Quality improvement healthcare final

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  • Batalden, P., & Davidoff. F. (2007). What is ¨Quality Improvement¨ And how can it transform healthcare? Qual saf and Health Care, 16, 2-3. doi:10.1136/qshc.2006.022046
  • Another model of qualityimprovement that can be applied to health care is the six sigma method. The term “six sigma” basically means 3.4 errors per million. Reference: Duke University Medical Centre. (2005). Department of Community & Family Medicine. Patient Safety- Quality Improvement. Retrieved from http://patientsafetyed.duhs.duke.edu/module_a/module_overview.html
  • Image retrieved from http://worldbestonlinepharmacy.com/?wm=17750&tr=8030
  • Bandyopadhyay, J., &Coppens., K. (2005). Six Sigma Approach to Healthcare Quality and Productivity Management. International Journal of Quality & Productivity Management. 5, 1-13 . Retrieved from http://condor.cmich.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p1610-01coll1/id/3349/rec/13,
  • Kosnik, L. K., Espinosa, J.A. (2003). Microsystems in Health Care:Part 7. The Microsystem as a Platform for Merging Strategic Planning and Operations. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Safety. . Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 452-459. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://clinicalmicrosystem.org/materials/publications/JQIPart7.pdf Shakti Gupta and Sunil Kant (1999).Total Quality Management and Accredation: Strategic Essentials for the next Millennium. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://www.jkscience.org/archive/Volume22/Total%20Quality%20Management%20and%20Accreditation.pdf
  • Kosnik, L. K., Espinosa, J.A. (2003). Microsystems in Health Care:Part 7. The Microsystem as a Platform for Merging Strategic Planning and Operations. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Safety. . Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 452-459. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://clinicalmicrosystem.org/materials/publications/JQIPart7.pdf Shakti Gupta and Sunil Kant (1999).Total Quality Management and Accredation: Strategic Essentials for the next Millennium. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://www.jkscience.org/archive/Volume22/Total%20Quality%20Management%20and%20Accreditation.pdf
  • Kosnik, L. K., Espinosa, J.A. (2003). Microsystems in Health Care:Part 7. The Microsystem as a Platform for Merging Strategic Planning and Operations. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Safety. . Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 452-459. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://clinicalmicrosystem.org/materials/publications/JQIPart7.pdf Osmond Vitez (2012). Steps in Total Quality Management. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://www.ehow.com/about_5414945_steps-total-quality-management.html
  • Kosnik, L. K., Espinosa, J.A. (2003). Microsystems in Health Care:Part 7. The Microsystem as a Platform for Merging Strategic Planning and Operations. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Safety. . Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 452-459. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://clinicalmicrosystem.org/materials/publications/JQIPart7.pdf
  • Kosnik, L. K., Espinosa, J.A. (2003). Microsystems in Health Care:Part 7. The Microsystem as a Platform for Merging Strategic Planning and Operations. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Safety. . Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 452-459. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://clinicalmicrosystem.org/materials/publications/JQIPart7.pdf Osmond Vitez (2012). Steps in Total Quality Management. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://www.ehow.com/about_5414945_steps-total-quality-management.html
  • Quality improvement healthcare final

    1. 1. Quality Improvement inHealth Care
    2. 2. Quality Improvement• “The combined and unceasing efforts of everyone- healthcare professionals, patients and their families, researchers, payers, planners and educators- to make the changes that will lead to better patient outcomes(health), better system performance (care) and better professional development(learning)”.
    3. 3. Six Sigma in Healthcare• Name comes from the use in statistics of the Greek Letter (sigma:σ/ς) to denote Standard Deviation from the mean. 6 sigma is equivalent to 3.4 defects or errors per million.• Six Sigma is a measurement-based strategy for process improvement and problem reduction completed through the application of improvement projects. This is accomplished through the use of two Six Sigma models: DMAIC and DMADV.• DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) is an improvement system for existing processes falling below specification and looking for incremental improvement.• DMADV (define, measure, analyze, design, verify) is an improvement system used to develop new processor products at Six Sigma quality levels.
    4. 4. • The Six Sigma process is highly measurement and data driven. Data has to be gathered to determine the baseline performance of a process in order to validate that an improvement has been made. Decisions are made on statistics and facts, rather than instinct or past history.• The challenge for health care industry to benefit from the use of Six Sigma is paramount. Patient care significantly involves human element as compared to machine elements, in which the variability is subtle and very difficult to quantify. Therefore, challenge in adopting Six Sigma approach to healthcare is to find a way to leverage the data from Six Sigma to drive human behavior. Success will come only when the Six Sigma technical strategy is combined with a cultural strategy for change acceleration and a sound operational mechanism.
    5. 5. Total Quality Management• An approach that organizations use to improve their internal processes and increase customer satisfaction.• Is a collection of principles, techniques, processes, and best practices that over time have been proven effective.• It is used interchangeably with Continuous Quality Improvement in many areas.
    6. 6. ObjectivesThe main objectives of TQM are:• Customer Focus• Scientific approach• Continuous improvement• Participation by everyone at all levels
    7. 7. Customer focus• Understanding customer needs by collecting, analyzing and act on customer information. Planning process• Integrating customer knowledge with other information to come up with new processes to meet the desires of customers
    8. 8. Process management• Develop processes that are stable and capable of meeting customer expectations.• Includes reviewing services to ensure they are consistent in quality standards, to ensure products continue to meet customer needs.
    9. 9. Process improvement• Continuous improvement of the process to match the changing customer preferences and demands. Total participation• All divisions and employees commit to a customer focus and desire to produce the best services to meet consumer demands
    10. 10. FADE model of quality improvement Focus Analyse Develop Execute Evaluate
    11. 11. The FADE-model in practiceRapid Response Team-> used FADE in the development of the RRT• Focus: Had been identified before. To implement a RRT in a hospital in Kentuckey• Analyse: Literature review about the topic• Develop: created an implementation plan and probable solution. A list of early rescue signs from ‘Failure to rescue’ was made and nurses were educated about the new RRT pilot• Execute: The goals of the team were presented and the lists distributed among nurses• Evaluate: A survey was conducted
    12. 12. Medical Microsystems TheoryThe microsystem is the logical locus for linkage between vision and delivery and therefore can and should act as the “agent for change” within a macrosystem. The microsystems framework provides practical steps for designing or redesigning microsystems to perform optimally in alignment with the strategic plan.
    13. 13. Effective microsystems have similar optimal characteristics:• leadership, culture, macro-organizational support,• patient focus, staff focus, interdependence of care• team, information and information technology, process• improvement, and performance patterns
    14. 14. Microsystems thinking makes several organizational assumptions:• 1. Bigger systems (macrosystems) are made of smaller systems• 2. These smaller systems (microsystems) produce quality, safety, and cost outcomes at the front line of care• 3. Ultimately the outcomes of the macrosystem can be no better than the microsystems of which it is composed
    15. 15. Collaboration ProcessWe discussed about the outline and topics in our presentation.Afterward we divided the tasks and agreed to meet the next dayto discuss our work and the problems we might haveencountered. We discussed some final amendments and made afinal task division. The next morning we agreed to meet early todiscuss our presentation and to inform each other about ourwork.
    16. 16. Referances• Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke University Medical Center (2005) Patient Safety – Quality Improvement. What is Quality Improvement? Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://patientsafetyed.duhs.duke.edu/module_a/module_overview.html• McFarlan, S.J., Hensley, S. (2007) Implementations and outcome of a rapid response team. Journal of Nurse Care Quality. Vol. 22, No. 4, pp. 307-313• Shakti Gupta and Sunil Kant (1999).Total Quality Management and Accredation: Strategic Essentials for the next Millennium. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://www.jkscience.org/archive/Volume22/Total%20Quality%20Management %20and%20Accreditation.pdf• Osmond Vitez (2012). Steps in Total Quality Management. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://www.ehow.com/about_5414945_steps-total-quality- management.html• Kosnik, L. K., Espinosa, J.A. (2003). Microsystems in Health Care:Part 7. The Microsystem as a Platform for Merging Strategic Planning and Operations. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Safety. . Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 452-459. Retrieved on the 3rd of April 2012 from: http://clinicalmicrosystem.org/materials/publications/JQIPart7.pdf
    17. 17. • Batalden, P., & Davidoff. F. (2007). What is ¨Quality Improvement¨ And how can it transform healthcare? Qual saf and Health Care, 16, 2-3. doi:10.1136/qshc.2006.022046• Reference: Duke University Medical Centre. (2005). Department of Community & Family Medicine. Patient Safety- Quality Improvement. Retrieved from http://patientsafetyed.duhs.duke.edu/module_a/module_overview. html• Image retrieved from http://worldbestonlinepharmacy.com/?wm=17750&tr=8030• Bandyopadhyay, J., & Coppens., K. (2005). Six Sigma Approach to Healthcare Quality and Productivity Management. International Journal of Quality & Productivity Management. 5, 1-13 . Retrieved from http://condor.cmich.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p1610- 01coll1/id/3349/rec/13,
    18. 18. Search Strategy• FADE-model: Search in PubMed and Google Scholar with the following keywords: FADE-model of Quality Improvement, Quality Improvement in Health Care, Deming FADE-model, Deming Quality Improvement, Focus-Analyze- Develop-Execute model• Six sigma-model: Searched using Google Scholar and my university data base search. Used key words like “six-sigma model, quality improvement, six-sigma model in health care”.

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