organisation
  5. 5. Science, horticulture, conservation, visitor attraction
  6. 6. Defra
  7. 7. To inspire and deliver science-based plant conservation worldwide, enhancing the quality of life.
  8. 8. 1.5 million visitors to both gardens with nearly 4 million web visits
  9. 9. Microsoft, Adobe, TOAD, Extensis
  10. 10. Windows, Macintosh and Unix</li></ul>3<br />
  11. 11.
  12. 12. Head of Design and Photography<br /><ul><li>Providing support for the organisation
  13. 13. Design mostly for visitor attraction, fundraising and publishing
  14. 14. Photography for events, festivals, art and books from archives , Kew’s scientific work, retail, web
  15. 15. In house photographic image collection over 150,000
  16. 16. Commercial image library</li></ul>5<br />
  17. 17. Millennium Seed Bank Partnership<br />
  18. 18.
  19. 19. Conservation<br /><ul><li>Kew's Millennium Seed Bank Partnership is the largest ex situ plant conservation project in the world.
  20. 20. Photographs of collecting, habitats, plants and seeds as well as the scientific work in the laboratories and the actual building
  21. 21. A great need for image management
  22. 22. 9000 fully data based in Portfolio taken by a variety of staff
  23. 23. Images used for publicity, education, scientific research and to generate revenue
  24. 24. Available to staff </li></ul>8<br />
  25. 25.
  26. 26. Preserved plant specimens<br />
  27. 27.
  28. 28. Preserved plant specimens<br />For taxonomic study<br /><ul><li>Collections accessible online
  29. 29. Reduce manual handling of specimens
  30. 30. Provide a secure digital back up of specimens
  31. 31. Digitisation projects funded by Andrew W. Mellon foundation
  32. 32. Available through our website and Jstor
  33. 33. www.kew.org/herbcat
  34. 34. www.jstor.org</li></ul>12<br />
  35. 35.
  36. 36. Preserved plant specimens<br /><ul><li>Scanned by inverted A3 flatbed scanner
  37. 37. Bulky or those larger than A3 specimens photographed
  38. 38. Team of 14 digitisers
  39. 39. 200,000 scanned to date
  40. 40. Scanned as 600 dpi tiffs
  41. 41. File size 200 mb
  42. 42. Metadata exists in two places
  43. 43. Image metadata in TOAD
  44. 44. Subject metadata in Herbcat http://apps.kew.org/herbcat/navigator.do</li></ul>14<br />
  45. 45. Photographs<br />
  46. 46.
  47. 47. For promotional and fundraising purposes<br /><ul><li>Two in house photographers and other staff
  48. 48. Images used for promotion, information, education, print publishing, web, revenue generation
  49. 49. Nikon cameras most widely used
  50. 50. Photographs saved as DNG (Adobe digital negative)
  51. 51. Images size 10 – 250 mb
  52. 52. IPTC metadata on import plus keywords embedded using Adobe Lightroom and Portfolio
  53. 53. In use daily by multiple designers and picture researchers for searching and downloading
  54. 54. Search and retrieval speed vital</li></ul>17<br />
  55. 55. Directors’ correspondence<br />
  56. 56.
  57. 57. Directors’ correspondence<br /><ul><li>One of the largest collections from Kew’s official archives
  58. 58. More than 40,500 images digitised, dating back to 1840’s
  59. 59. Unique resource containing first hand accounts and observations on botany, ethnobotany, history, natural history, science and politics
  60. 60. Used for historical, botanical, scientific and political research as well as members of the public
  61. 61. Funded by Andrew W. Mellon Foundation</li></ul>20<br />
  62. 62. Directors’ correspondence<br /><ul><li>A team of four digitisation officers
  63. 63. Each item is first catalogued
  64. 64. The digitally imaged using a flatbed scanner or camera
  65. 65. Images scanned at 300 dpi tiffs
  66. 66. 84 mb tiff files
  67. 67. Each item read in detail
  68. 68. Important Metadata: people, date, places, subject, plant names, increasing access and awareness
  69. 69. Available in house and from JSTOR Plant science website (http://plants.jstor.org/) </li></ul>21<br />
  70. 70. Art<br />
  71. 71. The Need for Content <br />Kew’s collection art and artefacts<br /><ul><li>Each item is catalogued
  72. 72. Digitally imaged using a flatbed scanner or camera
  73. 73. Each item read in detail
  74. 74. Images scanned at 600ppi / 300 ppi tiffs
  75. 75. Funded by Andrew W Mellon Foundation</li></ul>23<br />
  76. 76. Kew’s art collection<br /><ul><li>Over 200,000 prints, drawings and paintings in the library
  77. 77. 8 - 10,000 digitised on request from researchers or for commercial use
  78. 78. Some have been digitisation projects for example, Roxburgh and Marianne North
  79. 79. Flat artwork scanned using Epson 10000XL A3 flatbed scanner
  80. 80. Books photographed using a specific unit made up of a iCAM book cradle and Cambo Camera, Leaf Aptus – II 10 digital back
  81. 81. Basic embedded metadata is added by photographer
  82. 82. Images generally unavailable</li></ul>24<br />
  83. 83. Collections<br />Marianne North paintings<br /><ul><li>Over 800 paintings, photographed after restoration
  84. 84. Cambo Camera and Leaf Aptus – II 10 digital back
  85. 85. Metadata being embedded by a volunteer using Adobe Bridge
  86. 86. Available on commercial image library</li></ul>Roxburgh<br /><ul><li>Over 2500 illustrations - all digitised
  87. 87. Photographed using Sinar back
  88. 88. Team of four catalogued using TOAD
  89. 89. Available online, used by scientists, commercially desirable</li></ul>25<br />
  90. 90.
  91. 91.
  92. 92. Evidence of success and future goals<br /><ul><li>Importance of digital asset management is recognised
  93. 93. Obtaining large scale external funding
  94. 94. Training existing staff and employing project teams
  95. 95. Developing procedures tailored to subject matter
  96. 96. To establish a long term corporate approach to image management and have the tools to support it
  97. 97. Phase out manual processes and duplication of effort and content
  98. 98. DAM becomes the system of choice </li></ul>28<br />
  99. 99. Tips & tricks<br /><ul><li>Ensure the most appropriate hard and software is used
  100. 100. Establish a relevant directory structure
  101. 101. All users to be trained in effective use of systems
  102. 102. Metadata should be ample and relevant for the collection
  103. 103. Make use of available online tools for keywording
  104. 104. Archive and back up centrally
  105. 105. Ensure that the assets are used</li></ul>29<br />
  106. 106. Why?<br /><ul><li>Safety of collections by reducing handling
  107. 107. Insurance against loss or damage
  108. 108. To make our information more accessible
  109. 109. Desire to develop revenue streams
  110. 110. Capitalise on funding opportunities
  111. 111. To fulfill the demand around the organsiation for DAM</li></ul>30<br />
  112. 112. Future improvements for Portfolio<br /><ul><li>To keep track of data integrity such as detecting duplicates or corruption
  113. 113. To search multiple catalogues quickly
  114. 114. Easier creation of custom fields
  115. 115. Reporting on usage
  116. 116. To interface with Oracle UCM
  117. 117. Exporting to pre defined colour and file types</li></ul>31<br />
  118. 118. Thank you!<br />32<br />

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