Transition Capital Fund By Evan Morris

496 views
448 views

Published on

Closely held businesses frequently experience the challenge of transitioning ownership. This document addresses this subject using office furniture dealers as a case study.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
496
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
16
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transition Capital Fund By Evan Morris

  1. 1.      CHOQUETTE + MORRIS    Optimizing Independent Dealer Networks      Ft. Lauderdale • Denver            T RANSITION  C APITAL  F UND  HOLDING COMPANY – MANAGEMENT COMPANY    Office Furniture Dealers    August, 2009    
  2. 2.       CHOQUETTE + MORRIS  Evan Morris  9980 E. Chenango Ave.    Optimizing Independent Dealer Networks  Greenwood Village, CO 80111    303 345 3355    Ft. Lauderdale • Denver  HEvanLMorris@comcast.net        August, 2009    Dear   Prospective Investor     Office Furniture Dealer and     Manufacturer    We are working on a solution to an on‐going challenge within the contract office  furniture dealer community.   There are approximately 1,450 dealers who, for  over 60 years, have brought Grade “A” product to market that is manufactured by  one of six premier companies:  Steelcase, Herman Miller, Haworth, Knoll, Allsteel  and Teknion.     The challenge is the transition of ownership of these dealerships.  It has  become difficult and limited due to a number of constraints that we discuss in the  following pages.    We see a significant opportunity with no competitors at this time.  Our vision  includes creating a Transition Capital Fund (TCF) that will be both a holding  company as well as a management company.  Our funding goal is outlined in a  couple of options on page 20.  There would be several scenarios to fund the  entity, only two are mentioned here.        TCF will facilitate ownership transfer by buying and holding dealerships for  five years or less while a new, qualified buyer prepares to totally step into the  transaction.  The dealership acquisition targets will be businesses that are  profitable, stable, aged and proven operating entities.         We would like to share our vision in more detail if we could meet in person  to present our case.  We welcome your shared enthusiasm in our venture and  look forward to working with you.    Very truly yours,        Evan L. Morris   
  3. 3. Contents        Contact Evan Morris, EvanLMorris@comcast.net to  discuss the entire/total contents of this significantly  abridged version of the document.   
  4. 4.     TRANSITION CAPITAL FUND  HOLDING COMPANY – MANAGEMENT COMPANY      Transition Capital Fund offers an orderly succession plan and exit strategy for contract office furniture  dealership owners.  The company assures a sustainable future for the dealership by providing access  to ownership for qualified buyers and creates a satisfactory return for TCF investors.  The company  also enhances dealership profitability by leveraging management services and providing components  of infrastructure such as financial management, sales leadership and backroom solutions.      “Current economic conditions are creating an environment like none before.  This is not so much a recession but is more  like an economic reset.  In the wake of this change we will see traditional business models reshaped and re‐invented.   Some will be permanently cast aside, others will be tweaked and tuned and yet other distribution models will come into  existence for the first time.  Our paradigms are shifting as we speak.” – Evan Morris, August, 2009      An Opportunity to Solve a Conundrum    One of the most challenging aspects of being an office furniture  dealer today is how the principal owners can transition the business  they have spent so many years building into a successful entity.    • The dealer distribution channel is graying with many owners  reaching a point in their careers where they are looking for  an exit strategy.   • Many of the new potential dealer principals who have experience, capability and the desire to be an  owner do not have the resources necessary to finance the transaction or to be bankable.   • Banks have historically been unwilling to provide funding to enable a leveraged buy out.   • And most importantly, manufacturers have been and continue to be unwilling to provide financial  assistance for an orderly transition of the dealer network.   As a result, many dealers are looking for general mangers so the dealer principal can step aside from active  business management; some smaller dealers are simply selling or merging with larger adjacent dealers thereby  stimulating a local consolidation of sorts which only increases and delays the inevitable exit strategy; or  dealerships are simply closing.  Manufacturers are not inclined to do anything which would change the  parametric of their distribution channel relative to transition.  Instead, the manufacturers are leaving it to the  Choquette + Morris                                                                                                                                                                                                Page | 2   
  5. 5.     dealers to find an exit strategy which in the end is no solution at all and therefore provides the opportunity for  a paradigm shift in the industry.    Further complicating matters, manufacturers reserve the right to transfer their product line to new ownership.    And while this is understandable, the manufacturers have also taken the previously stated position of not  providing any type of financial assistance in the transition of ownership.  New dealer principals typically do not  have the liquidity or credit available to fund such a transaction.  Furthermore, when individuals or  corporations have the funds they may not be acceptable to the manufacturers as they are absentee owners,  publicly held corporations, or angels.   Hence, the conundrum, “How to transfer ownership of the business  while satisfying the needs of all parties?”    Summarizing:  When the current state of the economy is examined, it is difficult to sell the business for the premium  that has been possible for many years  There are other competing investment opportunities  Often, there is an over inflated perception of what the business is worth  A graying population of dealer owners want to retire and get out of the business  Finding a financially capable buyer is illusive      The Contract Office Furniture Industry  The Market ‐ The contract furniture business is a hundred year old industry in the United States which began  with the manufacturing of wood furniture at the turn of the century, expanding into steel furniture in the  1920’s and then into systems furniture in the 1960’s. Today, the industry produces a wide variety of both  mainstream and niche products including desks, chairs, files, furniture systems and wood furniture, as well as  niche products including lighting, desk accessories, school, laboratory, medical and conference furniture. The  industry also produces a wide variety of smaller volume products aimed at both high design and price pointed  markets for chairs, reception and specialty furniture. In recent years, the industry has expanded into fabrics,  raised flooring and the demountable wall markets as it seeks to expand its footprint in tangential products.     The contract furniture industry is estimated to have a market potential of $8.0 billion dollars which is down  from an industry high of $11.4 billion in 2007. This contraction is directly related to the current economic  difficulties which began in December of 2007. BIFMA (Business Institutional Furniture Manufacturers  Association) projects the industry will begin recovery and enjoy a growth rate of 2.8% ‐ 3% in 2010. Not  included in these market potential numbers are the product lines of the laboratory, medical and demountable  wall markets which would account for an additional $2 billion.                                                                                                                                                                                              Page | 3   
  6. 6.     Services directly related to contract office furniture would include delivery, installation, design, asset  management, storage, remanufactured and rental furniture which add an additional $8 billion dollar potential  to the industry.  Total market potential for the industry for contract furniture, additional products and services  is estimated to be at $18+ billion.    Manufacturing ‐ The current market is dominated by six major manufacturers listed in order of market share:   • Steelcase, 23%, (a broad line manufacturer with the largest market share),   • Haworth, 16%, (which mostly competes in the contract furniture market),  • Herman Miller, 14%, (which is primarily in the contract and laboratory furniture markets),   • Knoll, 9%,  (which plays in the high design, high end contract furniture market),   • Allsteel, 6%, (part of the HNI umbrella, contract furniture) and  • Teknion, 4% (contract furniture).   In the mid‐market segment of the overall furniture industry, Hon (HNI) holds about a 13% share.  Closely  following these manufacturers are Kimball (mostly a wood manufacturer with some products in the broader  market) and Global (primarily a mid‐market player with some upper‐end appeal with their Teknion furniture  systems product line).  Imported products are playing an increasing role as manufacturers look offshore to  reduce labor costs.  Much of the furniture imported into the United States comes from Canadian  manufacturers.  There has not been a significant amount of imports from Europe.  Asian countries, primarily  the Chinese, are sending products/design knock‐offs in increasing quantities to the U.S. market as well.       Distribution ‐ Distribution in the industry is dominated by an independently owned and operated dealer  network.  Within this network, the six dominant players manufacture what is referred to in the industry as  Grade “A” furniture.  These manufacturers do not allow for ownership in any of the other dominant  manufacturers’ dealerships. Major manufacturer exclusivity is and will for the foreseeable future continue to  be a factor.  The major manufacturers also tend to align around a philosophy preventing significant  consolidation within the channel of ownership which is not local.     Some furniture sales in the industry are done through Office Depot, Staples and United Stationers.  Product  sold through these channels however is mostly transactional in nature and represents a very small order size  of primarily mid‐market level furniture (Grade “B” and “C” furniture).  Staples does have a number of contract  furniture offices selling the Allsteel product line which is a subset of HNI.       The independent dealer, regardless of manufacturer affiliation, sells contract furniture to a customer and then  wraps that sale in value added services such as delivery, installation and design which in a typical dealership                                                                                                                                                                                          Page | 4   
  7. 7.     can be as much as 10% to 20% of top line sales.  Dealers also sell services to customers which are classified as  post‐sale. These would include move management, project management, design, asset management, storage,  refurbishment, cleaning and maintenance. These services typically sell at a 40%‐45% margin and could  represent 10% to 20% of dealer’s gross sales.  Dealers also stimulate sales with dealer owned websites, e‐ commerce and catalog sales as a means of having multiple portals to their local markets.    Additional manufacturer channels also include direct sales, e‐commerce and company owned stores though  none are of significant size. These channels constitute minimal competition to the dealers and do not have any  significant market penetration.    Changes that Have Affected the Industry  Choquette and Morris fully understand the fundamentals of this market and the need for a paradigm shift to  enable these dealerships to prosper in the future state.  Changes have occurred over the last twenty years  which can be counter acted with new thinking.  • The Rolling‐up of American business:  Over the last several decades, the American business  community has consolidated across many industries.  In prior decades, a dealer’s customer base  mostly consisted of thriving, locally owned clients that stood alone and purchased furniture and  interior products from a local perspective.  Today, with many businesses in the community being a  branch office of a national institution, so much furniture is purchased on national contracts which have  resulted in a reduction of gross margin.  One way to offset this is to reduce the cost of going to market  at the dealer level to match or exceed the reduction in margin.  Normal cost cutting closes some of the  gap but TCF can do more.  This calls for a new model and this is where the TCF model shifts the  paradigm.  It is through the financial leverage of combining and spreading backroom management,  infrastructure and other non‐customer facing expenses that we can enhance profitability.  This new  model will be the center of our on‐going discussion and is illustrated not only in other parts of this text  but also in our financial model.   • The Industry has Matured:  Years ago, emerging or expanding manufacturers could offer unique,  new products that could carry a 12 to 36 month competitive edge.  Many of today’s most common  furniture products were extremely leading edge at one time:  - The invention of systems furniture for a new working society (1965)  - The introduction of electrical distribution systems in furniture  - The emergence of ergonomic seating  - Connecting furniture to world renowned designers and architects  - Blending function with art and aesthetics                                                                                                                                                                                          Page | 5   
  8. 8.     Today, most manufacturers have most or all of these attributes.  As a result, contract furniture has  moved towards commoditization in spite of the fact that it is still “made to order”.   In general,  contract furniture is a maturing industry.  However, many opportunities exist in this mature market.                                                                                                                                                                                                     Page | 6   
  9. 9.      Transition Capital Fund – A Fresh Strategy    Summary  • Offer a succession plan & exit strategy for  dealer owners   • Assure a sustainable future for the dealer  • Provide access to ownership for qualified  buyers   • Create a satisfactory return for TCF investors   • Provide infrastructure: financial management and backroom solutions    The role of TCF is to provide a structured transaction whereby buyer and seller are able to transition a business  in an affordable manner providing a reasonable selling price to the seller and a reasonable transaction for the  incoming dealer principal.  Central to this is the role TCF provides in structuring the transaction, selecting high  reward‐low risk transactions and optimizing the dealerships’ performance while generating an acceptable  return to TCF investors.    The Transition Capital Fund ultimately provides a solution which satisfies the needs of all parties:   • Allows the manufacturers the ability to identify and approve an acceptable new dealer principal  • Satisfies the manufacturer’s reluctance to consolidate  • Provides the selling dealer principal with a fair price  • Is a bankable transaction  • Provides investors with a strong return  • Provides the new dealer principal with a fund alternative for ownership    TCF & One Manufacturer – With the unique attributes of our industry, it is clear that TCF will engage its  commercial activity with one and only one of the six major manufacturers.  Although TCF will safeguard the  confidentiality of all its information there is still a question of competitive forces.  Stated simply, if TCF were to  operate as a general bank and do deals with Steelcase, Knoll, Haworth and others – that might sound like a  good strategy to TCF but it is not a good strategy for the manufacturers.  If TCF were facilitating a transition in  St Louis for Herman Miller and a deal in Phoenix with Haworth – neither manufacturer would be pleased that  we were actually enabling the continued success of their competitor in spite of the fact they were in different  cities.                                                                                                                                                                                            Page | 7   
  10. 10.     Therefore, TCF is presenting its case to all six major manufacturers and the fund will ultimately negotiate an  acceptable relationship with one and only one of those firms.    The Holding Company & Transaction Mechanics  • Assemble a pool of capital  • Target $15 million & larger, healthy, profitable dealers within the chosen manufacturer’s distribution  channels  • Dealership is evaluated and priced beginning with . . .     Details reside in the unabridged version of this document.      The Management Company  Utilizing, maximizing and leveraging management resources ‐ As a TCF owned entity, the dealership has the  ability to optimize performance through the consolidation of support services.  With the role of the dealership  being to find a customer, identify a need, develop a solution for that need and then deliver that solution, the  reduction of certain expenses to their lowest possible costs is a priority for optimizing financial performance,  i.e. leveraging resources.     Details reside in the unabridged version of this document.                                                                                                                                                                                                 Page | 8   
  11. 11.   Sellers & Buyers    Our transactions will be guided by the following  criteria.  Note that we have ideal criteria which  reflect best‐in‐class metrics.  However, given the  current economic conditions, that criteria may  be too aggressive e.g. if we said we will only  entertain dealerships that have been profitable  over the last three years, that is unrealistic given  current conditions.  Therefore, we have to be more holistic about our approach and evaluation.  The  following rules for dealerships are general guidance.    Dealerships coming to TCF should  strive to have the following characteristics:  • LEGACY OWNERSHIP & FAMILY INVOLVEMENT   • INITIAL VALUATION   • ASSET PURCHASE   • KEY INDICATORS BENCHMARKING   • ASSET PERFORMANCE   • PROFITABILITY   • GROSS MARGIN   • VARIABLE v. FIXED   • OTHER POINTS OF VALUATION   • DEALER TARGETS   Details reside in the unabridged version of this document.    Qualified Buyers & New Dealer Principals ‐ Finding appropriate, qualified buyers will require much  work and diligence.    Details reside in the unabridged version of this document.    Choquette + Morris                                                                                                                                                                      Page | 9   
  12. 12.       Transition Capital Fund  Financial Model    Details reside in the unabridged version of this document.      Choquette + Morris                                                                                                                                                             Page | 10   
  13. 13.     TCF Structure & Governance    • Board of directors   • Ownership   • Key Roles & Responsibilities Choquette & Morris:                 Details reside in the unabridged version of this document.      Choquette + Morris                                                                                                                                                             Page | 11   
  14. 14.     Funding TCF (Holding & Management)                       Details reside in the unabridged version of this document.  Choquette + Morris                                                                                                                                                             Page | 12   
  15. 15.     Biographies  Roger L. Choquette  Roger graduated from American International College with a degree in  English Literature and pursued his graduate business studies at  Western New England College.                  Further details reside in the unabridged version of this document.  Choquette + Morris                                                                                                                                                             Page | 13   
  16. 16.       Evan L. Morris  A thirty‐year veteran of the distribution/dealer channel management  business and a twenty‐two year office furniture professional.  A graduate  of the Krannert School of Management, Purdue University, Evan began his  career . . .          Further details reside in the unabridged version of this document.    Choquette + Morris                                                                                                                                                             Page | 14   

×