Results of the SPE Survey on Attraction and Retention of Employees

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The SPE Talent Council’s survey on factors impacting retention received responses from 1737 people. The link to the survey was primarily distributed through social media and kept open from late January to early July 2013. Participants were asked about 31 reasons for leaving and 31 reasons for staying with an employer. “Opportunity” was the “most important” reason that people stayed with an employer and “lack of opportunity” was the “most important” reason for leaving. However, “opportunity”, while still the biggest driver, was diminished in relative importance for both women and men over the age of 40.
Although “opportunity” clearly gathered the largest number of “most important” responses, “opportunity” only accounts for 10 to 12% of the “most important” responses for leaving and 7 to 8% of the responses for staying. To capture 50% of the “most important” responses as to why people left, 7 to 8 factors were needed, and to get to 80%, 15 to about 16 factors were needed. Similarly, with regard to staying, 9 to 11 factors were needed to capture 50% and 17 to 20 to capture 80%. When all women are compared with all men, the two groups agree on the same top five reasons for leaving and share nine of the top ten reasons for staying. However, when we split both genders by age into over and under the age of 40, more differences emerge.
A much higher percentage of women than men cite “conflict with supervisor,” “conflict with co-workers,” and “unsatisfactory working conditions” as reasons for leaving. Women also are far more likely than men to leave to follow a relocated partner and to cite work-life balance issues including “inflexible work schedules”, “too much time away from family”, and “pressure not to use work/life benefits” as “most important” reasons for leaving.
Women indicate “respect” much more often than men when it comes to picking “most important” factors for staying with an employer. For women under age 40, “flexible work schedules” are about as strong as “respect” in enhancing retention.
In their responses to the survey, men consistently place a greater emphasis than women on “pay”. This may be a reason why throughout their careers men tend to earn more than women. Women place a higher importance on other factors. Women are believed to be less likely than men to negotiate pay. The survey results showing the lower priority that women place on money suggests that as a group, women may be less motivated than men to negotiate about money than about other factors of higher priority to them.
Of the 1737 survey respondents, 80 people reported that they had left the petroleum industry. The most frequently cited “most important” reason was “to move to a location I like better.” The second most often selected reason was “retirement”. The strongest incentives for both young mothers and retirees to return to the petroleum industry workforce are “access to part time work”, a “chance to make a difference”, and “ability t

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Results of the SPE Survey on Attraction and Retention of Employees

  1. 1. SPE Paper 168112 Attraction and Retention of Employees Results of 2013 SPE Talent Council Survey Eve Sprunt,* Susan Howes, and Michael Pyrcz Chevron *independent consultant as of 10/31/2103
  2. 2. • “Opportunity” or “insufficient opportunity” • Are the most important drivers, but relative importance of opportunity declines with age • Although “opportunity” is the most important driver, it accounts for only about 10 to 12% of “most important” responses for why people leave and 7 to 8 % for why they stay • 15 to 16 factors are needed to capture 80% of the “most important responses and those factors vary between groups • “Conflict with supervisor” • Far higher percentage of women cite “conflict with boss” and “conflict with co-workers” as “most important” reasons for leaving. • A higher percentage of men under age 40 in dual career couples cite “conflict with boss” than men under age 40 who are not part of a dual career couple Key Findings Slide 2 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz
  3. 3. Key Findings Slide 3 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz • Men consistently place a greater emphasis than women on financial compensation • A higher percentage of women than men consider “respect” to be a “most important” reason for staying with their employer • For women under age 40, “flexible work schedules” are almost as important as “respect” in enhancing retention • The strongest incentives for both retirees and young mothers to return to the petroleum industry workforce are: • “A chance to make a difference” • “Access to part time work” • “Ability to telecommute
  4. 4. SPE Talent Council Surveys SPE Talent Council has conducted three surveys: • May 2011 of entire SPE membership with 5570 responses, SPE Paper #160928 • December 2011 of SPE members under age 45 with 1392 responses, SPE Paper #151971 • January through July 2013 social media survey on factors impacting retention with 1737 responses, SPE Paper #168112 Slide 4 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz
  5. 5. Comparison of 2013 Survey with Prior Surveys Slide 5 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz Survey Distribution Total Women Men No Gender # % # % # % 2013 Retention Survey social media 1737 422 24% 875 50% 440 25% Dec 2011 SPE under age 45 emailed 1392 428 31% 947 68% 17 1% May 2011 SPE members emailed 5570 774 14% 4078 73% 718 13% For surveys distributed by social media need to be more persuasive in getting people to divulge age and gender.
  6. 6. Comparison of Demographics Between Emailed 2011 Survey and Social Media 2013 Survey Slide 6 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz Very similar age distribution for women in both surveys The demographic bulge of men who started work in the 1970’s and early 1980’s has shifted.
  7. 7. Workforce of the Future -- Dual Career Couples Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz Slide 7 • Women until their partners retire tend to be part of a dual career couple • Except for men under age 25, who are most often single, long term trend for a higher percentage of men to be part of a dual career couple • Indications are that in the future the majority of the workforce will be part of a dual career couple.
  8. 8. Demographic Groups Studied Slide 8 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz Total # Dual Career % Dual Career Women >40 186 99 53% Men >40 554 122 22% Women <40 227 148 65% Men <40 289 119 41% • all men with all women • men <40 with women <40 • men >40 with women >40 • men <40 with men >40 • women <40 with women >40 • Men <40: dual career vs other men
  9. 9. Retention Slide 9 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz 1 employer % 1 employer More than 1 employer Total Women 105 26% 302 407 Men 152 37% 255 407 Women <40 77 35% 143 220 Men <40 87 31% 197 284 Women >40 28 15% 158 186 Men >40 65 12% 489 554
  10. 10. Multitude of Motivating Factors Slide 10 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz Reasons for leaving •Top factor captures 10% to 12% of “most important” responses. •50% of responses takes 7 or 8 factors •80% of responses takes 15 to 16 factors Reasons for staying •Top factor captures 7%to 8% of “most important” responses. •50% of responses takes 9 to 11 factors •80% of responses takes 17 to 20 factors Different groups don’t agree on top factors.
  11. 11. Opportunity Slide 11 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz Opportunity or Insufficient Opportunity are the biggest drivers for people to join or leave an employer For older people, Opportunity is still the most important factor, but not by as big a margin
  12. 12. Why People Leave Slide 12 Paper # • Paper Title • Presenter Name
  13. 13. Gender Difference in Why People Leave Slide 13 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz • Agreement on top five reasons • Insufficient opportunity • Develop new competencies • Leadership/direction of company • Better fit to core competencies • For better pay • Agree on 9 of top 10 reasons • Women rank “pressure not to use work/life benefits” as 10th and men as 15th • Agree on 13 of top 15 reasons • Men rank “to be self-employed” 13th and women rank it 30th • Agree on 17 of top 20 reasons • Not adjusting for “not applicable” responses, women rank “follow relocated partner” as 16th and men as 27th .
  14. 14. Different Ways of Making Comparisons Slide 14 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz • We compared different groups in both by how they ranked the factors and by the difference in the percentage labeling a factor “most important.” • “Conflict with boss” was a big percentage difference, but a small ranking difference • “Follow relocated partner” was significantly different both ways
  15. 15. Intensity of Driving Forces Slide 15 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz • People cited more reasons as being “more important” for staying than for leaving. • Older men label identify fewer factors as being “most important” • People were much more likely to say something was “not applicable” with regard to leaving than for staying.
  16. 16. Gender Differences in Reasons for Leaving Slide 16 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz • Women are more likely to leave because of conflict with their boss and to follow their partner • Men are more likely to leave to be self employed
  17. 17. Gender Differences in Why People Stay Slide 17 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz •Women are more likely to stay because they are respected and have a flexible work schedule •Men are more motivated by money
  18. 18. Age Differences for Leaving Slide 18 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz
  19. 19. Working for Same Employer Slide 19 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz Advantages •Coordinate relocation •Ease in picking home location •Easier childcare •Coordinate travel •Coordinate daily schedule Disadvantages •Employer requires that one career leads and the other follows •Benefits reduced •Employer coordinates careers as a couple •Job security December 2011 survey Whose career takes precedence? •Women more likely to be asked •Women with children are about 2x as likely to be asked as men with children •People working for the same employer as their partner
  20. 20. Men <40: Dual Career vs Other Men Slide 20 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz • Dual career men are more likely to leave because of working too many hours or a conflict with their boss • Other men are more likely to leave for better pay and benefits. • Surprisingly, other men are more likely to leave because of an inflexible work schedule.
  21. 21. Why People Left Petroleum Industry Slide 21 Paper # • Paper Title • Presenter Name • Top 3 reasons for women: • For more interesting work • Insufficient opportunity • To live in a location I like better • Top 3 reasons for men: • To live in a location I like better • Retirement • Terminated and couldn’t get another job
  22. 22. Incentives to Return to Work Slide 22 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz Top 3 Reasons •Chance to make a difference •Part time work •Telecommuting Retirees Mothers
  23. 23. Why Joined Petroleum Industry Slide 23 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz Top 3 reasons •Opportunity •Degree best qualifies •Good pay But men value “good pay” more than women
  24. 24. Conclusions Slide 24 • Attraction and retention programs and policies that were optimized for the male, single breadwinner workforce will not be as effective for the emerging mixed gender, dual career couple workforce. • People differ. Money is not a panacea. Attracting and retaining employees is complex and attention must be given to multiple factors • Top incentives to get people to return to the work force are not high priority for those currently in the workforce • Many women appear to still be facing a relatively hostile work environment in which they are more likely to have a conflict with their supervisor and co-workers. • Age, gender and domestic partner work status all impact the relative strength of attraction and retention factors. Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz
  25. 25. For Further Study Slide 25 Paper #168112 • Attraction and Retention of Employees • Sprunt, Howes, & Pyrcz • Why are women and dual career couple men more likely to leave because of conflict with their supervisor? • Are women less likely to negotiate pay than other terms of employment?
  26. 26. Acknowledgements / Thank You / Questions Paper # • Paper Title • Presenter Name Slide 26
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