Mobile Identity Whitepaper
 

Mobile Identity Whitepaper

on

  • 1,676 views

Using the mobile phone to build trust and confidence for the distribution of financial services primarily in emerging markets.

Using the mobile phone to build trust and confidence for the distribution of financial services primarily in emerging markets.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,676
Views on SlideShare
1,584
Embed Views
92

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
57
Comments
0

8 Embeds 92

http://www.exicon.mobi 78
http://www.linkedin.com 7
http://exicon.mobi 2
http://www.lmodules.com 1
http://exicon.arnelestanislao.com 1
http://exiconbeta.arnelestanislao.com 1
http://msi-dev.exicon.mobi 1
http://msi-test.exicon.mobi 1
More...

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Mobile Identity Whitepaper Mobile Identity Whitepaper Document Transcript

  • Fall 08   USING THE MOBILE PHONE TO BUILD TRUST AND    CONFIDENCE FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF   FINANCIAL SERVICES PRIMARILY IN EMERGING  MARKETS                                  Stefan Rust  stefanrust@exicon.mobi   @srust99    28 Aug 2009  
  •     Table of Contents      Executive Summary ........................................................................................................... 3      Current Identity verification standards & problems ............................................. 4      I.  The benefits ............................................................................................................................ 5    II.  Target market sizing – mobile phone penetration in developing countries . 5    III.  Solution & Concept ........................................................................................................... 7  .   a.  Capture the identity of an individual .................................................................................... 7  .   b.  Authentication of data & identity ........................................................................................... 9    c.  Continuous interaction & updating ..................................................................................... 10    d.  Scoring the identity ................................................................................................................... 11    e.  Profile exchange .......................................................................................................................... 12      The Plan .............................................................................................................................. 14      IV.  The System .........................................................................................................................  4  1   V.  Business model ..................................................................................................................  4 1   VI.  Investment Proposition .............................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.              2 
  •   Executive Summary    At  the  core  of  every  economy,  establishing  the  identity  of  an  individual  is  a  top  priority.   ‐ Countries use passports or ID cards,   ‐ Internet destinations use email addresses and user names,   ‐ Credit card companies use bank details and card numbers  ‐ Mobile phone operators use SIM cards and IMEI numbers    Knowing  your  customers,  citizens  or  community  members  permits  insights  into  behavior patterns which in turn establish trends and build a users track record and  profile.  These  insights  enable  the  extension  and  offering  of    services  including  financial  products  to  consumers,  entrepreneurs  and  the  general  population.  All  parties  benefit  from  these  increased  insights  and  the  resulting  increase  in  flow  of  services including financial products.     In emerging markets consumers and businesses alike have little or no access to user  information  beyond  their  direct  and  immediate  circle  of  Friends  or  Family.  Particularly  when  it  comes  to  financial  services  and  products  in  order  to for  these  services  to  proliferate  healthily  the  identity  and  associated    financial  history  are  crucial.     Being able to identify and verify individuals with insight into their financial history  and  transactions  increases  the  level  of  trust  and  builds  confidence  which  in  turn  encourages  confidence  amongst  the  financial  services  industry  to  extend  micro  lending and alternative financial products and services.  We  suggest  building  out  a  system  that  leverages  mobile  networks  and  individual  mobile  numbers  as  a key  means to  establish  user  identities  and thus  help  develop  emerging market economies.    This document attempts to address at a high level  ‐ how to capture identity information using mobile numbers  ‐ how to augment this information using mobile related information from the  services they subscribe to and the agent networks  ‐ Using the mobile as a means to provide authentication and verification.  ‐ Extending  this  information  in  an  opt‐in  federated  model  to  industry  participants    This  document  acts  as  an  outline  and  summary  for  a  detailed  business  case  and  further  deep  dives  into  the  model,  roadmap  and  key  milestones  to  creating  a  successful implementation.         3 
  •   Current Identity verification standards & problems     Managing  risk  is  critical  to  any  financial  institution.  Huge  institutions  and  departments exist to assess acceptable levels of risk and return, all based upon long,  detailed  financial  histories  and  multiple  sources  of  information.  Additionally,  in  many countries, government restrictions and policies require detailed identification  for any type of financial transactions, "know your customer" (KYC).    Confidence  in  an  individual`s  identity  and  knowing  exactly  whom  money  is  being  lent  to,  and  if  that  person  is  really  who  they  claim  to  be,  is  found  to  be  of  more  relevance than the financial position of that individual. Thus, even without a credit  rating  or  score,  the  lender  may  still  consider  lending  money  to  a  customer  with  a  high “identity confidence score”.    Presently, particularly in developing countries, those living in poverty do not have  identification of any kind let alone (ID) cards (e.g., driver`s licenses, social security  number  (SSN)  cards,  military  IDs,  etc.)  and  identity  verification  systems  are  marginal  at  best.  Out  of  the  192  UN  members  only  about  100  countries  have  a  national ID card system and, notably, almost none of the Commonwealth countries.  Yet all of the 192 countries have some level of mobile telecom services.    According to the World bank (Aug, 2008), around 25% of the people in developing  countries  are  living  below  the  poverty  line.  Below  is  an  analysis  of  11  of  the  most  populated  of  these  countries,  with  a  combined  population  size  of  3.7bln.  Of  those,  the lack of identity information remains a huge problem in African countries, around  the  Indian  subcontinent  and  Brazil.  China,  however,  has  already  introduced  a  nationwide initiative to provide all people with proper national identification.      Figure 1: percentage of population below poverty line (details on request)        4 
  •     Furthermore,  most  developing  countries  typically  lack  banking  or  other  financial  networks  to  support  the  flow  of  money  across  the  country.  The  lack  of  such  networks also means that the more traditional routes to identification information  are not available.    Hence, in these developing countries, there are a number of issues  ‐ Lack of ID systems   ‐ Lack of Associated Financial information  ‐ Lack of Typical Routes to Credit information e.g. financial institutions    These issues create the following vicious cycle  ‐ Inability  to  adhere  to  minimum  identification  requirements  required  to  use  financial services  ‐ Lack  of  financial  networks  to  roll‐out  financial  services  as  unable  to  verify  customer suitability  ‐ Less money flowing through the economy   ‐ Remain below the poverty line    I. The benefits     Resuming  the  existing  guidelines  in  developing  countries,  as  confidence  increases,  the options in services available to customers may be increased.     The challenges are how to build up the basis for the identity confidence score & how  to measure it.  Overcoming this challenge can increases the spread of and demand  for financial and consumer services in a lot of the emerging markets resulting in an  increase of the mass of money and its velocity.    II. Target market sizing – mobile phone penetration in developing  countries     Mobile  subscribers  have  recently  exceeded  4.1bln  people  worldwide  (UN  report,  March  2009).  This  makes  the  mobile  phone  one  of  the  essential  items  for  people,  alongside  their  personal  wallet  and  keys.  The  average  penetration  rate  of  mobile  phones  in  the  selected  developing  countries  stands  at  48%.  Growth  rates  are  still  impressive, with South Africa and Brazil representing the leading markets.     Cross‐referencing the mobile penetration rate with people living below poverty line  in these markets, it would be possible to provide 431M additional people with a  form of verifiable identity through the mobile phone.  5 
  •   Mobile phone users living below poverty line (est., in mil) in selected  developing countries (n=431mil) China 11 6 India 20 23 100 Nigeria Brazil 24 Pakistan 25 Indonesia Philippines South Africa 34 Bangladesh Vietnam 88 50 Kenya 50   Figure 2 mobile phone users living below poverty line in selected developing countries (details on request)    Additionally  there  are  large  funds  being  remitted  into  Asia  and  Africa.  The  World  Bank estimates these inflows into Asia to represent only 50% of the actual. 90% of  these  recepients  are  unbanked  and  therefore  once  again  without  a  centralized  Profile.    Figure 3 Main Flows (2007) larger than 2006 bn USD   Asia Opportunity  India China Pakistan  Indonesia Formal Receiving (US$ bn) 2007  27 25.7 6.1 6.0  Sending (US$ bn) 2006 1.580 3.025 2 1.359  Source: Development Prospects Group at World Bank  6 
  •   III. Solution & Concept     The  key  to  any  identity  solution  utilizing  the  mobile  penetration  is  to  establish  a  method and scoring system required to undertake the following steps  a. Capture the identity of an individual  b. Authenticate the data and identity  c. Continuous interaction and updating  d. Score the identity (identify confidence score)  e. Establish a Profile Exchange  The  creation  and  management  of  the  associated  identity  databases  and  identity  confidence scoring system will provide customers of financial, telecommunications  and  other  sectors  with  the  required  identification/verification  and/or  credibility  check.    a. Capture the identity of an individual     The key to this step is to establish a relationship with a credential provider. The  single largest credential providing identity information in emerging markets would  be, due to its high penetration, the mobile phone number issued by mobile  operators. While a lot of users in these markets are tied to “prepaid mobile phone”  numbers these are still uniquely tied to an individual.     While it is common to share a single phone within a family, each person typically  owns a proprietary SIM card. Creditworthiness, expendable income, usage patterns  etc. can be tracked based on the information available. It is the single largest  common denominator.     The identity information captured by a financial institution typically includes  general information such as;‐   ‐ first & last names,   ‐ home & work addresses  ‐ duration at addresses   ‐ phone number  ‐ type of identification  ‐ valuable additional information (i.e. banking, utilities, mobile phone)   ‐ customer’s transaction history e.g. the number, frequencies & amount  of each transaction,   ‐ Relationship duration (mobile device, bank agreement) etc.  7 
  •   In emerging markets a start can be made on a few of the items;‐  ‐ names,   ‐ addresses  ‐ type of identification    However, in rural areas many people are unable to provide even this on a credible  basis.  In  these  cases,  the  mobile  number  must  serve  as  the  primary  unique  identification  number  with  which  additional  information  will  be  associated  (similarly to a social security no, passport no, etc).     In  a  typical  financial  agreement  a  customer  is  first  required  to  provide  proper  identification e.g. identify themselves as the owner of an account from which funds  are being withdrawn.     Contacts at physical locations generate a report, based on the data gathered during  the transaction. This report is transmitted to the identity verification & confidence‐ scoring database via a network interface or mobile phone. Such identity information  would be collected and used to create the customer’s identity profile.     Diagram 1  Various initiatives are already underway to encourage Mobile operators to open up  identity related API’s to access the necessary initial information and subsequently in  an on‐going continuous information‐gathering processes.  8 
  •     If the customer is using a mobile phone (or PDA) to complete a remote transaction,  the customer`s phone number, account number and any other personal information  associated with the phone account can be captured and added to their profile.     The SIM card could be used to record when & what identification has been checked  to the customer or an automatic number identification system could be integrated.     Further, a mobile phone`s camera (or other recording apparatus) could be used to  add  multimedia  content  to  the  profile  (i.e.  picture,  audio,  video).  Additionally,  if  a  customer  initiates  a  web‐based  or  mobile  interaction  (e.g.  financial  transactions  through  web/PDA,  mobile  (mobile  wallet)),  the  customer`s  IP  address,  internet  provider,  web  profile  account  information, etc  can  be  collected  &  submitted  in  the  same way. Information from Kiosks, Agents etc could also be used for this purpose.    b. Authentication of data & identity  Verification of identity is required to initiate money transfers, bill payments, apply  for  a  loan,  financial  services,  a  government‐issued  ID  or  passport,  employment  verification,  etc.  A  customer’s  identity  may  be  verified  at  a  customer  service  (or  agent) location.     This  can  be  done  with  the  mobile  phone  number  by  providing  the  number  to  the  representative  of  the  bank,  insurance,  etc.  This  person  can  then  send  an  SMS  to  a  server system, requesting verification & additional information about the inquiring  person.     Based on this request, the server sends an SMS to the customer, requesting them to  reply with their PIN to proof their identity and confirmation of the intended action.     The central server checks the provided PIN with the PIN entered when activated the  number and sends an informational SMS to the vendor (either verification or non‐ verification  of  identity),  if  available,  with  additional  information/an  identity  confidence score.  9 
  •     Diagram 2  Such verification process may also include checking the customer’s ID, mobile phone  bill, a government ID card, etc if and where such sources are available.    A  positive  identity  transaction  includes  a  successful  ID  check  or  non‐fraudulent  transaction.  Such  transactions  and  verifications  may  be  performed  through  any  channel  (e.g.  via  a  mobile  device,  on  the  internet,  over  the  phone,  in  person,  etc.).  Therefore, the identity verification process must include a connection to channel the  data to a host computer configured to authenticate the identity prior to processing  the transactions for an account.    In order to avoid fraud by using a different number to fake an identity, a personal  digital signature must be attached to the number (e.g. a picture, physical signature,  etc or other IDs). The easiest form is a personal identification number (PIN) which  the  consumer  is  requested  to  enter,  remember  (and  re‐enter  as  identity  confirmations at verification points) upon activating their number.    c. Continuous interaction & updating   Information associated with a mobile number is constantly being updated through  additional  and  recurring  interactions  between  the  customer  and  the  physical  and  remote locations (i.e. mobile top ups, bank visits, online money transfer, etc).     To  enrich  identity  profiles  in  order  to  analyze  patterns  and  habits  to  provide  the  most  accurate  picture  of  creditworthiness  updates  on  the  profiles  are  undertaken  regularly in a manner similar to that of the initial identity capture and verification.  Furthermore,  additional  “deeper”  information  can  be  gathered  and  added  in  the  same way, e.g.  multimedia, alternate IDs, etc.       10 
  •   Additional  "physical  locations"  may  include  a  mobile  phone  providers’  and  other  utilities office locations,  government office, convenience stores, shopping center or  any  other  location  where  the  customer  presents  identification  and  engages  in  financial transactions, in‐line transactions or point‐of‐sale (POS) device transactions  (local channels) or at other utility/service providers (e.g. gas company or insurance  provider).     Contacts at physical locations generate a report, based on the data gathered during  the transaction. This report is transmitted to the identity verification & confidence  scoring database via a network interface or mobile phone. Such identity information  would be collected and used to create the customer`s identity profile.     Essentially  any  usable  identity  information  source  (e.g.  type  of  action,  (ID  card),  amount  &  type  of  payment,  recipient  etc)  can  be  utilized  in  order  to  generate  a  fuller, more accurate profile for each identity.     All additional information contributes to further analysis and influences the identity  confidence score.    d. Scoring the identity   All  identity  information  can  be  stored  in  a  database  and  used  for  verification  processes, calculations & analyses to generate a confidence identity scores.    The  confidence  scoring  system  is  intended  to  serve  as  a  measurement  for  businesses & institutions to assess whether a particular individual is credible or  not, based upon their:  i. personal profile  ii. history of transactions  iii. transaction purposes and recipients  iv. amounts and frequencies    Essentially any usable identity information source (e.g. type of action, (ID card),  amount & type of payment, recipient etc) can be utilized in order to generate a  fuller, more accurate profile for each identity.     An  algorithm  and  point‐based  system  is  being  developed  which  represents  the  identity`s confidence score. On activating an identity/mobile number, the newly  created identity is awarded a certain amount of points. Based on the nature, size,  impact,  frequency,  method  and  purpose  of  ensuing  transactions,  points  are  added  or  subtracted.  A  positive/negative  identity  transaction  is  therewith  directly causing an increase/decrease of the identity score which is aligned by its  impact  (e.g.  12  months  monthly  money  transfer  (+++)  >  one‐time  shop  (+)  >  canceling standing order (‐‐)).   11 
  •   The generation of the identity confidence scores further comprises weighting the  identification  information  (e.g.  government  ID  >  university  pass  >  mobile  number)  which  proportionally  affects  the  amount  of  points  allocated  per  transaction.     Each  type  of  physical  and/or  remote  location  affects  the  identity  confidence  score  at  a  varying  rate,  too.  The  score  is  then  scaled  and  unified  in  order  to  provide “relativity”. Points will be measured against a benchmark and presented  as a confidence percentage.     Once the required data is gathered, the identity confidence score is continuously  updated,  based  on  any  additional  identity  information  available,  including  a  successful,  unsuccessful  and  even  no  attempt  in  verification.  Each  piece  of  identity  information  and  each  transaction  will  derive  a  more  accurate  identity  confidence score.    e. Profile exchange    The  ability  to  build  a  database  of  meaningful  transaction  information  and  the   creation of an enhanced customer database & scoring system is only beneficial if  it  provides  the  underpinning  for  a  variety  of  other  institutions  to  build  off.  Ideally  the  core  system  should  be  accessible  through  a  federated  model  and  integrated into other businesses and/or systems.     Using  open  standards  and  common  used  industry  protocols  would  simplify  the  integration  and  exchange  of  authorized  profile  information.  Software  could  easily  be  converted  using  these  open  standards  and  protocols  with  various  proprietary.     Figure 3 The Open Stack for Internet Identity. These standard interfaces make the web more open, social, and  interconnected.    12 
  •   A  third‐party  mobile  network  operator  (MNO)  could  utilize  the  customer  confidence  and  verification  data  to  verify  customer  identities.    New  customers  might  be  directed  to  an  agent  location  for  a  third  party  entity  to  gather  information and, based on the stored information about the customer, a report to  the  MNO  could  be  generated  indicating  whether  or  not  the  new  customer`s  identity  could  be  (re‐)verified.  In  essence,  this  third  party  entity  becomes  an  identity confidence broker to MNOs, by using the established infrastructure and  collected data to provide a level of confidence.  13 
  •   The Plan     In  order  to  assess  the  best  markets  to  target  and  create  and  execute  a  detailed  business plan the following items IV and V need to be examined in more detail;    IV. The System     The solution can be developed based on market requirements using a variety of  different software‐, application‐ and hardware‐standards and technologies.     Utilizing  open  and  industry  standards  in  a  federated  manner  will  simplify  the  exchange  of  identity  profiles  &  histories.  Defining  the  API's  and  the  level  of  access  and  services  could  easily  automate  the  management,  use  &  exchange  of  data.    The customer account may be activated on a provisional or limited basis in order  to allow for the gathering of additional identity information as well as allowing  for a history with the customer to be developed. The account may have various  restrictions placed on it, based on the limited identity information collected.    The method of establishing a general system which provides information about  the  customer`s  credibility  and  trustworthiness  compromises  of  the  above  mentioned  steps  of  gathering  &  constantly  updating  identity  information  and  based  on  that  generating  the  identity  confidence  score  associated  with  each  identity`s profile.    An identity confidence system & the available identity data enable people in  developing countries to make use of a larger pool of services (e.g. taking a loan)  in a more advanced environment (e.g. legal contract), thereby opening up new  opportunities & facilitating the financial development of those currently below  the poverty line.    V. Business model     Establishing a partnership with mobile operators would be the primary focus to  establish identity records. In countries like Nigeria, South Africa and India there  are  currently  strong  initiatives  amongst  mobile  operators  working  to  open  up  APIs  and  enable  the  exchange  of  information  in  order  to  collect  &  access  data.  These  markets  have  a  high  mobile  penetration  while  at  the  same  time  there  is  relatively high percentage of the population without a form of identity.   14 
  •   Working with the various governmental institutions and industry Associations to  align behind the initiative will further enhance the go to market and partnership  links.  Further informing vendors, financial institutions, governments and NGO’s of the  identity verification service will lead to further partnership which would provide  additional exchange of information.  A  service  fee  would  be  charged  to  access  the  database  &  identity  confidence  scoring  system.  Customers  would  include  financial  institutions  &  interested  parties  such  as  MFI’s  for  microloans,  banks,  insurances.  The  confidence  index  and  score  would  provide  these  parties  with  a  credible  third‐party  recommendation along with access to additional consumer data and support the  market & businesses in their expansion.        15 
  •               T +852 2167 8311    @exicon    www.exicon.mobi  16