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Hoshin Presentation Example June 7 2010

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  • 1. Facilitation - Instructor - Consultant John Petak Exercise Lean LLC Hoshin - F119 • 09/08 to 09/10 2009 “If you are doing today what you did yesterday, prepare to do nothing tomorrow”. “People don’t care how much you know, until they know how much you care”. 1
  • 2. 20 PRINCIPLES OF LEAN 1. Identify the value stream 2. Go See “Go to Gemba” – Direct Observation 3. Develop an eye for improvement “Learn to See” 4. Identify the waste (MUDA) 8 Types (the most difficult part) MUDA 5. Make things visual 6. Speak with data 7. Get flow (material, information and $$$) 8. Do things in REAL TIME and @ POINT OF USE @ the customer TAKT 9. Question everything … Why? Why? Why? … 10. Focus on the things that your customer is willing to pay for (The right things) 11. Do the right things right the first time (Quality First) 12. Create a culture of Continuous Improvement (Kaizen) focused on making many small changes for the good of the people who do the work 13. Familiarity is the enemy of continuous improvement 14. Walk the processes/value streams Sta nd rds a e ncy Tra nspar 15. Focus on the WHAT not the WHO WHO 16. Develop a culture of effective problem solvers T e im 17. Stabilize ►Standardize ►Squeeze through PDCA cycle 18. Gemba is a mirror of the way the area is managed 19. PROFIT = PRICE – COST 20. Adopt (become) lean by creating a culture of lean thinkers WHO WHO 3 Presentation Planning 1 Hoshin Definition - Kaizen - Takt Time 2 Work content - Cycle Time Diagram 3 Number of operators - Parts Board Objective 4 Elimination of waste 5 Standardized Work and balancing 6 One-piece flow 7 Layout 8 6 Quality Basics 9 Ergonomics 10 Frontal loading 2
  • 3. Hoshin Definition - 1 Kaizen - Takt Time 1.1. 1.1. Hoshin Definition “HO” = Method Way of setting “SHIN” = shiny needle / compass directions Find simple and immediately applicable solutions in order to: Improve quality Resize the line to make it more adaptable to customer demand Reduce variability Improve the flow Eliminates wastes 6 3
  • 4. 1.1. Hoshin Definition How : Observations and measurements of shop-floor malfunctions. HOSHIN is shop-floor action. This action starts off with a rapid change and then continues indefinitely. 7 1.2. Kaizen HOSHIN is never finished and goes with a KAIZEN state of mind (progress one small step at a time). Productivity Innovation + Kaizen Innovation Time 8 4
  • 5. 1.2. Kaizen 10 steps to a Kaizen state of mind: 1 Challenge fixed ideas, challenge existing methods 2 Instead of saying things cannot be done, think of ways it can be 3 Implement good ideas without delay 4 Do not wait for perfection, better 60% improvement now 5 Correct errors as they happen, with the team 6 From difficulties, generate new ideas 7 Apply the “5 Why” and find the root cause 8 Use ideas from 10 people, not just from one expert 9 Try out ideas and confirm their effect 10 Improvement is infinite 9 1.3. 1.3. Takt Time It represents, in units of time, the number of parts the customer expects us to deliver. * Production Time / day TAKT TIME = + Number of parts required / day * Production time = open time - programmed stops + Or customer demand. 10 5
  • 6. 1.3. Takt Time Pull flow vs. Push flow PUSH PULL 11 Work Content - 2 Cycle Time Diagram 6
  • 7. 2.1. Work Content It is the sum of basic tasks performed at each workstation to obtain a complete and good product. JOB 1 JOB 2 JOB 3 Finished part Minimum cycle times found in time study : 30s 50s 40s Work Content = 30s + 50s + 40s = 120s 13 2.2. Cycle Time Diagram It brings out variations between each cycle (variability) and the imbalance among the operators. Time Time (in s) (in s) 45 45 TAKT TIME TAKT TIME 40 40 35 35 30 30 25 25 20 20 15 15 10 10 5 5 0 0 OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 OP5 OP1 OP2 OP3 OP4 OP5 14 7
  • 8. 2.2. Cycle Time Diagram 15 Cycle Time Measurement Form 16 8
  • 9. Standardized Work Chart 17 Standardized Work Combination Table 18 9
  • 10. Number of Operators - 3 Parts Board Objective 3. Number of operators & Parts Board Objective With Takt Time and Work Content, we have: NUMBER OF Work Content = OPERATORS Takt Time Parts Board objective: new ones to determine before starting with new layout. 20 10
  • 11. Elimination 4 of Waste 4. Elimination Of Waste Overproduction Overprocessing Motion Scrap & Rework Waiting Storage Inventory Unused Human Capacity 22 11
  • 12. Big Muda T ransportation I nventory M otion W aiting O verproduction O verprocessing D efects / Rework / Scraps Wanted DEAD or ALIVE: Tim Wood Brainless Father of 7 Waste Shigeo Shingo Mr. Shingo distinguished himself as one of the world's leading experts in improving manufacturing processes. He has been described as an "engineering genius" who assisted in the creation of, and wrote about, many of the features of the revolutionary just-in-time manufacturing methods, systems, and processes which make up the renowned Toyota Production System and related production systems. The Shingo Prize is named for the Japanese industrial engineer, Shigeo Shingo. His greatness was in his ability to understand exactly why products are manufactured the way they are, and then transform that understanding into a workable system for low-cost, high-quality production. Mr. Shingo died peacefully November 14, 1990 at the age of 81. 12
  • 13. Shigeo Shingo Father of Just in Time 13
  • 14. Taiichi Ohno Kaoru Ishikawa Ishikawa diagrams were proposed by Kaoru Ishikawa[1] in the 1960s, who pioneered quality management processes in the Kawasaki shipyards, and in the process became one of the founding fathers of modern management. It was first used in the 1960s, and is considered one of the seven basic tools of quality management, along with the histogram, Pareto chart, check sheet, control chart, flowchart, and scatter diagram. It is known as a fishbone diagram because of its shape, similar to the side view of 14
  • 15. Kaoru Ishikawa Kaoru Ishikawa 15
  • 16. Standardized Work 5 and Balancing 5. Standardized Work and Balancing Balancing Precisely defined and repetitive process. Definition of: Best way to do basic tasks Best succession of basic tasks TRANSFORMATION, INSPECTION and MOVEMENTS from & to the workstation. 32 16
  • 17. 5. Standardized Work and Balancing Process Technician’s responsibility : Train the operators on the line. Ensure quality and productivity. Defining standardized work implies that we have first eliminated or reduced waste, which is a source of variability. Balancing workstations is a requirement. 33 One Piece 6 Flow 17
  • 18. 6. One Piece Flow Maximal elimination of waste implies working with zero intermediary stock between operators. Every operator must pass on a good part to the operator at the next workstation. 35 6. One Piece Flow BEFORE 36" 720" 36" 180" 36" total 1008" 20 parts 5 parts AFTER 36" 36" 36" total 108" 36 18
  • 19. 7 Lay-out 7. Layout Raw materials B Stock Stock Finished product A C Stock Raw materials Stock Raw materials A B C Finished products 38 19
  • 20. 7. Layout U Line Advantages Disadvantages - Mutual assistance possible - Risk of mix-up - Easier communication - Maintenance more - More balancing solutions (max. difficult flexibility) - People blocked - Obliges use of small containers - Passageway needed all - Fosters polyvalence around - Greater reactivity to quality problems - More difficult to - Physical zone for the team coordinate upstream - Less moving around and downstream - More layout alternatives - Return of empty tooling - Better control of WIP if operator (conveyor pallets) handles both first and last operation - Easier supply / withdrawal of finished product containers 39 7. Layout Straight Line Advantages Disadvantages - Easier supplying - Communication more difficult - Clearer flow (entry-exit - Longer route (return empty) separation) - Longer line - Easier to mechanize - Fewer layout alternatives - More suitable for bulky - Limited balancing and flexibility products - More movement with long - Easier to integrate into plant machines flow - Poorer reactivity to quality - Easier to understand flow problems - Return of empty tooling (conveyor pallets) 40 20
  • 21. 6 Quality 8 Basics 8. 6 Quality Basics 6 Quality Basics 1 Quality Wall 2 Self Inspection 3 OK First Part 4 Rework Under Control 5 Poka Yoke 6 Red Bins 42 21
  • 22. 9 Ergonomics 9. Ergonomics Minimization of movement and handling Minimization of loads handled (small boxes, around 15 lb) Improvement of work posture Parts easier to pick No obstacles on floor (around or between work stations) Good lighting Noise control and reduction 44 22
  • 23. Frontal 10 Loading 10. Frontal Loading Frontal To reduce the amount of movement needed to pick parts, we must load them frontally and place them in small containers. If there are several references, they must be stored facing the operator as much as possible. This can lead to a reduction in box size. The idea is to “disconnect” the line’s changeover from parts replenishment. Likewise, we must try to disconnect the line’s work form removal of empty boxes and finished product containers. 46 23
  • 24. 1.1. 1.1. Hoshin Definition HOSHIN means seeking simple and immediately applicable solutions in the workplace, with all the people concerned, to eliminate waste and improve flow. It is a serious reexamination of the production line organization aiming to: improve quality by mastering processes (particularly human processes) resize the line to make it more adaptable to customer demand reduce variability 47 Spaghetti Diagram/Value Stream Mapping 1 3 13 2, 5, 7, 9, 12, 15, 17 14 10 11 4 16 6,8 24
  • 25. Six Primary Barriers to Change 1. Justification 2. Not invented here 3. Done that before 4. Don’t rock the boat 5. It’s not my job 6. “It may work in other industries, but Lean won’t work here in this environment” Diagnosis of Current State (1) Product Value Stream Levels (PVS) • All divisions • All plants within a division • Individual plant • Process level Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 50 25
  • 26. Diagnosis of Current State (2) Product Value Stream (PVS) Focus Create the “Current State” • PVS from beginning to end (Customer to Supplier) • Focus on product families • Visually check - go to gemba • Hand draw map using M&I symbols • Collect actual data - no Engineering or BOM data allowed Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 51 Diagnosis of Current State - Purpose • Enable people to see the flow of material and information through a facility through its Product Value Stream (PVS) • Identify sources of muda (waste) and other opportunities to improve • Plan actions that have quick and significant impact • Provide the improvement committee with a common language • Link principles and concepts of KAIZEN and lean principles of Toyota Production System Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 52 26
  • 27. Focus of Material and Information Flow • Baseline methodology and symbols for defining material and information flow before and after KAIZEN activity. • Used to support the principles and concepts of KAIZEN and the principles and technologies of the Toyota Production System. • Leadership clarity & responsibility – Transform current state to lean – Design new processes for lean Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 53 Material and Information Flow Process • Define project scope (which Product Value Stream). • Establish work teams. • Gather data. • Create a “current state” Material and Information Flow Chart. • Identify KAIZEN opportunities. • Create a “vision state” Material and Information Flow Chart. • Create a “roadmap” on how to move from current to vision state. • Implement the KAIZEN activity. • Document results using the KAIZEN Story format. Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 54 27
  • 28. Data Gathering Tools • Interviews with key personnel – Production / Inventory Control – Engineering / Maintenance – Production – Quality • Walking through the Product Value Stream • Material and Information Flow Chart blank form • Data collection sheets • Inventory sheets 6/9/2010 Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 55 Simple “Push” Flow Chart Example Production Control Weekly/Monthly Forecast Weekly Orders Daily Orders (small percent) /Deliveries (fax/verbal) Daily Material Work Orders Weekly Forecast (fax) Release Schedule Final QC 2 Assembly 4 Inspection Supplier Warehouse 1 Injection 3 Warehouse Customer Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 56 28
  • 29. Simple "Push" vs. "Pull" Flow Chart Examples Production D A E Control Weekly Orders Push System /Deliveries Daily Orders/ Daily Schedule Daily Schedule Weekly Forecast Injection #1 2 5 Supplier Warehouse 1 Assembly 4 Assembly Customer Injection #2 3 Weekly Orders/Deliveries E Production E Control Pull System Daily Orders/ Weekly Forecast KB Injection #1 KB Supplier Warehouse Assembly Staging Customer KB Injection #2 KB Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 57 Material and Information Flow Symbols Pull Common Material Flow Pull Inter-factory Transportation Parts Withdrawal Kanban Factory Transportation Production Instruction Kanban Manual Information Flow Signal Instruction K Kanban Process B Stores Data Block Push (computer Kanban Post information) One Piece Flow Problem/KAIZEN 1 Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC Opportunity 58 6/9/2010 29
  • 30. Information Flow Symbols (1) E External Mail E E-mail I Internal Mail P Phone Call Meeting F Fax Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 59 Information Flow Symbols (2) D I Waiting for Information Printing D A Waiting for Authorization Copying Information Filing Retrieval Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 60 30
  • 31. Material Flow Data Material Flow Data for PVS • Shifts worked • Number of people by location or process • In-process inventory by P/N & location • Machine Condition – Cycle Time C/T – Changeover Time C/T – Up-time – First Time Quality % Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 61 Information Flow Data - Customer Customer Information for PVS • Shifts worked • Forecast method 90/60/30 day • Daily order method • Delivery frequency • Container type – Returnable – Disposable Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 62 31
  • 32. Information Flow Data - Scheduling Production Scheduling • Shifts worked • Scheduling method – Month / week / day – Revisions – Daily order method • Delivery frequency • Container type – Returnable – Disposable Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 63 Information Flow Data - Suppliers Supplier Order • Shifts worked • Order method – Month / week / day – Revisions – Daily order method • Delivery frequency • Container type – Returnable – Disposable 6/9/2010 Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 64 32
  • 33. Processing Station Data M/C time C/O time Uptime % Seconds/day Every product every % First Time Quality Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 65 Push vs. Pull Production Operation 1 Operation 2 Stock at Point of Manufacture Operation 1 Operation 2 PULL SYSTEM Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 66 33
  • 34. Push Flow Chart with Lead Time Calculations Production E Control Weekly/Monthly Forecast (small percent) F Daily Orders (fax/verbal) I Work Orders Weekly Forecast (fax) F Final QC 2 Assembly 4 Inspection Supplier Warehouse Assembly 3 Final QC Final QC 1 Inspection Inspection 12 days 1 day 2 days 2 hours 4 days c/t = 90 seconds c/t = 5 min. 32 sec. c/t = 60 min. c/o = 16 minutes c/o = 3 min. c/o = 60 sec. Upt = 80% Upt = 98% Upt = 95% 27,000 seconds/day 27,000 seconds/day 27,000 seconds/day EPE = week EPE = week EPE = week Def. Rate = 2.1% Def. Rate = 1.8% Def. Rate = 3.2% Total 12 days 1 day 2 days 2 hours 4 days 19 days 2 hours 90 Seconds 332 Seconds 3600 Seconds 4022 Seconds 67 minutes Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 67 Data Collection Sheet for Material and Information Flow Process Name Date Completed Completed By Before KAIZEN After KAIZEN Improvement Comments Customer Requirements Monthly Weekly Daily Hourly Process Layout (AS IS) Floor Space Calculation for Each Area Spaghetti Chart (Including Distance Walked) Inventory (Use Inventory Sheet If Necessary) Finished Goods by Location Finished Goods Space Calculation Raw Materials by Location Raw Materials Space Calculation Part Number Usage (BOM) Package Type -Returnable or Disposable Package Dimensions Package Quantity Scheduling Method / Frequency Customer Order Supplier Order Production Delivery Method of Raw Materials & Components Supplier to Plant Stores Plant Stores to Production Process Plant to Customer Transportation Method Within Plant Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 68 34
  • 35. Inventory Sheet for Material and Information Flow Process Name Date Completed Completed By Finished Goods Pkg. Pkg. Part # Description Lot Size Location Amount Type Dimensions Comments Raw Materials/Components Pkg. Pkg. Part # Description Lot Size Location Amount Type Dimensions Comments Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 69 Material and Information Flow - WIP Process Name Date Completed Completed By Work in Progress and Sub-assemblies Pkg. Pkg. Part # Description Lot Size Location Amount Type Dimensions Comments Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 6/9/2010 70 35
  • 36. Instructions • Go to the production area assigned • Deploy data gathering to team members – Processing station data – Inventory data – Customer requirements data – Process layout sketch and data – Scheduling methods – Delivery methods • Identify the 10 most critical raw materials or components ($) • Walk through the core process asking questions • Return to meeting room to create Material and Information Flow Chart. • Spaghetti Chart for current state of line assigned. Prepared by John F Petak Exercise Lean LLC 71 36