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Human-Centered Design and the Intersection of the Physical and Digital Worlds
 

Human-Centered Design and the Intersection of the Physical and Digital Worlds

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EffectiveUI user experience designers Lindsay Moore and Austin Brown's Lightning Round presentation given at IxDA Interaction '11 in Boulder, CO. "Austin and Lindsay demonstrate how they've redesigned ...

EffectiveUI user experience designers Lindsay Moore and Austin Brown's Lightning Round presentation given at IxDA Interaction '11 in Boulder, CO. "Austin and Lindsay demonstrate how they've redesigned everyday objects based on the combined disciplines of industrial and digital interaction design."

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  • \n
  • A: Hey, I’m Austin Brown\nL: and I’m Lindsay Moore\nA: and we’re both user experience designers at EffectiveUI.\nL: So, my background is actually in the fine arts — painting and sculpture — but after making a go as a gallery artist when I first got out of school, I realized that solving creative problems for myself was pretty boring, and that it was much more interesting to solve problems for other people. I have been working as an interaction designer ever since, with a focus in mobile, information design, and user research.\nA: Lego\nRecombining \nunaware of fine art - absorbed in my own world - unaware of other people’s existence\nfound i could Get Paid for systems, devil’s advocate, etc- College - ID\nIxD - Analog\nBackground in “things”\n\nL: Even though we share a title, share few day-to-day tasks\nI grew up as kind of a Lego kid. Not aware of art - ignorant of other people, and totally content doing things for myself...Taking things apart, recombining them into new concepts. i spend my formative years blissfully unaware of other people’s existence... - thankfully i grew out of it. I didn’t realize i could get paid to think about systems and problems until I went to school and majored in Industrial Design. I’m now an interaction designer, but I still try to take an analog approach to my design.\n\n
  • L: Today we want to talk a little bit about human-centered design and the intersection of the physical and digital worlds. \nL: There’s an inherent danger in always talking about design thinking with people who already share your same viewpoint and background, and I feel very lucky to have had the chance to explore this topic with someone like Austin who doesn’t always agree with my perspective.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • (EUI Specific!) Anecdote\nInterface work for a kiosk \nexpecting they’ll go to someone else for physical part and third party for environment\non top of that - brand agency handing over corporate style guide and business a list of functional req’s. \nbrand hands over style guides, and biz hands over functional requirements\nnot encouraged or allowed to talk.\nneedless to say - not the right approach to user-centered design\n\nA: We’ve got an anecdote that we think might ring true for some of you in the audience. At EffectiveUI, we’ll have a client who comes to us for interface design work for a kiosk they’re developing. In this kind of situation, they’re usually assuming that someone else will design the actual physical part and a third company might figure out what environment the kiosk lives in. And then on top of that you’ve got a brand agency handing over a corporate style guide, and a list of functional requirements and none of the groups are really encouraged or even allowed to talk to one another. We don’t think this is the right approach to user-centered design.\n
  • L: Our clients really perceive industrial design and interface design as being two separate (DISPARATE?) disciplines. In their eyes, industrial designers (RIGHT!!) are concerned with making physical objects and digital designers (LEFT!!) are concerned with making websites and applications for screens.\n\nThe way our industry is set up really supports this misconception. From design school curriculums into the first part of our careers, we are asked to pick a direction and a title, to define ourselves as a visual designer, or an information architect, or an industrial designer.\n
  • Truth is that all these disciplines are IxD - \n\n[L: unless you happen to not have users ;) ]\n\nClients’ view of our craft needs to change\nmore opportunities to Cross Pollinate\nNext Gen ground breaking products \n\nA: The truth is that all of these disciplines can technically be called interaction design, and have much more in common than you might initially think.\nWe really believe that the way our clients view our craft needs to change, so that we can have more opportunities to cross-pollinate between disciplines and come up with the next generation of products as ground-breaking \n\nL: And for this to happen, the industry at large needs to change as well, we need to rewrite the stories we tell about what we do and how we do it.\n
  • A: Step back\nHistory of IxD\nInterface designers have learned a lot\nTechniques and practices from ID counterparts\n\nA: Let’s take a step back and look at the history of interaction design. Interface designers have learned a lot of interaction design concepts from their industrial design counterparts.\n
  • L: It’s not a new concept to talk about a human-centered approach to design, and if you look back through history you will see plenty of industrial designers and architects who were talking about the same kinds of things we tout now. \nGetting down to specifics, we want to talk a little bit about a few user-centered design principles that originated with industrial design.\n
  • A: The first is affordance.\n
  • Front door\nKnow how to interact -- form communicates. \nA: This is the front door to the EffectiveUI building in Denevr. You know how to interact with this door because its form communicates what to do (push to open, or pull from the other side).\n\nL: In his book The Design of Everyday Things, Don Norman talks about affordance and the need to provide an appropriate conceptual model for how something works, without instructions. The PHYSICAL form is all the instruction a user should need.\n
  • L: Of course, we’re all used to those little bits and pieces of UI that use affordance to communicate when something is a switch, a button, or is sortable, or resizable, or draggable.\n
  • A: Less need for “buttons”\nWin Mobile 7\nflat interface \nMore of page is actionable\n\n\nA: It’s interesting to note that the need for affordance in our designs has started to change. We don’t need those dimensional button cues because we know how buttons work - they no longer need to reference real-world affordances. Windows 7 is a great example, where everything is much more flat and more and more of the page is becoming actionable.\n
  • L: Another principle that originated with industrial design is the importance of providing feedback about the state or status of a system.\n
  • A: talk about photo\nPOSITION\nwhen we talk about status -> conventions -> learned ways of knowing state \n\nA: In this photo, you know that the door is locked, but not chained, and that the lights are on because of the position of the locks and switches. When we talk about status, we start to talk about conventions, or learned ways of knowing what state something is in.\n
  • L: Digital interfaces create all kinds of opportunities for communicating status. This interface contains all kinds of cues: files that are uploading, files that are waiting to upload, and details about individual files along with rates of speed.\n
  • L: Digital interfaces create all kinds of opportunities for communicating status. This interface contains all kinds of cues: files that are uploading, files that are waiting to upload, and details about individual files along with rates of speed.\n
  • L: Digital interfaces create all kinds of opportunities for communicating status. This interface contains all kinds of cues: files that are uploading, files that are waiting to upload, and details about individual files along with rates of speed.\n
  • L: Digital interfaces create all kinds of opportunities for communicating status. This interface contains all kinds of cues: files that are uploading, files that are waiting to upload, and details about individual files along with rates of speed.\n
  • L: Digital interfaces create all kinds of opportunities for communicating status. This interface contains all kinds of cues: files that are uploading, files that are waiting to upload, and details about individual files along with rates of speed.\n
  • Constraints to prevent errors before they can occur\n\nA: The last principle we want to talk about that comes from industrial design is the notion of using constraints to prevent errors before they occur.\n
  • A: Insert key\nturn it\nrelease the hand brake\ndepress the clutch and engage the gear\n\nSeries of checks to make sure errors don’t happen\n\nA: This picture is a great illustration of that concept — the baby is not in danger of driving away in the car because she would have to be able to turn the key/ press in the clutch. The system is designed in such a way that a dangerous situation can’t occur.\n
  • L: And as a good UX designer will tell you, “there’s no such thing as user error”\n\nHere we’ve got a Flickr date search, where you don’t need to know how to format the date because you can just pick one from the widget.\nThis form takes into account what data the user will be entering in the fields and provides the http:// for the website field.\nSearch engines have become smarter and more error proof with predictive search, which is great for those of us who can’t spell or type.\n\n\n
  • L: Switching gears a little bit, let’s talk some more about where we think the industry is headed in 2011.\n
  • A: Familiar with Moments when ID has failed at Ixd\ninvolve screens, systems behind the scenes, etc.\nscreen/interface designed by someone more familiar with system than user’s understanding of that system.\n\n(explain that this is a Toto toilet - tell about being in Japan)\n\nI’ve never been scared to use a toilet before I encountered one of these. My previous concept of a toilet was a “one-function” kind of deal...I consider it an inalienable right to know how to use a toilet.\n\nA: We are all familiar with those moments where industrial design has failed at interaction design, and those moments often involve products or objects with screens. It becomes a problem when a product has a digital interface but that interface was designed by an engineer or product designer who understands the system more clearly than the user’s needs \n
  • L: Still, we have finally started to enter that promised era where computing is ubiquitous, and digital interactions are a much larger portion of our daily lives. \n\n\n
  • L: These interactions *are* becoming more useful, usable, and desirable, with a more elegant handling of the combination of object and screen.\n\nA: But we’ve got a question for you all, let’s get a show of hands.\nHow many of you work on digital interfaces for applications, or the web, or mobile devices?\n[raise of hands]\nHow many of you have worked on digital interfaces for other kinds of physical objects or devices?\n[raise of hands]\nHow many of you work within cross-functional teams between industrial/product design and interaction design within your organizations, truly embodying a plurality of POV to solve problems?\n[raise of hands]\nSee, that’s the problem right there, we’re missing an opportunity.\n
  • L: We think that because industrial and digital interface designers aren’t working in a cross-functional way often enough, they are still falling short on some of the principles that have become a standard part of interface design for computers and mobile devices. We’re seeing more and more of a blurring between the physical and digital worlds, and we need to start listening to that as a call-to-action for our industry.\n\nA:Not just ID. Service and Digital? Branding and IxD?\n It’s not just limited to industrial design though... Don’t you think there’s often a disconnect between service design folks and the digital folks, or the branding agency and the digital agency?\n\nL: Totally, and let’s get back to that. But first let’s talk about a few of those principles that are current in digital interface design.\n
  • A: The first is adaptive display.\n\n
  • A: \nLearns user habits and \nchanges to support most common tasks.\n\ntell the story of the ATM\n\n\n• Adaptive display\n• Learns your behavior\n• Displays smart choices\n\nWhen I use the ATM, I am almost always depositing a check or withdrawing 60 or 80 dollars. Notice the 3 quick option buttons on the left have been tailored to my PERSONAL usage patterns. I can get in and out with my money quickly. If I need to do something else, the menu allows for that too. \n
  • L: the next principle is gaming and social media\n
  • L: \nGaming in its most basic definition is:\n--a structured experience\n--has rules & goals\n--fun\n\nGames, especially those with a social media aspect, are incredibly good at manipulating behavior. They change over time in response to the player and reward or reinforce your continued participation. We are starting to see more and more gaming mechanics in everyday applications, and foursquare is a great example.\n\n\n
  • A: And finally we’ll look at information visualization\n
  • A: In his book Beautiful Visualization, Noah Ilinsky says that beautiful information visualization “offers a fresh look at the data or a format that gives readers a spark of excitement and results in a new level of understanding.”\n\nSpark. \nThat’s what we’re looking for. \nData is data. \nInformation is digestible...\n\nLike gaming and social media, information visualization can be a powerful motivator of behavior.\n\n\n
  • 2 objects\nOK - NOT great - not enjoyable\nCould be better\nby employing these principles, leveraged against the flexibility of digital design\nWORKED IN CROSS FUNCTIONAL WAY to explore a better, more compelling experience\nMore compelling\n\nA: So let’s take a look at 3 everyday objects that we use in our own lives.\nThe reality is that each of these products are *okay* but they are never really enjoyable. \nAnd by employing some of the principles we just looked at, leveraged against the flexibilities of digital design, they could become much more compelling to use.\n
  • L: We started by trying to take these digital design principles we’ve just been discussing and overlaying them onto a dishwasher and a thermostat. \n\nWe spanned the gamut between a simple redesign, where we simply added a better screen & interface to a product that already had one, and a more complex device ecosystem where we redesigned both the thermostat and the network of possibility associated with it.\n
  • A: Dishwasher\nLens:Adaptive Interface\nInformation Visualization\n\nLet’s start with the dishwasher. We wanted to look at the dishwasher through the lens of adaptive display & data visualization.\n
  • L: Again, going back to what Austin was saying, it’s a device that currently functions okay but the experience isn’t that great. I know how to set my own dishwasher, I might struggle with the one at work or at my friends’, but I’m fairly smart and I can usually figure it out eventually. And before you start saying “hey, I don’t need my experience with my dishwasher to be great”, consider some questions:\n\nCan you easily tell when the load is clean or dirty?\nDo you know what system changes you’re enacting when you set it to wash on normal, heavy, or pots & pans?\nDo you know what the difference is between these settings, from the perspective of energy and water use?\n\nMost people don’t know what they don’t know, so they probably haven’t ever stopped to consider that their dishwasher experience kindof sucks and could be a lot better.\n\n
  • A: Example relevant boulder\nJoseph\nGREEN\nWonders if the new range of green appliances could save him the trouble of doing dishes. Doesn’t want to sacrifice the environment for the ease of use, but is open to considering it.\n\nA: We’ll use an example that is fairly relevant around Boulder. Joseph is the kind of guy who has lived for years without a dishwasher but is coming around to the idea that it is more energy efficient to use one than to wash dishes in the sink. Still, he’d like to make sure that he’s not using more water or energy than he needs to with this new appliance.\n
  • L: While Joseph is running his dishwasher, he’d like to be able to see where he is in the cycle and how much water and power he has been using. Here he can also quickly delete the drying portion of the cycle if he thinks it’s not needed. And he can see whether the load will be finished before he has to bike over to campus.\n
  • L:While Joseph is running his dishwasher, he’d like to be able to tap the screen to see where he is in the cycle and how much water and power he has been using. \n\nHere he can also quickly delete the drying portion of the cycle if he thinks it’s not needed. \n\nAnd he can see whether the load will be finished before he has to bike over to campus.\n
  • L:While Joseph is running his dishwasher, he’d like to be able to tap the screen to see where he is in the cycle and how much water and power he has been using. \n\nHere he can also quickly delete the drying portion of the cycle if he thinks it’s not needed. \n\nAnd he can see whether the load will be finished before he has to bike over to campus.\n
  • L:While Joseph is running his dishwasher, he’d like to be able to tap the screen to see where he is in the cycle and how much water and power he has been using. \n\nHere he can also quickly delete the drying portion of the cycle if he thinks it’s not needed. \n\nAnd he can see whether the load will be finished before he has to bike over to campus.\n
  • L:While Joseph is running his dishwasher, he’d like to be able to tap the screen to see where he is in the cycle and how much water and power he has been using. \n\nHere he can also quickly delete the drying portion of the cycle if he thinks it’s not needed. \n\nAnd he can see whether the load will be finished before he has to bike over to campus.\n
  • L:While Joseph is running his dishwasher, he’d like to be able to tap the screen to see where he is in the cycle and how much water and power he has been using. \n\nHere he can also quickly delete the drying portion of the cycle if he thinks it’s not needed. \n\nAnd he can see whether the load will be finished before he has to bike over to campus.\n
  • A: Like ATM\nWasher learns most common settings\nIf need to customize...Thanksgiving...\n\nHe taps Build a Custom Program,\n\nA: Like with the ATM, over time, the dishwasher will learn Joseph’s most-used settings. And If he needs to customize a program for an unusually heavy load, he can do so very quickly and easily -- he taps Build a Custom Program, swipes his finger over the matrix of settings, and hits start.\n
  • A: Like ATM\nWasher learns most common settings\nIf need to customize...Thanksgiving...\n\nHe taps Build a Custom Program,\n\nA: Like with the ATM, over time, the dishwasher will learn Joseph’s most-used settings. And If he needs to customize a program for an unusually heavy load, he can do so very quickly and easily -- he taps Build a Custom Program, swipes his finger over the matrix of settings, and hits start.\n
  • A: He taps Build a Custom Program, swipes his finger over the matrix of settings, and hits start.\n
  • A: He taps Build a Custom Program, swipes his finger over the matrix of settings, and hits start.\n
  • A: He taps Build a Custom Program, swipes his finger over the matrix of settings, and hits start.\n
  • A: He taps Build a Custom Program, swipes his finger over the matrix of settings, and hits start.\n
  • A: He taps Build a Custom Program, swipes his finger over the matrix of settings, and hits start.\n
  • A: He taps Build a Custom Program, swipes his finger over the matrix of settings, and hits start.\n
  • L: With the dishwasher, we really had three takeaways.\n\nThe first is that information is interesting. It’s hard to care about the energy use of your appliances when you can’t see it.\n\nNext, is the importance of aligning with the user’s mental model. Settings are presented in a matrix corresponding to the user’s idea of more (hotter, more scrubby, more dry) and less (cooler, less power, no dry).\n\nFinally, by using an adaptive display, we were able to create a system that is efficient for many repeat uses but also learnable and customizable.\n
  • L: With the dishwasher, we really had three takeaways.\n\nThe first is that information is interesting. It’s hard to care about the energy use of your appliances when you can’t see it.\n\nNext, is the importance of aligning with the user’s mental model. Settings are presented in a matrix corresponding to the user’s idea of more (hotter, more scrubby, more dry) and less (cooler, less power, no dry).\n\nFinally, by using an adaptive display, we were able to create a system that is efficient for many repeat uses but also learnable and customizable.\n
  • L: With the dishwasher, we really had three takeaways.\n\nThe first is that information is interesting. It’s hard to care about the energy use of your appliances when you can’t see it.\n\nNext, is the importance of aligning with the user’s mental model. Settings are presented in a matrix corresponding to the user’s idea of more (hotter, more scrubby, more dry) and less (cooler, less power, no dry).\n\nFinally, by using an adaptive display, we were able to create a system that is efficient for many repeat uses but also learnable and customizable.\n
  • A: thermostat (not just thermostat - whole heating/cooling system)\n\nlens:\nINFORMATION VISUALIZATION\nSOCIAL MEDIA\n
  • L: The thermostat really is one of those problematic devices in our houses. You don’t have to set it up very often, so you can’t remember how to do it whenever the seasons change. There’s little or no feedback about how efficient your schedule is, so it is hard to make intelligent adjustments, and you’re more than likely just going to override your scheduled program when you’re too hot or cold.\n\nAlso, often, what is in our houses is actually really old technology and it is stuck on the wall of your living room. We’re starting to see wi-fi enabled thermostats that can communicate to an app on your smartphone, but the interfaces still leave a lot to be desired.\n
  • Joneses\n30 something couple from MN\nhave toddler\nrenovated and want to use smart home tech to be environmentally conscious\n\nA: Here we’ve got a family, a 30-something couple from Minneapolis with a toddler. They’ve recently renovated their home and are trying to install smart home technology to help them be more environmentally conscious.\n
  • L: One of the things we really identified with a family like the Joneses is that since they are early-adopters with technology, they are going to be more open to the idea that a thermostat doesn’t need to just be device on your wall. If everything is networked, the controls for a thermostat can live on your wall, but also on your phone or tablet computer.\n
  • A: \nCARRIE\nAdjusting for Cold Snap\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • A: here she can see a bit of information\nTEMP\nSystem Status\nOutside Temp\nForecast\nEven a message about wind-chill advisory tonight from energy co-op\n\nHere, she can see a bit of information about the temperature in the house and the system status \nas well as the current outside temperature and forecast.\nThere’s even a message from her energy co-op about a wind-chill advisory for the night.\n\n
  • L: Because it is a touchscreen device, and because the setup is controlled on a chart instead of having to page through different settings, Carrie has a better idea of how what she is changing relates to the overall setup.\n\nHere she can also see the dotted line for estimated rate of change and can see that the system doesn’t really go on for long enough in the morning to get the house warm during the time they need it to be warm.\n
  • A: \nChecking email - message from gas and electric co. inviting participate in energy challenge\n\nlogs into website and sees she can monitor energy usage and earn rewards.\nLater, on her laptop, Carrie is checking her email and sees a message from her gas and electric company inviting her to participate in an energy challenge.\n\nShe logs in to their website. Here, she realizes that she can monitor and track her energy usage and earn rewards.\n
  • The next morning she’s meeting a neighbor for coffee and they start talking about the program. Turns out her friend is participating, too.\n\nLater that week, she gets another message telling her she received a “Sweater Queen” badge for keeping her thermostat 2 degrees lower during the day. She thinks this is funny and posts it to Facebook for her friend.\n
  • L: The next day the cold snap hits and Mike and Carrie are watching TV while it snows outside.\nCarrie is cold, and she tells Mike she wants to turn up the heat. \n\n\n
  • A: MIKE Recently downloaded companion app for smart thermostat - can adjust heat from couch.\nNotification-neighborhood-point-bill incentive.  Badge for leaving thermostat low on cold evening\n\nApparently Mike has downloaded the companion app for his smart thermostat, and can turn up the heat right from on the couch! \nWhen he loads the app, he sees a notification telling him that his neighborhood has almost earned enough points for an incentive on their next bill, and he’ll get a new badge for not turning up the heat on this cold evening. \n\n\n
  • A: Decides to get carrie a blanket instead of adjusting thermostat\n
  • L: Carrie’s annoyed but secretly she wants the badge, too, and proudly posts it to Facebook the next day.\n\n
  • L: With the thermostat, we had a few takeaways as well.\n\nFirst was to reconcile the mental model with the system model. We used the dotted line on the chart to help explain to a user that the system actually doesn’t heat up instantaneously.\n\nNext, was the importance of making information actionable. When information leads a user to understanding, it can help affect changes in behavior. But there is also a more immediate concept of being actionable as well. Rather than requiring a complex setup across multiple screens, you could create a thermostat schedule by directly manipulating the chart on the screen.\n\nFinally, the power of positive reinforcement along with community competition is a key factor in social gaming. Positive reinforcement provides personal incentive, but community competition can be an incentive unto itself, when you have to measure yourself by or be accountable to a community.\n
  • L: With the thermostat, we had a few takeaways as well.\n\nFirst was to reconcile the mental model with the system model. We used the dotted line on the chart to help explain to a user that the system actually doesn’t heat up instantaneously.\n\nNext, was the importance of making information actionable. When information leads a user to understanding, it can help affect changes in behavior. But there is also a more immediate concept of being actionable as well. Rather than requiring a complex setup across multiple screens, you could create a thermostat schedule by directly manipulating the chart on the screen.\n\nFinally, the power of positive reinforcement along with community competition is a key factor in social gaming. Positive reinforcement provides personal incentive, but community competition can be an incentive unto itself, when you have to measure yourself by or be accountable to a community.\n
  • L: With the thermostat, we had a few takeaways as well.\n\nFirst was to reconcile the mental model with the system model. We used the dotted line on the chart to help explain to a user that the system actually doesn’t heat up instantaneously.\n\nNext, was the importance of making information actionable. When information leads a user to understanding, it can help affect changes in behavior. But there is also a more immediate concept of being actionable as well. Rather than requiring a complex setup across multiple screens, you could create a thermostat schedule by directly manipulating the chart on the screen.\n\nFinally, the power of positive reinforcement along with community competition is a key factor in social gaming. Positive reinforcement provides personal incentive, but community competition can be an incentive unto itself, when you have to measure yourself by or be accountable to a community.\n
  • A: Now that you’ve had a chance to see the way we approached an interaction design problem in the physical space, let’s review some of the principles of design thinking that we’ve touched on throughout this talk.\n\nAlign with users’ mental models\nProvide appropriate feedback\nEliminate chance for error\n\nLearn & adapt the interface to user behavior\nMotivate with game and social mechanics\nLet information spark understanding & delight\n
  • A: Now that you’ve had a chance to see the way we approached an interaction design problem in the physical space, let’s review some of the principles of design thinking that we’ve touched on throughout this talk.\n\nAlign with users’ mental models\nProvide appropriate feedback\nEliminate chance for error\n\nLearn & adapt the interface to user behavior\nMotivate with game and social mechanics\nLet information spark understanding & delight\n
  • A: Now that you’ve had a chance to see the way we approached an interaction design problem in the physical space, let’s review some of the principles of design thinking that we’ve touched on throughout this talk.\n\nAlign with users’ mental models\nProvide appropriate feedback\nEliminate chance for error\n\nLearn & adapt the interface to user behavior\nMotivate with game and social mechanics\nLet information spark understanding & delight\n
  • A: Now that you’ve had a chance to see the way we approached an interaction design problem in the physical space, let’s review some of the principles of design thinking that we’ve touched on throughout this talk.\n\nAlign with users’ mental models\nProvide appropriate feedback\nEliminate chance for error\n\nLearn & adapt the interface to user behavior\nMotivate with game and social mechanics\nLet information spark understanding & delight\n
  • A: Now that you’ve had a chance to see the way we approached an interaction design problem in the physical space, let’s review some of the principles of design thinking that we’ve touched on throughout this talk.\n\nAlign with users’ mental models\nProvide appropriate feedback\nEliminate chance for error\n\nLearn & adapt the interface to user behavior\nMotivate with game and social mechanics\nLet information spark understanding & delight\n
  • A: Now that you’ve had a chance to see the way we approached an interaction design problem in the physical space, let’s review some of the principles of design thinking that we’ve touched on throughout this talk.\n\nAlign with users’ mental models\nProvide appropriate feedback\nEliminate chance for error\n\nLearn & adapt the interface to user behavior\nMotivate with game and social mechanics\nLet information spark understanding & delight\n
  • L: We feel like the first three principles have a mature expression across design disciplines today.\n
  • L: The other three, however, are currently siloed in practice. We’re seeing rich expression of these in digital interfaces but the design of physical products isn’t keeping pace. \n\nAnd discussions about these principles is even siloed within the digital space. For example, information design has become its own discipline, as if it can be abstracted from all of the other factors that make up solving problems for users.\n\nWe need a better marriage of our old standby design thinking with the newer principles we’re uncovering every day, and we need to make sure we are applying them in a broad sense across the work we do.\n
  • A: 60 Fuzzy Labels do no good us/clients\n\nClients think we provide web/product/branding work\nthey’re right.  \nBut should they be?\nKiosk - ground up product, interface, service all in account.\n\nCar- healthy channel of comm. btw among teams designing dashboards, brand experience, and web app.  \n\nWhy can’t product designer and a game designer help imagine healthcare solutions for disadvantaged\n\nWe bring specific skills to the table as designers, but broad experience, problem solving, and understanding help determine how those skills are best utilized in designs. \n\nWe have a narrow set of honed skills but a broad understanding of how they can be put to use.\n\nThe fuzzily-defined labels we use for ourselves do us no good and they do our clients no good.\n\nOur clients think that we provide web design, or product design, or branding work exclusively. From the stories we tell, they’re right! But should they be? Going back to the kiosk, why shouldn’t it be designed from the ground up with product, interface, and service design all taken into account? Why shouldn’t a car manufacturer facilitate a healthy channel of communication between the people designing their dashboards, their brand experience, and their web app? Why can’t a product designer and a game designer help imagine healthcare solutions for disadvantaged communities? \n\nWe each bring specific skills to the table as designers, but more importantly our broad experience, problem-solving, and understanding help us determine how those skills are best utilized in designs. narrow skills, broad application.\n
  • L: In order to better accommodate the breadth of what design thinking can represent, especially in a world where the distinction between physical and digital is evaporating, we should reframe what we do and what we call ourselves.\n\nWe’re all interaction designers.\n\n
  • Thanks! If you’d like to discuss this with us later, we’ll be at our table out front all afternoon.\n\n
  • each industry has its place\nthey shouldn’t be siloed\nneed more collaboration\nA + B = more than its parts\n-one of the things at EUI is designing for people\n-what is the problem you’re solving for\nTHE WHY\nsolve for people, or trying to show that 2 seemingly disparate practices share multiple synergies\n\nask how many are ID, how many are IxD, how many work in cross-functional teams within your organizations\n\nthe industry at large needs to change\nthe way clients view our craft needs to change\npoint to service design as well\n\nLook at concept of T-Shaped designer\n inherent danger in talking to people who always share the same viewpoint as i do\n\nas interaction designers we are able to think much more broadly about the world\nbut\n\nare you currently working in the field in which you were formally trained?\nat EUI we have strong interaction designers, but from a variety of backgrounds...\n\nfrom an agency perspective, retelling the story of what we do, so that it’s not a story of “we make web applications”\n\nBetter collaboration between industries\nBe more clear about the work we’re seeing\nWhat is the call to action for people in the audience\nMake suggestion to think about these principles\noffer a summary at the end -- bullet point the principles\nthey are a common ground\nmarriage of two -- bringing forward as a vernacular for internal teams & clients\n\nmake the thermostat and dishwasher feel equal in weight & time spent\nstill feels a little mechanical/rehearsed\nembody plurality of POV\nhave some moments where we disagree\nneed for a voice in the community to come forward & integrate these things\n\nCRAFT LAsT SLIDE NEXT\n\nFord, embedded user interface design, wanted to see that we had been deisgning for automobiles for a while.\nFor example, When a client comes to us and wants to develop a kiosk, assume that someone else will design the actual physical part. what environment the kiosk lives in, what the physical object.\ntake a stand\nshow titles from a bunch of different agencies, ask “hey does this person do ____”\nas a field, what if we say “we’re all interaction designers”\nwe’re not “web designers”\n\ndisconnect internally between interaction & industrial design, disconnect between the world at large and the tasks & skills that we bring to bear\nindustry needs to mature, conversation around it, exposure\nexpand the notion of what it means to be an interaction designer\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n

Human-Centered Design and the Intersection of the Physical and Digital Worlds Human-Centered Design and the Intersection of the Physical and Digital Worlds Presentation Transcript

  • Re-imagining the Design of Everyday ThingsHuman-centered design and the intersection of the physical and digital worlds
  • Hi! Austin Lindsay Brown Moore UX UX Designer Designer EffectiveUI Twittering our session? Use the hashtag© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc. #effectiveui
  • Human-centered design and the intersection of the physical &© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • “We’re making a product”© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • “We’re making a product”© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • “We’re making a product”© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • “We’re making a product”© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • “We’re making a product”© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • “We’re making a product”© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • “We’re making a product”© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Industrial Digital© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Industrial X Digital© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Recognizing the need is the “ primary condition for design. –Charles Eames© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Means must be subsidiary to “ ends and to our desire for dignity and value. –Mies van der Rohe© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Affordance© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • Providing feedback about the state of a© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/meganbarton/3023756556/© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • Constraints to prevent errors before© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/telstar/2751796683/© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • Ubiquitous computing© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • Physic Digita© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Adaptive Display© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • Gaming/Social Media© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • Information Visualization© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • The redesign of everyday© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • The Dishwasher Adaptive Display Information Visualization© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • ‘Joseph’ has lived without a dishwasher for 25 years, but is coming around to the • Teaches at the University of Colorado • Lives as greenly as possible • Wants to make informed decisions about having technology in his life rather than mindlessly consuming© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • Takeaways:© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Takeaways: Information is interesting© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Takeaways: Information is interesting Align with mental model© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Takeaways: Information is interesting Align with mental model Efficiency can meet learnability/ customization© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • The Thermostat Information Visualization Gaming/Social Media© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • The ‘Joneses’ have been trying to install smart home technology to help • Carrie is a stay-at-home mom, aspiring blogger, and Facebook Mike, Carrie, & Spencer addict • Mike is an electrical engineer and self-described gadgethead© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
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  • Takeaways:© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Takeaways: Reconcile mental & system models© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Takeaways: Reconcile mental & system models Make information actionable© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Takeaways: Reconcile mental & system models Make information actionable Positive reinforcement + community competition© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Six Principles of Design Thinking:© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Six Principles of Design Thinking: Align with users’ mental models© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Six Principles of Design Thinking: Align with users’ mental models Provide appropriate feedback© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Six Principles of Design Thinking: Align with users’ mental models Provide appropriate feedback Eliminate the opportunity for error© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Six Principles of Design Thinking: Align with users’ mental models Provide appropriate feedback Eliminate the opportunity for error Learn & adapt the interface to user behavior© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Six Principles of Design Thinking: Align with users’ mental models Provide appropriate feedback Eliminate the opportunity for error Learn & adapt the interface to user behavior Motivate with game and social© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • } Align with users’ mental MATURE models EXPRESSION ACROS Provide appropriate feedback DESIGN DISCIPLINE Eliminate the opportunity for error© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Align with users’ mental models Provide appropriate feedback SILOED IN PRACTICE: Eliminate the opportunity for error RICH EXPRESSION IN DIGITAL BUT Learn & adapt the interface to user behavior }© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Web Design Application Design UX Design Game Product Design Mobile Design Design Service Interface Design Industrial Design Design Visual Design Branding© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • We’re all Web Design Application Design UX Design Product Design Interaction Mobile Design Game Design DesignersService Interface Design Industrial Design Design Visual Design Branding© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.
  • Thanks!© 2011 EffectiveUI, Inc.