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INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
SHOPPING REINVENTED
NEXT-GENERATION APPAREL RETAILING
WHY
“SHOPPING REINVENTED”?
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
14 BILLION RETAIL SQ FT
Source: ICSC.org
INTRO
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
19 BILLION CATALOGS
Source: CarbonRally.com
INTRO
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
Source: Royal PIngdom
234 MILLION WEB SITES
Source: Royal Pingdom
INTRO
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
1.81 TRILLION TEXTS
Source: CTIA
INTRO
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
90 TRILLION E-MAILS
Source: Royal Pingdom
INTRO
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
UNPRECEDENTED (OFTEN
UNFILTERED) DATA
The Average Consumer
is Bombarde...
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
THE POINT? ENGAGEMENT
IS MANDATORY
INTRO
QUICK HITS: INTERESTING
ENGAGEMENT TACTICS
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
DVF: HIGH DEFINITION
RUNWAYS IN THE STORE
QUICK HITS
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONQUICK HITS
BURBERRYS: FROM
RUNWAY TO ‘ADD TO CART’
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
BARNEYS: 3-D DENIM
QUICK HITS
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONQUICK HITS
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
TIMBERLAND:
ALL-CHANNEL 3-D
QUICK HITS
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
TIMBERLAND:
ALL-CHANNEL 3-D
QUICK HITS
• 3-D Microsite
• 3-D Window Di...
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONQUICK HITS
APPLE STORES: “TOURIST
ATTRACTION” CULTURE
FUNDAMENTAL SHIFTS IN
HOW WE ENGAGE SHOPPERS
SHIFT:
RELENTLESS ONSLAUGHT
OF TRANSFORMATIONAL
NEW DEVICES
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONDEVICES
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONDEVICES
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONDEVICES
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONDEVICES
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
FOREVER WIRED,
CONSTANTLY CONNECTED
DEVICES
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
INTERACTIVE TV: BIG
PLAYERS ARE INVESTING
DEVICES
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
INTERACTIVE TV: SHOPPING
FROM THE SOFA?
DEVICES
PLAYSTATION
STORE
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
NETFLIX INSURANCE POLICY:
ALL-CHANNEL INTEGRATION
DEVICES
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
ESCALATE
ALL-CHANNEL INTEGRATION:
CLIENTELING ON THE IPAD
DEVICES
SHIFT:
THE RISE OF SOCIAL
NETWORKING HAS PUT THE
CROWD IN CONTROL
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
THE “LIKE BUTTON” IS
THE EASY PART
SOCIAL
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
FACEBOOK AS A
DESTINATION
SOCIAL
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
FACEBOOK AS A
DESTINATION
SOCIAL
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
Crowdsourcing is the act of outsourcing
tasks, traditionally performed b...
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
SHOCKHOUND STORE
BUYERS BECOME
SELLERS
SOCIAL
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
BUYERS BECOME
BUYERS
SOCIAL
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
BUYERS BECOME
PROMOTERS
SOCIAL
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
BUYERS BECOME
MERCHANDISERS
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
BUYERS BECOME
MERCHANDISERS
-6 million unique visitors a month
-400,00...
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
SOCIAL GAMING: AN
UNTAPPED FRONTIER?
60M US Social Gamers
53% Women
Virt...
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
MONETIZING SOCIAL
GAMES
Whenever a My Town player is near an H&M
locat...
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
MONETIZING SOCIAL
GAMES
Whenever a player is near an H&M location,
vir...
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
MONETIZING SOCIAL
GAMES
Whenever a player is near an H&M location,
vir...
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
MONETIZING SOCIAL
GAMES
-10.6M Branded Impressions
-700,000 Online Che...
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
RETAIL THERAPY: PRODUCT
PLACEMENT IN VIRTUAL SHOPS
SHIFT:
LOCATION, LOCATION,
LOCATION
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
LOCATION BASED
SERVICES DEFINED
LOCATION
A location-based service (LBS...
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
26%
10%
63%
Consumers are interested in
allowing their phone to
automati...
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
“SHOP ALERT” TEXT
MESSAGES
LOCATION
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
DISCOUNTS FOR MOBILE
CHECK-INS
LOCATION
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
MICRO LOCAL INSIDE
THE STORE
LOCATION
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
SHOPKICK EARLY ADOPTERS
TRY VARIED TACTICS
• Special offers at Macy’s
• ...
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
ESCALATE POCKET KIOSK
ENRICHES STORE SHOPPING
LOCATION
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
• More intense, ongoing relationships with
prospective shoppers
• Engage...
SHIFT:
AUGMENTING RETAIL
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
TISSOT: SHOP WATCHES
FROM STORE WINDOWS
A/R
PLAY MOVIE
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
TISSOT: SHOP WATCHES
FROM STORE WINDOWS
A/R
85%
Sales Lift
During Two-...
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
ADOPTION IS ON
THE RISE
A/R
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
RETAILERS ARE
AUGMENTING
A/R
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
CISCO’S NEXT GEN
VIRTUAL FITTING ROOM
A/R
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
HOSTAGE WEAR: MOBILE
(AND LOCAL!) A/R STORES
Los Angeles
Moscow
Paris
Lo...
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
• Very high engagement with the brand
• Extends reach by bringing unique...
INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION
N BUILDING: A/R OVER
THE TOP (AND SIDE)?
A/R
SUMMARY &
CONCLUSIONS
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES
(SO MANY THREATS)
Market conditions, technology, c...
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES
(SO MANY THREATS)
Market conditions, technology, c...
INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL CLOSING
GETTING STARTED
1. Assign an owner (with executive sponsorship)
...
Blue Martini e-Commerce
Blue Martini Contact Center
Blue Martini Order Management
Warehouses Suppliers & 3PL Stores
Partne...
THANK YOU
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Shopping Reinvented: Next Generation Apparel Retailing

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  • Liked the social gaming aspect of the presentation and you are very right retail is indeed changing. Technology and retail have to deliver personalized shopping experience
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  • Awesome presentation now I know how to put my presentation into place here at slideshare..thanks for the info!!!!
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  • Wow,it is really useful presentation and will be highly appreciated if you can share this presentation for me as dunglt@ionevn.vn. Thank much.
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  • Wow, very good presentation. May I have this file for reference of my study? My email is paramita.citraprana@gmail.com . Lot of thanks!
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  • Interesante presentación sobre las nuevas tendencias en plataformas para conectarse con los consumidores...
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  • Average person is bombarded with 34GB of data per day
    Wal*Mart databases are estimated to be >2.5PB
    Total amount of data in existence in 2010 = ~1.2ZB

    Challenge to store and manage all that data; Opportunity to leverage the data into actionable information. Challenge that customers expect us to put that data to use to enhance their shopping experiences.
  • In a connected world where access to information is fluid and overwhelming - and transparency is the expectation, brands must actively take part in the conversation, otherwise their customers will do so without them.

    During our session today we will share ideas, tools and technologies that may spark ideas to help you meet their demands for change and possibly help you reinvent shopping for your customers. Some of the ideas are “today” ideas, and some may –or may not be -- be “tomorrow” ideas. But we think all of them are, at a minimum, thought-provoking.

    Along the way we’ll try to give you insight how to add some of the “today” ideas to your strategy and we hope you find value in our content and also hope you have a little fun with us along the way.
  • Some designers are trying to sandwich tradition and technology. Diane von Furstenberg will show her spring 2011 collection on Sunday, and the company is live streaming it to a select group of bloggers at her store-turned-lounge, which is open to the public for most of the weekend. But the technology in the lounge — touch screens mounted on the wall, Web-enabled printers and PCs — will feature the fall and resort wear already in stores.
    “The shows have always been for the trade,” said Paula Sutter, president of the company. “It’s important to sell what’s in the store.”
  • And in the most aggressive outreach, Burberry, the British design house, will not only stream its women’s runway show live from London, but also will allow anyone with a computer and a credit card to order the merchandise as models strut in it.
    “It’s giving the consumer even more inside access than the buyer in the front row,” said James Gardner, founder and chief executive of Createthe Group, which is working on the runway live streams for Marc Jacobs and Burberry. “They’re able to put the product in their shopping bag, pay with their credit card and check out before the buyer is even finished watching the show and goes to the showroom the next day.”
    Burberry’s strategy represents a huge change from the past, when a literal golden ticket was the only way to see its show. The anointed — buyers from Barneys, editors from Vogue, actresses like Claire Danes — were sent an engraved antique brass entry card. This time, in addition to the online access, 1,500 people will be invited to Burberry stores worldwide, where they will watch the show on high-definition screens and be able to order merchandise immediately via an iPad app.
    “Technology is the enabler,” said Christopher Bailey, chief creative officer at Burberry. “This gives them an opportunity to feel that energy and feel the attitude of what you’re working on. I find it incredibly liberating.”
  • Upscale retailer Barneys New York Inc. in late August sent a less-than-ordinary promotional e-mail about the latest denim fashions to the 450,000 consumers in its database. The e-mail linked shoppers to a digitally enhanced catalog at Barneysmag.com that featured 3-D images, streamed pop music and videos, and which connected consumers directly to the featured styles for sale on Barneys.com with one click.
    “The whole idea is you see the style on the page and it takes you straight to that page on Barneys.com. We wanted to make it as seamless as possible,” says Neal Gray, president of CTN Digital, the marketing and design firm that created the 3-D catalog. Other CTN Digital clients include cosmetics maker Estee Lauder, clothing designer John Varvatos and cable channel AMC.
    Gray says that some visitors are spending 15 to 20 minutes with the Barneys catalog as they interact with the videos and other Flash-supported rich media, such as the information boxes that appear when a consumer hovers her mouse over a particular page element. Each catalog page features links to Barneys.com that consumers can share via Facebook and Twitter.   
    Consumers need 3-D glasses to get the full effect, however. If a consumer doesn’t have a pair, she can fill out a form to have a pair mailed to her. Gray says the mix of online and offline elements also helps Barneys confirm that the e-mail addresses of its most engaged consumers are active.
    Barneys e-commerce executives insisted that the digital catalog be viewable with devices that don’t support Flash technology, such as Apple’s iPad, when the two firms began developing the catalog three months ago. The CTN Digital team manually recoded all the media elements Barneys provided, such as the art house-style videos of models wearing the featured denims, to work in HTML5, which the iPad can process. “Our plan for CTN Digital is to meld together the best of web, video, audio and print into one dynamic platform. Our clients are all looking for a new, dynamic experience where people can view and purchase in whichever environment they are in so it covers all type of software and hardware,” Gray says.
    “CTN Digital has transformed our 3-D mailer into an innovative online shopping and entertainment experience. Their leading-edge technology is consistent with the expectations of our customers,” says Larry Promisel, vice president of e-commerce at Barneys New York. Gray says Barneys is planning to run another multimedia catalog for the holidays.
  • The Timberland Co.Apparel / AccessoriesOnline Sales:$15,000,000 Growth:15.4% See More has kicked off a marketing campaign that uses high-end technology, including 3-D displays, to promote items the retailer says are good for the earth.

    The outdoor apparel  and footwear manufacturer and retailer, No.436 in the Internet Retailer Top 500 Guide, is promoting its Earthkeepers collection—an assortment of products made with reused materials such as recycled rubber and plastic bottles. Timberland's campaign employs a variety of channels, including TV and print advertising, 3-D displays in select Timberland retail stores worldwide, social media and an interactive microsite.
    "We hope the variety of elements in this campaign—from digital and social to in-store to more traditional media–might encourage all consumers, no matter where they see us, to be drawn in," says Jim Davey, Timberland's vice president of global marketing. "We want to give consumers the opportunity to learn more about what Timberland is doing to help protect the outdoors, as well as support them in taking environmental action themselves, whether that action is buying a pair of boots or planting a tree."

    The campaign includes a Nature Needs Heroes microsite which uses 360-degree imagery and high-definition 3-D technology to show visitors how small acts, such as recycling a water bottle, can make a difference.  The retailer also enables shoppers to zoom in on each article of clothing that the character in the short online video is wearing, with options to zoom further into details such as the lining and pockets of a jacket. Rollovers provide environmental details­—a pair of jeans goes through an ecological wash process, for instance, or a boot’s laces are constructed using recycled water bottles. Visitors can use a tool to horizontally scroll across their screen to turn the model and see a 360-degree view of him and all the products he is wearing.
    Timberland’s retail store windows also will depict the Nature Needs Heroes microsite sequences via 3-D graphics, viewable through free 3-D glasses made from recycled materials that Timberland will hand out to shoppers. Point-of-sale stations in stores will show an x-ray into Timberland’s Earthkeepers 2.0 boot, which is made from recycled materials.
    Additionally, Timberland plans to launch a Virtual Forest Facebook app that enables users to create or join a friend’s forest to support Timberland’s program to plant trees in Haiti.
  • The Timberland Co.Apparel / AccessoriesOnline Sales:$15,000,000 Growth:15.4% See More has kicked off a marketing campaign that uses high-end technology, including 3-D displays, to promote items the retailer says are good for the earth.

    The outdoor apparel  and footwear manufacturer and retailer, No.436 in the Internet Retailer Top 500 Guide, is promoting its Earthkeepers collection—an assortment of products made with reused materials such as recycled rubber and plastic bottles. Timberland's campaign employs a variety of channels, including TV and print advertising, 3-D displays in select Timberland retail stores worldwide, social media and an interactive microsite.
    "We hope the variety of elements in this campaign—from digital and social to in-store to more traditional media–might encourage all consumers, no matter where they see us, to be drawn in," says Jim Davey, Timberland's vice president of global marketing. "We want to give consumers the opportunity to learn more about what Timberland is doing to help protect the outdoors, as well as support them in taking environmental action themselves, whether that action is buying a pair of boots or planting a tree."

    The campaign includes a Nature Needs Heroes microsite which uses 360-degree imagery and high-definition 3-D technology to show visitors how small acts, such as recycling a water bottle, can make a difference.  The retailer also enables shoppers to zoom in on each article of clothing that the character in the short online video is wearing, with options to zoom further into details such as the lining and pockets of a jacket. Rollovers provide environmental details­—a pair of jeans goes through an ecological wash process, for instance, or a boot’s laces are constructed using recycled water bottles. Visitors can use a tool to horizontally scroll across their screen to turn the model and see a 360-degree view of him and all the products he is wearing.
    Timberland’s retail store windows also will depict the Nature Needs Heroes microsite sequences via 3-D graphics, viewable through free 3-D glasses made from recycled materials that Timberland will hand out to shoppers. Point-of-sale stations in stores will show an x-ray into Timberland’s Earthkeepers 2.0 boot, which is made from recycled materials.
    Additionally, Timberland plans to launch a Virtual Forest Facebook app that enables users to create or join a friend’s forest to support Timberland’s program to plant trees in Haiti.
  • On Apple's earnings call, you probably didn't catch that Apple set a new retail foot traffic record last quarter, what with all the iPad supply fears and Steve Jobs ranting. But they did: more than 74.5 million people went to one of the 317 Apple stores across the world.
    Only a small percentage of them actually bought anything, but that's the point. Apple has managed to transform *hanging out in their stores* into entertainment. Of course, kids have been loitering in malls for decades, but the Apple store experience is far more specific. It's about playing with all the neat Apple stuff.
    The crazy thing is that the company's reach and popularity mean that a big chunk of the world's rich youth are all experiencing the APPLE STORE TRIP together. I think it will be a cultural touchpoint for decades -- like the cinema of Fellini's Italy or the department store in turn-of-the-century America -- even if Apple wanes.
  • Posting items to Facebook and adding a Like Button are the easy part. We’re here today to talk about compelling new ways to engage the crowd in your brand and make them part of the process of developing, promoting and selling product…
  • As a Shock Store proprietor, you’ll be able to design and personalize your own online store, stock it with everything from T-shirts and hoodies to vinyl albums and record players, trick it out with video or written content from ShockHound, and link it to from (and advertise it on) your MySpace, Facebook or other social networking pages. It costs you absolutely nothing, it’s easy to set up and manage, we do all the shipping for you, and we’ll pay you a commission on every single item you sell.  
  • Susan Gregg Koger is a lot like her customers. The 25-year-old co-founder of ModCloth, a $15 million online clothing retailer based in Pittsburgh, Koger lives and breathes fashion, eschewing mainstream mall taste in favor of offbeat, often vintage-inspired pieces such as floral housedresses and flapper hats. "Our customers are young women in their 20s who live for fashion-forward clothes the same way we do," says Koger. ModCloth has always prided itself on having an open channel of communication with customers, through, for example, frequent contests and an active Twitter feed. Says Koger: "Our internal motto is 'ModCloth is a company you're friends with.' " So she decided to do what any good friend would do: take her customers shopping with her and ask for their advice before making a big purchase.

    In October, ModCloth began asking customers to help the company decide whether to carry certain items in its store. ModCloth's initiative, called Be the Buyer, encourages customers to vote online on clothing samples. If a garment receives enough votes, ModCloth will sell the item.
    In the past, Koger and her three-person buying team relied on their own fashion sense to select the items offered on ModCloth.com. They traveled around the country, sifting primarily through small collections from independent designers. But the buying team sometimes found clothing samples it loved but couldn't afford to purchase because of the minimum order size. Clothing manufacturers generally need large order commitments -- typically anywhere from 120 to 500 pieces, says Koger -- before committing to production. If a larger retailer hadn't already plucked a certain sample out of the lineup, ModCloth often wouldn't risk committing to the kind of large-scale purchase needed to push it into production.
    But now, says Koger, the company can confidently gamble on what were once risky items by securing the most valuable of opinions before taking the plunge -- those of its customers. Each sample is put up for a vote on ModCloth's website for 14 days, and after tallying the votes, the company decides whether it's worth the investment. If an item is picked, the customers who voted in favor of it receive an e-mail when their chosen design becomes available for sale. There is also a comments section for each garment and a feature that lets customers send a link to the clothes to their Facebook and Twitter friends.
    Koger says the program benefits everyone involved. Not only do the customers get to play a firsthand role in choosing their own fashions, but ModCloth reduces much of the guesswork involved in fashion buying. "The customers are helping us make a safer financial bet by eliminating the risk," says Liz Bensink, ModCloth's site manager. "Now if we order some of those samples, they'll be exclusive to ModCloth, and we already know that our customers voted them into existence." Plus, the designers get a chance to produce the clothes that larger, more mainstream outlets passed on.
    The first batch of 66 product samples appeared on ModCloth's site in late October. By the end of November, those items had received more than 100,000 customer votes, and Koger had decided to carry about 40 percent of them. Molly Miltenberger, a regular ModCloth shopper, weighed in on some of the samples. A self-proclaimed scarf lover, she voted in favor of a green plaid scarf with tassels and another brightly colored striped one with pompon fringe. Only the latter received enough votes to make it into production, but Miltenberger says that's OK. She will buy the one that will be produced. Plus, she is thrilled that the company is letting her vicariously experience her "dream career" of being a professional buyer.
    In addition to the votes, ModCloth also received thousands of comments, some of which were harsh -- and often amusing. One customer quipped about a printed yellow dress, "It looks like a cat shred a '70s polyester and then threw up on the shreds." Of another multicolored outfit, a shopper wrote, "I like the cut, but the pattern makes me want to kill myself."
    Snarky or not, the comments reflect a high level of customer engagement. Plus, many of the remarks proved insightful, says Bensink. For instance, a heather-gray cotton dress, which did not make it into production, got a fair number of yes votes, but commenters kept pointing out the same flaw in the dress: It was too sheer. In the future, ModCloth may even consider asking a designer to make changes based on the criticisms of customers. "The customers are letting us know why they voted the way they did," Bensink says, "and the point is to see how comments and votes translate to sales."
    It's too early to tell what the exact conversion will be, says Koger, but the initiative has already boosted traffic to ModCloth.com. The number of visitors increased 25 percent in the first month after launch, partly because enthusiastic participants were promoting their favorite samples on their Facebook pages, Twitter feeds, and personal blogs. Thrilled by the response, the ModCloth team has continued to add new samples to the voting page. "Items are getting 50 votes mere minutes after we upload them on the site," says Bensink. "It's so exciting for us to watch. We had this customer base ready to interact with us, and we just needed to give them a proper forum."
  • Social shopping site Kaboodle, which was acquired by Hearst Interactive Group in 2007 for $30 million or so, is trying its hand at social commerce with new community-driven flash sales site PopPicks.
    PopPicks, which is members-only, partners with a retailer each week to feature a collection of products. The Kaboodle community is then invited to vote for the products they like best. After four days of voting, the most liked products are made available to Kaboodle members at an steeply discounted prices for four days or until the inventory is sold out.
    While Kaboodle is a little late to the online sample sale game, with the element of voting, PopPicks has a slightly different take on the flash-sales model that Gilt Groupe, Ideeli, Hautelook, Beyond The Rack and others have seen success with. The ability to vote on what clothes go on sale could be a compelling feature to the flash-sales market. Initially, PopPicks will feature primarily fashion apparel and accessories and will eventually broaden its offering to include retail brands in home, beauty and gadgets.
    Kaboodle, which underwent a realtime makeover earlier this year, has over 1 million registered users. Launched in 2005, Kaboodle faces competition from ThisNext, Like.com and Sugar’s ShopStyle.
  • It’s no secret that social games are one of the hottest (and potentially most lucrative) aspects of social networks today.
    But it’s a mistake to think that casual, social network-based games are just for web geeks. A new study from market research firm NPD Group shows that one out of every five Americans over the age of six has played an online social game at least once. Altogether, that’s nearly 60 million Americans, adults and kids alike.
    For a relatively new entrant to the gaming market, social gaming has made a huge debut.
    These figures are good news for social networks, which have traditionally relied on advertising dollars to flesh out post-VC budgets. Social games can help create a new revenue stream, one that solely relies on end users opening their wallets to third-party applications. Virtual goods and currencies are a huge part of the social gaming market, and they turn a casual user experience into big business for the startups, developers and platforms that offer them.
    NPD’s study shows that 10% of respondents had spent money playing social games and 11% said they planned to do so in the future.
    In 2009, Internet () users bought around $2.2 billion worth of virtual goods; experts forecast that number will increase to $6 billion by 2013. And the best-performing social games can inspire repeat purchases in around 41% of users. Some stats peg North American gamers’ average expenditure per user of $74 over just four months.
    As far as demographics are concerned, this study shows that the social gaming crowd tends to be older and female; around 53% of players are women. To those unaccustomed to looking at video game demographic stats, a 49/53 split might seem fairly even; however, this number bucks a decades-long trend of women as the minority in the ranks of video game players. Traditionally, males dominate when it comes to console game purchase and use; female adoption of social games is a remarkable change from this norm.
    Another interesting point in this study is that most of these social gamers have never played a traditional video game; 35% have no previous gaming experience whatsoever.
    According to other research, the average social gamer tends to be female and around 43 years old. Facebook () is the most popular destination for online games, with 83% of respondents saying they have played games there. The average player has played six social games.
    Do you think the meteoric rise in user adoption and investor attention in social gaming will continue? How do you feel about the popularity of games such as Zynga’s FarmVille or other titles from companies like RockYou, Playfish and Playdom? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.
  • Through the partnership, a virtual good like a knit top will appear in the game whenever a player is near an H&M location. If they check-in, they’ll get discounts and promotions for real goods on sale. There’s also other special H&M-themed gameplay — a scratch card that looks like a Lotto ticket might pop up and give players extra points.

    NEW YORK – Apparel and accessories retailer H&M delivered 10.6 million branded impressions to mobile users checking into venues in the MyTown location-based mobile social game, according to a panelist at the Digiday:Apps conference.
    H&M partnered with MyTown to drive awareness of its products and encourage engagement with its “The Blues” promotion that featured the retailer’s blue-colored items. MyTown users who checked-in to H&M stores or other nearby locations were able to earn points that could be used to buy branded H&M virtual goods in the application.
    “For us, it was interesting that the promotion was using virtual goods and virtual points to incentivize real-time activity,” said Rachel Veiga, associate media director at MediaCom, Middletown, NY. “For brands like H&M, that’s key.
    “It’s about driving foot traffic to stores, not just getting them to play,” she said. “We’re working on the next evolution of this – how do we get people to purchase?”
    The “Brands and Apps: It’s all about social activity” panel discussion was moderated by Chris Cunningham, CEO of appssavvy, New York.
    The other panelists were Damon Burrell, vice president of marketing at MTV, New York; and Oz Solomon, cofounder of Social Graph Studios, Toronto.
    Booyah is the developer of MyTown, and Appssavvy, which serves as Booyah’s direct sales team, facilitated the H&M partnership.
    Driving engagement via MyTown The campaign, which launched earlier this year was the first partnership between MyTown and any brand (see story).
    H&M’s objective was to engage the 2 million-plus users on MyTown and let them know about the various items for sale in the Blues collection.
    MyTown users accumulated 700,000 check-ins over the course of the campaign.
    Additionally, H&M became the most searched retail brand on MyTown.
    “We had to build excitement and get people into the store to find clothes maybe they wouldn’t normally go in for,” Ms. Veiga said. “We wanted to reach people around the stores and get them into the stores.
    “How do you leverage social activity already happening in these [digital] locations and drive them to the real location itself?” she said. “We decided to reward users who interacted with MyTown, checking into locations nearby H&M."
    Location and product check-ins Users who checked-in to certain locations near H&M stores received messages about the retailer’s items.
    Checking-in earned participating MyTown members points, which they could use to buy H&M-branded virtual goods from The Blues collection.
    Users could then find actual pricing information for the virtual items.
    H&M is also connecting with potential customers via a new MyTown feature that lets members check-in specific products to earn points.
    MyTown users can check-in products by scanning their bar codes or snapping a picture with their mobile phones.
    Members logged 350,000 product check-ins within a week of the feature’s launch.
    H&M is using these check-ins to drive awareness of its Denim Day promotion.
    MyTown members who scan H&M products are automatically entered into a sweepstakes for a $500 dollar gift card.
    Regular users of the application have responded well to the branded promotions, per MediaCom.
    “MyTown users seeing a brand in the application for the first time gave a very positive response,” Ms. Veiga said. “It wasn’t intrusive and it tied into something they were already doing.
    “We were just giving them points for something they were interested in,” she said.

  • Through the partnership, a virtual good like a knit top will appear in the game whenever a player is near an H&M location. If they check-in, they’ll get discounts and promotions for real goods on sale. There’s also other special H&M-themed gameplay — a scratch card that looks like a Lotto ticket might pop up and give players extra points.

    NEW YORK – Apparel and accessories retailer H&M delivered 10.6 million branded impressions to mobile users checking into venues in the MyTown location-based mobile social game, according to a panelist at the Digiday:Apps conference.
    H&M partnered with MyTown to drive awareness of its products and encourage engagement with its “The Blues” promotion that featured the retailer’s blue-colored items. MyTown users who checked-in to H&M stores or other nearby locations were able to earn points that could be used to buy branded H&M virtual goods in the application.
    “For us, it was interesting that the promotion was using virtual goods and virtual points to incentivize real-time activity,” said Rachel Veiga, associate media director at MediaCom, Middletown, NY. “For brands like H&M, that’s key.
    “It’s about driving foot traffic to stores, not just getting them to play,” she said. “We’re working on the next evolution of this – how do we get people to purchase?”
    The “Brands and Apps: It’s all about social activity” panel discussion was moderated by Chris Cunningham, CEO of appssavvy, New York.
    The other panelists were Damon Burrell, vice president of marketing at MTV, New York; and Oz Solomon, cofounder of Social Graph Studios, Toronto.
    Booyah is the developer of MyTown, and Appssavvy, which serves as Booyah’s direct sales team, facilitated the H&M partnership.
    Driving engagement via MyTown The campaign, which launched earlier this year was the first partnership between MyTown and any brand (see story).
    H&M’s objective was to engage the 2 million-plus users on MyTown and let them know about the various items for sale in the Blues collection.
    MyTown users accumulated 700,000 check-ins over the course of the campaign.
    Additionally, H&M became the most searched retail brand on MyTown.
    “We had to build excitement and get people into the store to find clothes maybe they wouldn’t normally go in for,” Ms. Veiga said. “We wanted to reach people around the stores and get them into the stores.
    “How do you leverage social activity already happening in these [digital] locations and drive them to the real location itself?” she said. “We decided to reward users who interacted with MyTown, checking into locations nearby H&M."
    Location and product check-ins Users who checked-in to certain locations near H&M stores received messages about the retailer’s items.
    Checking-in earned participating MyTown members points, which they could use to buy H&M-branded virtual goods from The Blues collection.
    Users could then find actual pricing information for the virtual items.
    H&M is also connecting with potential customers via a new MyTown feature that lets members check-in specific products to earn points.
    MyTown users can check-in products by scanning their bar codes or snapping a picture with their mobile phones.
    Members logged 350,000 product check-ins within a week of the feature’s launch.
    H&M is using these check-ins to drive awareness of its Denim Day promotion.
    MyTown members who scan H&M products are automatically entered into a sweepstakes for a $500 dollar gift card.
    Regular users of the application have responded well to the branded promotions, per MediaCom.
    “MyTown users seeing a brand in the application for the first time gave a very positive response,” Ms. Veiga said. “It wasn’t intrusive and it tied into something they were already doing.
    “We were just giving them points for something they were interested in,” she said.

  • Through the partnership, a virtual good like a knit top will appear in the game whenever a player is near an H&M location. If they check-in, they’ll get discounts and promotions for real goods on sale. There’s also other special H&M-themed gameplay — a scratch card that looks like a Lotto ticket might pop up and give players extra points.

    NEW YORK – Apparel and accessories retailer H&M delivered 10.6 million branded impressions to mobile users checking into venues in the MyTown location-based mobile social game, according to a panelist at the Digiday:Apps conference.
    H&M partnered with MyTown to drive awareness of its products and encourage engagement with its “The Blues” promotion that featured the retailer’s blue-colored items. MyTown users who checked-in to H&M stores or other nearby locations were able to earn points that could be used to buy branded H&M virtual goods in the application.
    “For us, it was interesting that the promotion was using virtual goods and virtual points to incentivize real-time activity,” said Rachel Veiga, associate media director at MediaCom, Middletown, NY. “For brands like H&M, that’s key.
    “It’s about driving foot traffic to stores, not just getting them to play,” she said. “We’re working on the next evolution of this – how do we get people to purchase?”
    The “Brands and Apps: It’s all about social activity” panel discussion was moderated by Chris Cunningham, CEO of appssavvy, New York.
    The other panelists were Damon Burrell, vice president of marketing at MTV, New York; and Oz Solomon, cofounder of Social Graph Studios, Toronto.
    Booyah is the developer of MyTown, and Appssavvy, which serves as Booyah’s direct sales team, facilitated the H&M partnership.
    Driving engagement via MyTown The campaign, which launched earlier this year was the first partnership between MyTown and any brand (see story).
    H&M’s objective was to engage the 2 million-plus users on MyTown and let them know about the various items for sale in the Blues collection.
    MyTown users accumulated 700,000 check-ins over the course of the campaign.
    Additionally, H&M became the most searched retail brand on MyTown.
    “We had to build excitement and get people into the store to find clothes maybe they wouldn’t normally go in for,” Ms. Veiga said. “We wanted to reach people around the stores and get them into the stores.
    “How do you leverage social activity already happening in these [digital] locations and drive them to the real location itself?” she said. “We decided to reward users who interacted with MyTown, checking into locations nearby H&M."
    Location and product check-ins Users who checked-in to certain locations near H&M stores received messages about the retailer’s items.
    Checking-in earned participating MyTown members points, which they could use to buy H&M-branded virtual goods from The Blues collection.
    Users could then find actual pricing information for the virtual items.
    H&M is also connecting with potential customers via a new MyTown feature that lets members check-in specific products to earn points.
    MyTown users can check-in products by scanning their bar codes or snapping a picture with their mobile phones.
    Members logged 350,000 product check-ins within a week of the feature’s launch.
    H&M is using these check-ins to drive awareness of its Denim Day promotion.
    MyTown members who scan H&M products are automatically entered into a sweepstakes for a $500 dollar gift card.
    Regular users of the application have responded well to the branded promotions, per MediaCom.
    “MyTown users seeing a brand in the application for the first time gave a very positive response,” Ms. Veiga said. “It wasn’t intrusive and it tied into something they were already doing.
    “We were just giving them points for something they were interested in,” she said.

  • Through the partnership, a virtual good like a knit top will appear in the game whenever a player is near an H&M location. If they check-in, they’ll get discounts and promotions for real goods on sale. There’s also other special H&M-themed gameplay — a scratch card that looks like a Lotto ticket might pop up and give players extra points.

    NEW YORK – Apparel and accessories retailer H&M delivered 10.6 million branded impressions to mobile users checking into venues in the MyTown location-based mobile social game, according to a panelist at the Digiday:Apps conference.
    H&M partnered with MyTown to drive awareness of its products and encourage engagement with its “The Blues” promotion that featured the retailer’s blue-colored items. MyTown users who checked-in to H&M stores or other nearby locations were able to earn points that could be used to buy branded H&M virtual goods in the application.
    “For us, it was interesting that the promotion was using virtual goods and virtual points to incentivize real-time activity,” said Rachel Veiga, associate media director at MediaCom, Middletown, NY. “For brands like H&M, that’s key.
    “It’s about driving foot traffic to stores, not just getting them to play,” she said. “We’re working on the next evolution of this – how do we get people to purchase?”
    The “Brands and Apps: It’s all about social activity” panel discussion was moderated by Chris Cunningham, CEO of appssavvy, New York.
    The other panelists were Damon Burrell, vice president of marketing at MTV, New York; and Oz Solomon, cofounder of Social Graph Studios, Toronto.
    Booyah is the developer of MyTown, and Appssavvy, which serves as Booyah’s direct sales team, facilitated the H&M partnership.
    Driving engagement via MyTown The campaign, which launched earlier this year was the first partnership between MyTown and any brand (see story).
    H&M’s objective was to engage the 2 million-plus users on MyTown and let them know about the various items for sale in the Blues collection.
    MyTown users accumulated 700,000 check-ins over the course of the campaign.
    Additionally, H&M became the most searched retail brand on MyTown.
    “We had to build excitement and get people into the store to find clothes maybe they wouldn’t normally go in for,” Ms. Veiga said. “We wanted to reach people around the stores and get them into the stores.
    “How do you leverage social activity already happening in these [digital] locations and drive them to the real location itself?” she said. “We decided to reward users who interacted with MyTown, checking into locations nearby H&M."
    Location and product check-ins Users who checked-in to certain locations near H&M stores received messages about the retailer’s items.
    Checking-in earned participating MyTown members points, which they could use to buy H&M-branded virtual goods from The Blues collection.
    Users could then find actual pricing information for the virtual items.
    H&M is also connecting with potential customers via a new MyTown feature that lets members check-in specific products to earn points.
    MyTown users can check-in products by scanning their bar codes or snapping a picture with their mobile phones.
    Members logged 350,000 product check-ins within a week of the feature’s launch.
    H&M is using these check-ins to drive awareness of its Denim Day promotion.
    MyTown members who scan H&M products are automatically entered into a sweepstakes for a $500 dollar gift card.
    Regular users of the application have responded well to the branded promotions, per MediaCom.
    “MyTown users seeing a brand in the application for the first time gave a very positive response,” Ms. Veiga said. “It wasn’t intrusive and it tied into something they were already doing.
    “We were just giving them points for something they were interested in,” she said.

  • Sugar Inc., the media company behind the popular collection of sugar-centric blogs (PopSugar, FabSugar, BellaSugar), is now dipping its well manicured toe into virtual gaming with the launch of PopSugar’s Retail Therapy. As the name suggests, this Facebook app aims to be the FarmVille of shopping. After a quiet, soft launch last week, the site has grown from 50 users to nearly 4,000, says Sugar’s founder and CEO, Brian Sugar. That’s a far cry from the tens of millions of users who diligently fertilize crops on Farmville’s acres, but PopSugar’s Retail Therapy has potential. The game has the power and eyeballs of Sugar’s network at its disposal (the consortium averages 16 million uniques per month) and Retail Therapy has already forged partnerships with several high-profile fashion labels, including Diane Von Furstenberg, Gap, Barneys New York, Juicy Couture, Tory Burch and TopShop. The basic format of the game is simple. Each user owns and manages a boutique and builds the store from the bottom up. When a user signs up, she receives $2,500 in coins (and yes, it is always a she— in the world of Retail Therapy there are no male avatars available). She can then use that money for virtual clothing, to design the boutique with furnishings and to purchase inventory for the store. The user selects inventory from a catalog of virtual goods which are actually replicas of real life, in-season products from the retail partners (the ultimate product placement). That inventory, Sugar says, will be refreshed frequently to reflect any real world changes. Once a user has retrieved and unpacked inventory, computer generated avatars intermittently shuffle into the store to peruse and purchase goods. Facebook friends on Retail Therapy can also visit and make purchases or sign up to be your store’s sales representatives (anyone can simultaneously manage a boutique and work for a friend’s store). With every purchase you earn new coins and for various actions (like ordering inventory, unpacking it, etc. ), you also earn experience points which will help you access new levels. With each new level— there are currently more than 40— you unlock new products for purchase. Furthermore, if you want to get additional coins for Retail Therapy, you also have the option to purchase them through Facebook Credits. Fundamentally, Retail Therapy is not radically different from rival Facebook games like Fashion World and Mall World, but PopSugar’s version is the best at bridging virtual and real world shopping. In the game, avatars can explore virtual TopShop and Diane Von Furstenberg stores, get additional information on those real world products and find links to make actual purchases. Although Facebook Credits is an obvious revenue stream, the game’s real worth could ultimately lie in these retail partnerships. Depending on the evolution of these partnerships and the site’s success, major vendors may be willing to sign lucrative contracts in exchange  for creative marketing opportunities. Sugar says he’s concentrating on building out the user base for now but he would like to explore new retail opportunities, like offering loyal customers discounts at their favorite retailers or special in-house sample sales. As the business strategy develops organically, Sugar says he will also definitely create a high level of integration with Sugar’s various websites, through cross-promotion and the creation of special events built around editorial content. For example, during Oscars coverage, PopSugar might promote a limited supply of Red Carpet items on Retail Therapy. For all its potential, Retail Therapy has significant challenges. From a current base of 4,000, the site will need to number in the millions in order to matter in this market. Mall World has more than 4 million active users, Fashion World has more than 2 million. Unlike other virtual world gaming services, like Zynga or IMVU, Sugar is also walking in foreign territory. The network has built a business on creating influential blogs, not viral Facebook games. Sugar acknowledges that they will have to build out their current team, with additional game managers,  to establish a sufficient support network for Retail Therapy. “We have a pretty great blogging platform that hundreds of thousands of people use and we have… community managers that help those out…We’re going to have to rapidly follow that model here because of the rate of adoption of people using it and people talking about various different issues and problems that they have.  We’re going to have to offer that level of support. I think we knew we had to do, but we didn’t think we had to do it so quickly,” Sugar says. Update: TechCrunch readers who sign up, can get an extra $2,500 coins through this link. CrunchBase InformationSugarBrian SugarInformation provided by CrunchBase
  • According to a survey by the Mobile Marketing Association (MMA), one in four U.S. adults use mobile location-based services. And nearly half of those users responded in some fashion to location-based ads.
    By comparison, 37 percent of the survey respondents noticed any ads while sending/receiving texted messages and 28 percent noticed an ad while browsing the mobile web.
    The survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adult consumers in mid-March gauged consumer’s responsiveness to location-based advertising (LBA). Of the respondents, 91 percent have a cellphone and 26 percent of that group have used a “map, navigation or some other mobile phone service that automatically determines your current location.”
    Other findings from the survey:
    Ten percent of all cellphone owners use location-based mobile services at least once per week
    Adults ages 25-34 are frequent users of location services, with 22 percent using them at least once a week.
    Sixty-three percent of iPhone owners use location-based mobile services at least once per week
    Respondents said they use these services most frequently to “locate nearby points of interest, shops or services.”
    Consumers are interested in allowing their phone to automatically share their location in exchange for perks, such as free use of mobile applications and mobile coupons.
  • Location-based ad and alert companies Placecast and Location Labs have teamed up to send shopping alerts to more than 180 million consumers across multiple cell phone networks.
    The companies are creating ShopAlerts, which are location-triggered text messages sent from brands to consumers who opt into the service. The companies claim they can use the service to reach as many as 60 percent of U.S. consumers. The two companies are working on ShopAlert brand campaigns for retailers such as The North Face. More brands are signing up on a monthly basis, the companies say.
    Placecast’s ShopAlerts service is a white-label mobile marketing tool. Retailers and other direct marketers deploy the technology to create their own version of the service. Consumers who agree to receive the messages can opt into them while they’re at a store, online, browsing text messages, or visiting mobile web sites or social networks. Once ShopAlerts are activated, the service automatically alerts the consumer about a brand’s local sales, special events, or other relevant information based on their location.
    Combining location information and target marketing is called geo-fencing.
    Location Labs allows Placecast to locate phones using its Location-As-a-Service Platform. The platform lets developers incorporate real-time location of smartphones and feature phones based on data from carrier partners. It does not require end users to download an app to their phone. Placecast CEO Alistair Goodman said the partnership with Location Labs gives the company a much greater reach than it would otherwise have.
    Placecast was founded in 2005. It raised $8 million in a second round of funding in March. Investors include Quatrex Capital, Onset Ventures and Voyager Capital.
    Some rival services such as ShopKick are based on apps, which only a small percentage of people are likely to have downloaded. Another rival is Xtify, which also does geo-relevant mobile messaging.
  • Smartphone app Loopt launched a mobile loyalty program June 1 that will enable consumers to win rewards from partner retailers, such as Starbucks and The Gap.
    Other marketers running initiatives on the platform include Universal Music Group and Stanford University. Checking into bars with two Facebook friends can earn consumers access to five free MP3s from Universal artists. Consumers who check in to Stanford's 2010 commencement events will win graduation gifts.
    Consumers can use Loopt Star to win other rewards, including coupons from participating companies, by meeting brand-specific actions, such as checking into a location a requisite number of times or referring it to Facebook friends.
    Loopt has been developing the platform since January, said Sam Altman, co-founder and CEO of the company.
    “This was in development very much in response to advertisers asking for this product,” he said. “They would describe what their ideal mobile advertising model was. Everybody liked cost-per-click better because it was more traffickable.”
    Altman added that brands can customize Loopt Star to meet their needs and goals. The advertising is also less intrusive than other mobile rewards initiatives, he said.
    “It's not in the user's face. You get rewarded for the places you can go,” he said. “When I check in with
  • Best Buy is rolling out an in-store mobile couponing system in conjunction with a startup called shopkick. The system will be in place in 187 stores by tomorrow and 257 stores by October 1.
    Earlier this month, we got a preview of how the system works (see video below). Instead of checking in, as you would with a geo app like Foursquare or Gowalla, shopkick automatically recognizes when someone with the shopkick app on their phone walks into a store. As MG wrote at the time:
    The minute you enter a Best Buy location, your phone recognizes it and you get points and a message that there are deals available at this location. You can also use it to scan items and get more points and other potential deals.
    Unlike other location-based apps, this doesn’t use GPS (or even WiFi triangulation), instead this is a custom hardware plus app system shopkick created and installs in partner stores. This means no more fake check-ins and it allows the app to do some other potentially interesting things
    The shopkick app also lets you scan items with your phone to get deals, and as you earn points, or “kickbucks,” you can redeem them in a variety of ways, including discounts at the store, Facebook credits, or song downloads from Napster.
  • Foursquare has become a popular mobile social networking app with some shopping perks. But another iPhone app, launching today, is much more focused on shopping, and has the combination of early deals, big-name backers, and buzz that makes it worth watching.
    Shopkick, a San Francisco-based startup, launches its flagship iPhone app today, and it's right at the interesting junction of mobile apps, location-based services, and commerce. Someone is going to make money here someday, and Shopkick is one of the most ambitious, interesting attempts we've seen. (Click here to get the app in iTunes.)
    The idea is that when you walk into a store that Shopkick partners with, you start to earn rewards -- "Kickbucks" -- just for walking in. (There's actually a device in the store that connects to your phone.) Its early partners include nationwide chains like Best Buy, American Eagle Outfitters, Macy's, and the Sports Authority, as well as shopping-mall outfit Simon Property Group.
    Once you're inside the store, you can earn more Kickbucks for scanning in barcodes of products with your phone, and you can browse special offers. Kickbucks, in turn, can be redeemed for Facebook credits to play games online, song downloads, in-store gift cards, and other standard online rewards club stuff like magazine subscriptions or donations to charities.
    Shopkick founder and CEO Cyriac Roeding
    So basically Kickbucks is creating a rewards system; a portfolio of your shopping habits and the merchandise you find interesting enough to scan -- so it can potentially target you better with deals; and a virtual currency that can be redeemed for goods in the future. Will it take off?
    We're not sure how the rewards structure will look, which could play a big role. If it's a ripoff -- lots of activity required for lame rewards, it will get boring really quickly. But if it's actually a deal, then we could totally see teenagers or even adults tagging their way through stores by zapping barcodes with their iPhone cameras. (Shopkick would be smart to give people more incentives to tagging products, such as perhaps some sort of neat interactive diary of all the products you've tagged so far.)
    Shopkick CEO Cyriac Roeding has several good things going for him: A great roster of early partners, who will need to push the app hard to get adoption, but could be rewarded with all the extra data; good buzz; and top-rate backers, including Kleiner Perkins' iFund, Greylock Partners, and LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman.
    This should make Foursquare -- which is hoping to capitalize on relationships with merchants -- nervous. So we're eager to see how this one turns out.
    Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/shopkick-iphone-app-2010-8#ixzz148iQ01R1
  • At yesterdays Augmented Planet event in London, the guys from Holition demo’ed their excellent augmented reality marketing campaign that enables you to try on watches and jewellery before you buy. The campaign is running live in Selfridges on Oxford Street where they have placed hi-tech touch screens and staff are handing out wristbands with markers to passers by.
    Users who take part are able to try on the range of Tissot watches by holding up their wrist to the camera and seeing the watch appear on their wrist.
    The campaign at Selfridges runs from 13th – 27 May and if I remember correctly, just by taking part you can win a watch.
    The campaign is an excellent use of augmented reality marketing providing an interactive experience to engage with users, its safe to say that the demo had the wow factor yesterday, I highly recommend giving the demo a try and experiencing it for yourself. If you can’t make it down to Oxford Street and you still want to try the demo, just visit www.tissot.ch/reality/ and follow the instructions.
  • You could already find the best sales with the Sales Locator or Local Sale Finder layers, buy things through the eLay Mobile Marketplace layer, or see what people around you bought with the JustBought.it layer. Now you can even walk into the Augmented Reality Hostage shop, and buy street wear from the French brand Hostage Wear. Layar developers take shopping to the next level.
    The Hostage layer is a 3D shop linked to Hostage Wear’s existing e-shop and is a crossover between a real store and a webshop. We talked to the creator Herve Pellarin from hpsc.fr to explain us about this new shopping experience.
    What’s the difference between a webshop and this new virtual shop in Layar? Herve: “The main difference, is the fact that you have to go to a specific location where the virtual shop is located, to see and buy the products (at least in the distance radius of the layer). These shops can exist anywhere, but at the same time are set to specific locations. This new online shopping approach offers many possibilities for creating special events or private sales around the Augmented Reality shop. For example: ‘Meet Hostage Wear Saturday May 29th from 8AM to 8PM on Broadway for a private sale.’ Users and customers will share an AR experience, but also a common happening at the same location.” What inspired you to create a virtual shop in a layer? Herve: “The whole idea is based on a simple question: Why should famous brands be the only one who can open shops in famous avenues of the world? Why could an unknow brand not have its own shop on these same famous avenues? In a layer, any shop can exist at any point, so smaller shops can open their virtual shops in the biggest avenues.”
  • The street-facing side of Tokyo's N Building is covered in QR codes that can be read by your phone for up-to-date information—including Twitter updates from the building's inhabitants as they happen.

    The project is a collaboration between Qosmo and Teradadesign. Any mobile device that can read QR codes can access shop information, but more in-depth content like tweets (located by GPS tagging), coupons, and reservations can be seen through a dedicated iPhone app that's available only by request.
  • Transcript of "Shopping Reinvented: Next Generation Apparel Retailing"

    1. 1. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL SHOPPING REINVENTED NEXT-GENERATION APPAREL RETAILING
    2. 2. WHY “SHOPPING REINVENTED”?
    3. 3. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION 14 BILLION RETAIL SQ FT Source: ICSC.org INTRO
    4. 4. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION 19 BILLION CATALOGS Source: CarbonRally.com INTRO
    5. 5. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION Source: Royal PIngdom 234 MILLION WEB SITES Source: Royal Pingdom INTRO
    6. 6. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION 1.81 TRILLION TEXTS Source: CTIA INTRO
    7. 7. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION 90 TRILLION E-MAILS Source: Royal Pingdom INTRO
    8. 8. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION UNPRECEDENTED (OFTEN UNFILTERED) DATA The Average Consumer is Bombarded with 34GB of Data per Day INTRO
    9. 9. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION THE POINT? ENGAGEMENT IS MANDATORY INTRO
    10. 10. QUICK HITS: INTERESTING ENGAGEMENT TACTICS
    11. 11. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION DVF: HIGH DEFINITION RUNWAYS IN THE STORE QUICK HITS
    12. 12. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONQUICK HITS BURBERRYS: FROM RUNWAY TO ‘ADD TO CART’
    13. 13. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION BARNEYS: 3-D DENIM QUICK HITS
    14. 14. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONQUICK HITS
    15. 15. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION TIMBERLAND: ALL-CHANNEL 3-D QUICK HITS
    16. 16. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION TIMBERLAND: ALL-CHANNEL 3-D QUICK HITS • 3-D Microsite • 3-D Window Displays • Recycled 3-D glasses • Product X-Rays • TV Commercials • “Virtual Forest” on Facebook
    17. 17. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONQUICK HITS APPLE STORES: “TOURIST ATTRACTION” CULTURE
    18. 18. FUNDAMENTAL SHIFTS IN HOW WE ENGAGE SHOPPERS
    19. 19. SHIFT: RELENTLESS ONSLAUGHT OF TRANSFORMATIONAL NEW DEVICES
    20. 20. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONDEVICES
    21. 21. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONDEVICES
    22. 22. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONDEVICES
    23. 23. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONDEVICES
    24. 24. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION FOREVER WIRED, CONSTANTLY CONNECTED DEVICES
    25. 25. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION INTERACTIVE TV: BIG PLAYERS ARE INVESTING DEVICES
    26. 26. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION INTERACTIVE TV: SHOPPING FROM THE SOFA? DEVICES PLAYSTATION STORE
    27. 27. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION NETFLIX INSURANCE POLICY: ALL-CHANNEL INTEGRATION DEVICES
    28. 28. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION ESCALATE ALL-CHANNEL INTEGRATION: CLIENTELING ON THE IPAD DEVICES
    29. 29. SHIFT: THE RISE OF SOCIAL NETWORKING HAS PUT THE CROWD IN CONTROL
    30. 30. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL THE “LIKE BUTTON” IS THE EASY PART SOCIAL
    31. 31. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL FACEBOOK AS A DESTINATION SOCIAL
    32. 32. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL FACEBOOK AS A DESTINATION SOCIAL
    33. 33. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL Crowdsourcing is the act of outsourcing tasks, traditionally performed by an employee or contractor, to a large group of people or community (a crowd), through an open call SOCIAL
    34. 34. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION SHOCKHOUND STORE BUYERS BECOME SELLERS SOCIAL
    35. 35. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
    36. 36. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
    37. 37. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION BUYERS BECOME BUYERS SOCIAL
    38. 38. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION BUYERS BECOME PROMOTERS SOCIAL
    39. 39. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION BUYERS BECOME MERCHANDISERS
    40. 40. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION BUYERS BECOME MERCHANDISERS -6 million unique visitors a month -400,000 likes added daily -30,000 new sets are created daily
    41. 41. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL SOCIAL GAMING: AN UNTAPPED FRONTIER? 60M US Social Gamers 53% Women Virtual goods are a huge part of the experience $200 Annual Spend per Player Source: NPD Group SOCIAL
    42. 42. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION MONETIZING SOCIAL GAMES Whenever a My Town player is near an H&M location, virtual goods from the new Blues collection will appear in the game SOCIAL
    43. 43. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION MONETIZING SOCIAL GAMES Whenever a player is near an H&M location, virtual goods from the new Blues collection will appear in the game Players can review the product details of the items, and if they check in an item, they earn game bonus points SOCIAL
    44. 44. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION MONETIZING SOCIAL GAMES Whenever a player is near an H&M location, virtual goods from the new Blues collection will appear in the game Players can review the product details of the items, and if they check in an item, they earn game bonus points Additionally, players receive discounts and promotions for real goods available in nearby stores , and points for scanning in-store product bar codes. SOCIAL
    45. 45. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION MONETIZING SOCIAL GAMES -10.6M Branded Impressions -700,000 Online Check-ins -350,000 In-store Check-ins SOCIAL
    46. 46. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL RETAIL THERAPY: PRODUCT PLACEMENT IN VIRTUAL SHOPS
    47. 47. SHIFT: LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION
    48. 48. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION LOCATION BASED SERVICES DEFINED LOCATION A location-based service (LBS) is an information or entertainment service that is accessible with mobile devices and takes advantage of the geographical position of the mobile device.
    49. 49. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL 26% 10% 63% Consumers are interested in allowing their phone to automatically share their location in exchange for perks Source: Mobile Marketing Association have used a mobile phone service that automatically determines your location use mobile location services at least once a week of Apple iPhone owners use location services at least once a week GOING LOCAL: CONSUMER ADOPTION DATA Key Research Takeaways Nearly half who noticed any ads while using location-based services took at least some action LOCATION
    50. 50. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL “SHOP ALERT” TEXT MESSAGES LOCATION
    51. 51. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION DISCOUNTS FOR MOBILE CHECK-INS LOCATION
    52. 52. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL MICRO LOCAL INSIDE THE STORE LOCATION
    53. 53. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL SHOPKICK EARLY ADOPTERS TRY VARIED TACTICS • Special offers at Macy’s • Kickbucks for trying featured products at Sports Authority • Kickbucks for learning about products at Best Buy LOCATION
    54. 54. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL ESCALATE POCKET KIOSK ENRICHES STORE SHOPPING LOCATION
    55. 55. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL • More intense, ongoing relationships with prospective shoppers • Engage shoppers before, during and after the sale • Collect a new spectrum of data to further identify shopper behaviors and patterns on the path to purchase • Drive store traffic and incent shoppers to buy more, more often CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT BENEFITS OF L.B.S.
    56. 56. SHIFT: AUGMENTING RETAIL
    57. 57. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION TISSOT: SHOP WATCHES FROM STORE WINDOWS A/R PLAY MOVIE
    58. 58. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION TISSOT: SHOP WATCHES FROM STORE WINDOWS A/R 85% Sales Lift During Two-Week Campaign
    59. 59. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION ADOPTION IS ON THE RISE A/R
    60. 60. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION RETAILERS ARE AUGMENTING A/R
    61. 61. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION CISCO’S NEXT GEN VIRTUAL FITTING ROOM A/R
    62. 62. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL HOSTAGE WEAR: MOBILE (AND LOCAL!) A/R STORES Los Angeles Moscow Paris London Barcelona Tokyo Santa-Clara New York Chicago Beijing Sydney Cape Town Geneva Dubai Seattle Amsterdam Madrid Rome Berlin Marseille
    63. 63. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL • Very high engagement with the brand • Extends reach by bringing unique brand experiences to people who otherwise would not have access • Fun experiences are often “sticky” • Generate and nurture leads CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT BENEFITS OF A/R
    64. 64. INTRO QUICK HITS DEVICES SOCIAL A/R CLOSINGLOCATION N BUILDING: A/R OVER THE TOP (AND SIDE)? A/R
    65. 65. SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS
    66. 66. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES (SO MANY THREATS) Market conditions, technology, connectivity are clearly working together to change consumer expectations and behaviors It’s time to take stock of our strategies and look for ways to evaluate, exploit, and expand the opportunities inherent in today’s rapidly evolving consumer landscape… INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
    67. 67. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL SO MANY OPPORTUNITIES (SO MANY THREATS) Market conditions, technology, connectivity are clearly working together to change consumer expectations and behaviors In short, it’s time to REINVENT SHOPPING INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL
    68. 68. INTRO QUICK HITS A/RDEVICES CLOSINGLOCATIONSOCIAL CLOSING GETTING STARTED 1. Assign an owner (with executive sponsorship) 2. Understand your customers’ (current or targeted) affinity for/adoption of technology, social networks, etc. 3. Evaluate your commerce platform and your ability to extend and adopt to new devices, platforms, networks 4. Measure your organization’s tolerance for trial (and error)
    69. 69. Blue Martini e-Commerce Blue Martini Contact Center Blue Martini Order Management Warehouses Suppliers & 3PL Stores Partners and Affiliates Integrated Systems/Services Call Center m-Commerce Pocket Kiosk Social Shopping Tweet Desk Store Kiosk Digital Signage Clienteling Store PortalBrand_A.com Brand_B.com B2B.com Customer Catalog & Content Pricing & Promotions Orders Inventory Escalate All-Channel Commerce • Payment Processing • Tax • Address Validation • Fraud Check • WMS • Merchandising Gift Registry
    70. 70. THANK YOU

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