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Excretory System

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  • 1.  The excretory system is a passive biological system that removes excess, unnecessary materials from an organism, so as to help maintain homeostasis within the organism and prevent damage to the body. It is responsible for the elimination of the waste products of metabolism as well as other liquid and gaseous wastes, as urine and as a component of sweat and exhalation. As most healthy functioning organs produce metabolic and other wastes, the entire organism depends on the function of the system; however, only the organs specifically for the excretion process are considered a part of As it involves several functions that are only superficially related, it is not usually used in more formal classifications of anatomy or function.
  • 2.  The excretory system removes metabolic and liquid toxic wastes as well as excess water from the organism, in the form of urine. The excretory system is a passive biological system that removes excess and unnecessary materials from an organism, so as to help maintain homeostasis within the organism and prevent damage to the body. It is responsible for the elimination of the waste products of metabolism as well as other liquid and gaseous wastes. As most healthy functioning organs produce metabolic and other wastes, the entire organism depends on the function of the system; however, only the organs specifically for the excretion process are considered a part of the excretory system. As your body performs the many functions that it needs in order to keep itself alive, it produces wastes. These wastes are chemicals that are toxic and that if left alone would seriously hurt or even kill you. For example, as your cells break down amino acids, they produce a dangerous toxin known as ammonia. Your liver converts the ammonia to another substance, called urea. The urea is turned into urine in the kidneys and is then carried in the ureters to the bladder.
  • 3.  Skin is an excretory organ. Although regulation of body temperature causes it to produce sweat which contain urea and other waste with salts too but the secretion of any type of waste for any purpose from the body is called excretion even if it is surplus water.
  • 4.  Main article: Lungs One of the main functions of the lungs is to diffuse gaseous wastes, such as carbon dioxide, from the bloodstream as a normal part of respiration.
  • 5.  Main article: Kidneys The kidneys primary function is the elimination of waste from the bloodstream by production of urine. They perform several homeostatic functions such as:- Maintain volume of extracellular fluid Maintain ionic balance in extracellular fluid Maintain pH and osmotic concentration of the extracellular fluid. Excrete toxic metabolic by-products such as urea, ammonia, and uric acid. The way the kidneys do this is with nephrons. There are over 1 million nephrons in each kidney, these nephrons act as filters inside the kidneys. The kidneys filter needed materials and waste, the needed materials go back into the bloodstream, and unneeded materials becomes urine and is gotten rid of. In some cases, excess wastes crystallize as kidney stones. They grow and can become a painful irritant that may require surgery or ultrasound treatments. Some stones are small enough to be forced into the urethra.
  • 6.  The ureters are muscular ducts that propel urine from the kidneys to the urinary bladder. In the human adult, the ureters are usually 25–30 cm (10–12 in) long. In humans, the ureters arise from the renal pelvis on the medial aspect of each kidney before descending towards the bladder on the front of the psoas major muscle. The ureters cross the pelvic brim near the bifurcation of the iliac arteries (which they run over). This "pelviureteric junction" is a common site for the impaction of kidney stones (the other being the uteterovesical valve). The ureters run posteriorly on the lateral walls of the pelvis. They then curve anteriormedially to enter the bladder through the back, at the vesicoureteric junction, running within the wall of the bladder for a few centimeters. The backflow of urine is prevented by valves known as ureterovesical valves. In the female, the ureters pass through the mesometrium on the way to the bladder.
  • 7.  The urinary bladder is the organ that collects urine excreted by the kidneys prior to disposal by urination. It is a hollow muscular, and distensible (or elastic) organ, and sits on the pelvic floor. Urine enters the bladder via the ureters and exits via the urethra. Embryologically, the bladder is derived from the urogenital sinus, and it is initially continuous with the allantois. In human males, the base of the bladder lies between the rectum and the pubic symphysis. It is superior to the prostate, and separated from the rectum by the rectovesical excavation. In females, the bladder sits inferior to the uterus and anterior to the vagina. It is separated from the uterus by the vesicouterine excavation. In infants and young children, the urinary bladder is in the abdomen even when empty.
  • 8.  In anatomy, the (from Greek - ourethra) is a tube which connects the urinary bladder to the outside of the body. In humans, the urethra has an excretory function in both genders to pass .
  • 9.  Within the kidney, blood first passes through the afferent artery to the capillary formation called a glomerulus and is collected in the Bowmans capsule, which filters the blood from its contents—primarily food and wastes. After the filtration process, the blood then returns to collect the food nutrients it needs, while the wastes pass into the collecting duct, to the renal pelvis, and to the ureter, and are then secreted out of the body via the urinary bladder.
  • 10.  Thanks For Reading ^_^ Add me on FaceBook: markysantos28@yahoo.com