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Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure
 

Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure

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  • Introduction
  • Highlights TechTonic is a play on the original term tectonic, from tectonic plates. It is a term being coined by some analysts, to refer to the all too slow moving shifts in IT architecture, that are needed for IT to evolve. We are going to walk thru 4 major architectural shifts in IT, from mainframe, to today’s darling child … “cloud” computing. We put quotes around the term “cloud” for a reason. “Cloud” is a very vague, over-used term in our industry. It is often referred to as a “marketing” term. However, the benefits of “cloud” computing – the idea of elastic capacity, frictionless deployment, pay-as-you-go/need, invisible infrastructure, etc., are all real and achievable – through virtualization. So our goal with this slide is to talk about a virtualization strategy as being the right path to enable “cloud” computing, whether that be internally achieved, or through a combination of internal and external resources. Note, this is simply a set-up slide. Do not spend much time on it. Most people will get, and agree, with the general progression of IT architectural approaches. Script In our short history of IT, we have seen many changes in architectural approaches, starting from the mainframe. Although there were some substantial benefits to mainframe computing, the downside was also large, especially when we think about cost structures. Hit ENTER for Build From there we went to Client/Server, and we all know the pitfalls of that architectural approach. We’re still digging ourselves out of the complexity created by this environment. Hit ENTER for Build The web approach gave us hope. The idea of centrally managed, updated, and configured applications that were ubiquitously available was promising. But it just didn’t go far enough. And that’s why now… Hit ENTER for Build … everyone wants to talk about “cloud” computing. The idea of an environment that truly is elastic, on-demand, with almost invisible infrastructure, enabling frictionless deployment, and even a only pay for what you need model. Aaaah, nirvana!
  • Existing management is organized in silos. App stacks that are combination of hardware, OS, Middleware, app and the associated processes– DR etc. The tightly coupled stacks each have specific dependencies and often need specific processes and technologies to support them. This is one of the key reasons why 70%+ of the budget is spent on keeping the lights on. In a cloud infrastructure, a clear separation of the production (infrastructure) vs. consumption (applications) layer allows us to create a dynamic environment where change *can* be constant. A consistent infrastructure platform allows for standardized, automated processes, with resources consumped on demand. If you want to take advantage of the cloud, need to have a clear separation of the production layer vs the consumption layer. In the cloud, the consumer (the business) has no idea – and importantly, little interest in or concern with – what hardware platform and management tools are being used to deliver services. It’s about simplicity.
  • Virtualization allows us to turn management on its side. The old walls between different layers begin to come down and application lifecycles can be managed independently of the underlying infrastructure. Many of you have already started by integrating server, storage and virtualization management. This is incredibly important as a fundamental building block for a more dynamic, flexible infrastructure. The business (the applications) should not be bound or slowed down by the infrastructure. Rather, we should be able to deliver the right amount of capacity and performance based on service-level policies. Infrastructure operations itself becomes a much more automated process with far fewer manual processes.
  • By creating a standardized, independent compute platform, virtualization enables management and operational efficiency in three ways: - Saves time and automate day-to-day tasks and processes with zero-touch provisioning, automated orchestration, and focused monitoring and health management (focused on the “compute factory” itself). - Reduces risk and streamlines problem management with performance monitoring and change management to help reduce the issues arising from performance bottlenecks or configuration changes, and availability and business continuity. - Optimizes the IT infrastructure with dynamic allocation of resources, and intelligent capacity management that lets us stay ahead of the demand and recover unused resources.
  • The journey towards cloud computing, in part driven by a shift in how the datacenter is managed, can lead to a new business model for IT where we can leverage the same economics of a dynamic, scalable infrastructure with the control that the business demands – starting with what we have. So all of this sounds great, but how do we even get started? Let’s talk about some of the things you can do with VMware.
  • Let’s start by looking at automating some of the key operational tasks in a virtual environment. How can we take advantage of virtualization to drive management efficiencies? There are several things we can do to streamline and simplify tasks like converting and provisioning VMs: Leverage existing information to quickly assess, size and convert VMs. With the right information at our fingertips, we can make quick work of converting physical servers to VM. Document complex tasks and make them repeatable. Tasks like provisioning or patching are often complex, multi-step processes. Because vSphere is a standard platform, we can more easily make tasks repeatable – and be certain they will work as expected, every time. Use standardization to prepare, validate and deploy VMs rapidly. Again, we can take advantage of the standardized platform to create templates and quickly deploy based on that. Products/features related to this area: Converter, Capacity Planner, Guided Consolidation Host Profiles, Orchestrator, Lab Manager vCenter Server, VI Toolkit, Change Insight
  • VMware has a set of management solutions designed to help you automate tasks – everything from the core management server you know to free scripting tools to help you automate the mundane tasks. The foundation of the vCenter family of management products is the VMware vCenter Management Platform (formerly known as vCenter). This proven management platform is purpose-built to manage virtual datacenters in that it is: Aware that resources are inherently shared. Aware of the mobility of applications within and across locations. Aware of the service level contracts between apps and the infrastructure. VMware vCenter Server is the universal hub for virtualization management. It provides centralized, unified management of all the hosts and VMs in your datacenter from a single point. It provides a common framework for managing what are normally silo’d server, networking, and storage resources. It allows for rapid provisioning and detailed monitoring of the environment. It also includes a GUI-based Orchestration tool – vCenter Orchestrator.
  • VMware vCenter Orchestrator is an automation orchestration tool that enables you to put together, via an easy drag & drop interface, automated workflows of tasks and processes specific to your needs and environment. All the ~800 operations in vSphere environments are represented as workflow elements and through simple drag & drop you can create automated workflows and orchestration of execution sequence across many different elements. For example, one advanced VMO user created a workflow that enabled datacenter migration in the click of one button. This was a workflow that performed a number of VC operations on each VM in a cluster, including a VMotion, until the entire set of VMs had been migrated to a cluster in another datacenter. vCenter Orchestrator will ship with at least 3 canned workflows (10-15 more are in the pipeline): Workflow to snapshot all VMs in a DRS cluster – which is typically executed prior to patching VMs Workflow to rescan the HBAs on all hosts when a LUN is added Send email to admin when a VM is powered on
  • We can also take advantage of virtualization to help reduce operational risks and streamline problem management. This is particularly critical for production applications as we virtualize more and more of them. By automating operational functions like performance and change monitoring or continuity management, we can significantly reduce the risk of problems or outages by: Monitoring, interrogating and understanding the environment with automated tools and standard processes/rules Validating configurations, addressing problems proactively and remediating them Planning comprehensive continuity, protecting critical components and meeting RTOs Related products/features: vCenter Server, AppSpeed, Change Insight Update Manager, Host Profiles HA/FT, vMotion, Data Recovery, Heartbeat, SRM
  • One of the challenges with managing virtualized applications is persuading the application owners that virtualization will work for them. Application owners are concerned that applications won’t perform as expected in a virtual environment and are reluctant to move critical applications to what they perceive as a new platform. Performance, visibility, availability and support are all key issues.
  • In most customer environments, early virtualization deployments often focus on virtualization “candidates” that are considered lower risk – perhaps file and print servers or applications that are not considered mission critical. As customers seek to expand the virtualization footprint, by definition they want to virtualize business-critical apps – and vCenter AppSpeed is an excellent tool to help them achieve that with confidence. There are two main use cases for AppSpeed: 1. Guarantee application SLA for virtualized multi-tier apps 2. Perform an “Assured Migration” Guarantee application SLA AppSpeed allows you to continually monitor the performance of an application ensuring SLAs are met. The product automatically discovers and maps applications and components all the way down to specific database tables…even if the database or any app tier is still on a physical system. The product will then monitor real-time user end user experience for all transactions – breaking down performance into its component parts (e.g. network, application and database latency). Any time an application does not meet its assigned threshold, the user is alerted, and can quickly analyze the root cause of the problem. Users can quickly identify and dive into the application’s dependencies to pin-point the source of the problem. Perform “Assured Migration” One of the top inhibitors to Virtualizing applications is the concern expressed by app owners that applications may not perform as well in virtualized environments. The answer is to measure performance on the physical app pre virtualization, and again after it has been virtualized. In both use cases, AppSpeed, provides a shared view of the application that be understood by both IT and application owners, engendering better communication about application performance overall, and reducing finger pointing and enable faster troubleshooting and resolution if and when trouble arises. In short, With vCenter AppSpeed, customers can be sure that their business critical applications will run as well or better in virtual mode.
  • AppSpeed is an elegant solution. It works by deploying a VM on to each host that you want to monitor. The VM is a virtual appliance, so it can be configured and deployed with minimal effort. It will quickly begin listening to the vSwitch traffic on each host and will begin to interpret and categorize the traffic. Within 15 minutes or so, you can often begin to see results. It can monitor most multi-tier applications, including database traffic (MS SQL, mySQL, Oracle), any HTTP or HTTPS traffic (most application servers and web servers) and MS Exchange Server traffic. It does this without installing an agent, requiring login credentials to the applications or generating synthetic transactions.
  • AppSpeed works by: -Automatically mapping interdependencies. Based on the virtual switch traffic, it can quickly see where application components are running and understand interdependencies. Continually monitoring the environment – looking at transaction latency – to identify when applications are performing below baseline. Allowing you to drill down all the way to the individual transaction, which helps you quickly isolate and remediate problems. Is it an overtaxed VM or a poorly written database query causing problems? AppSpeed helps you get to the bottom of a problem quickly.
  • Understanding and managing performance is critical to operational effectiveness in the datacenter. Another challenge in a virtual datacenter is tracking changes and assessing their business impact. Virtualization lets us consolidate and leverage a standardized platform. These benefits also mean a single host, datastore, vSwitch or other component may have dozens of VMs relying on it. Understanding these relationships can help us both troubleshoot change-related problems and plan effectively to reduce the risk of changes – in an environment where change is frequent and expected. Lastly, a deep understanding of the environment can help us assure configuration integrity and manage against policies. If we can automatically track down inconsistencies – for example, are any VMs in a DRS cluster not vMotion ready? – we can find problems before they find us.
  • Comprehensive data w/ a ‘place value’: vCenter, Update Manager, CIM, Historical Organize, Sculpt, Share: Search, Bookmark, Tag, Report, ‘My Dashboards’ Intelligent configuration analysis: Configuration drift, diff, timeline, relationship analysis, mass check for mis-configuration Configuration integrity via policies: Automated assessment against canned BP policies, custom notification policies
  • vCenter Change Insight can be integrated with vCenter Orchestrator to create workflows that can both check for and remediate common problems.
  • We’ve tackled performance monitoring and change tracking. Capacity bottlenecks can also sneak up on you quickly in a dynamic environment. With a little bit of proactive visibility, we can stay ahead of these types of challenges. vCenter CapacityIQ, one of the vCenter Product Family, can help here – we’ll come back to it in a few minutes.
  • Lastly, virtualization lets us optimize the IT resources in the datacenter, minimizing wasted investment in servers, memory, storage or other components. By proactively allocating and adjusting capacity based on preset rules, capacity can be directed to where it’s needed. Further, intelligent capacity management lets us right-size the environment by both planning ahead for when we’ll need more capacity and identifying and recovering unused resources. Effective reporting – on both capacity and costs – helps us communicate IT’s value and operating excellence to the business. But reporting needs to be in the context of a dynamic infrastructure to be useful. Products/features: vCenter Server, Change Insight, CapacityIQ DRS, Thin Provisioning, DPM, DVS
  • Rule of Thumb Guesstimates Tacit knowledge Given the challenges we talked about – we believe this problem needs a purpose built tool to solve Rules-of-thumb will be simply to unreliable Homegrown spreadsheets and such will not be a practical, long-term solution To re-cap, with Virtualization and Sharing, we have this new paradigm to organize capacity that allows capacity to be optimized for efficiency and predictability Managing capacity in this paradigm requires a new type of management tool … and we’re going to look at the tool we’re building for this purpose Rules of Thumb and Homegrown Solutions overlook many critical considerations for the virtualized environment: Resource dependencies Workload mobility Hypervisor effects Storage optimizations Rule of Thumb are inadequate, because you need to target VM density for different workloads / workload classes These elements make it difficult to do capacity estimates manually. This morning’s snapshot in time may no longer be relevant this afternoon.
  • Last year, we did a number of customer focus groups to discover what areas of management our customers were most interested in us pursuing. Capacity management came out at the top of the list. Now, t he ultimate goal of Capacity Management is to provide the most optimal balance between Business Demands and IT Supply – more simply put, to ensure the right capacity and the right time and that you are equipped with the information you need to make the best decisions for your infrastructure. Being able to do this automatically and systematically, across clusters or the entire datacenter, is exactly what CapacityIQ delivers…along with the CapEx benefits that result from reclaiming resources and deferring new hardware purchases. Capacity Awareness Past / present / future capacity state – datacenter level, cluster level Sufficient capacity to support SLAs Make informed planning, purchasing, and provisioning decisions (73 days left) Capacity Modeling/ Trending What-If scenario modeling Forecast future capacity needs Deliver the right capacity at the right time Capacity Optimization Optimal VM sizing and placement – overprovisioned VMs Reclaim resources from unused VMs Enable capacity to be utilized most efficiently and cost-effectively
  • CapacityIQ can track capacity trending and let you know when it’s time to either buy more servers or recover unused resources. It can also create capacity models that account for future plans. The charts here show the a capacity plan with the introduction of new VMs and new hosts. You can size the VMs based on expected usage, or even base them on existing VMs. CapacityIQ then generates a new model. On the left, the model has two scenarios – one where only the VMs are added (so we’ll hit capacity thresholds even sooner than expected), and another where only the new hosts are added. It might make sense to combine these scenarios, so we’ve done that on the right. Now we have a capacity model where we are adding both the VMs and the hosts at the same time.
  • As you grow your environment to 1000s of VMs, it can become more and more difficult to track whether or not VMs are receiving the proper capacity allocations, especially as the workloads grow and shrink depending on business demand. Example: large financial bank who reclaims idle capacity by manually emailing the VM owners  time-consuming process that doesn’t always yield the desired results. Additional Details: Delta between capacity allocated and workload demand Historical graphs with average and peak utilization values VM right-sizing recommendations (vCPU, memory) “ I need four processors and 8 GB of Memory for my VM” Using workload profiling, we can provide a graph of average/peak utilization over time that demonstrates that VM has historically never been starved for resources. Impact of having Over-Allocated VMs: CPU Overhead VM may not be able to take advantage of vSMP Co-scheduling complications Delivering Timer-Interrupt to unused CPUs causes CPU cycles - ~2-3% Guest-level scheduling overhead Memory Overhead VMware ESX-level memory overhead Memory Ballooning / Swap overhead Impact of having Over-Allocated VMs: Potential capacity bottleneck and impact on the SLA Oftentimes, VMs are deployed for projects and the VM owners forget to notify the VI Admin that the project is over and the VM is no longer needed. However, the VM stays in the environment, eating up valuable capacity. Consistently low resource utilization is a signal that a VM may be a candidate for decommissioning. VMware continuously profiles VMs, identifying VMs that have remained idle over a long period of time, and qualifying it onto a short-list for the VI Admin to investigate whether or not it can be decommissioned. Having VMs configured with virtual CPUs that are not used still imposes resource requirements on the VMware ESX server. CPU Impact Even when unused, virtualization of idle vCPUs requires resources by the kernel. Amount of work needed to support an idle CPU: ~1-2% of a single CPU core Memory Impact Memory is needed to maintain data structures Storage Impact Continues to consume virtual disk space Management Impact Contributes to VMware VirtualCenter clutter
  • As you grow your environment to 1000s of VMs, it can become more and more difficult to track whether or not VMs are receiving the proper capacity allocations, especially as the workloads grow and shrink depending on business demand. Example: large financial bank who reclaims idle capacity by manually emailing the VM owners  time-consuming process that doesn’t always yield the desired results. Additional Details: Delta between capacity allocated and workload demand Historical graphs with average and peak utilization values VM right-sizing recommendations (vCPU, memory) “ I need four processors and 8 GB of Memory for my VM” Using workload profiling, we can provide a graph of average/peak utilization over time that demonstrates that VM has historically never been starved for resources. Impact of having Over-Allocated VMs: CPU Overhead VM may not be able to take advantage of vSMP Co-scheduling complications Delivering Timer-Interrupt to unused CPUs causes CPU cycles - ~2-3% Guest-level scheduling overhead Memory Overhead VMware ESX-level memory overhead Memory Ballooning / Swap overhead Impact of having Over-Allocated VMs: Potential capacity bottleneck and impact on the SLA Oftentimes, VMs are deployed for projects and the VM owners forget to notify the VI Admin that the project is over and the VM is no longer needed. However, the VM stays in the environment, eating up valuable capacity. Consistently low resource utilization is a signal that a VM may be a candidate for decommissioning. VMware continuously profiles VMs, identifying VMs that have remained idle over a long period of time, and qualifying it onto a short-list for the VI Admin to investigate whether or not it can be decommissioned. Having VMs configured with virtual CPUs that are not used still imposes resource requirements on the VMware ESX server. CPU Impact Even when unused, virtualization of idle vCPUs requires resources by the kernel. Amount of work needed to support an idle CPU: ~1-2% of a single CPU core Memory Impact Memory is needed to maintain data structures Storage Impact Continues to consume virtual disk space Management Impact Contributes to VMware VirtualCenter clutter
  • Let’s wrap up by talking about how VMware fits in with what you have in your datacenter today – other management tools.
  • This slide gives a snapshot of how VMware and its partners fit together to provide that full coverage. Vmware solutions are focused primarily on managing our platform while partner solutions generally work across mixed/heterogeneous environments spanning multiple virtualization platforms and physical (x86 and non-x86) environments. This provides end-to-end solutions for provisioning, configuration management, performance and availability, etc. And as I said earlier, the vCenter APIs provide partners with the necessary data and hooks to enable a seamless end-to-end experience. Additionally, VMware offers a plug-in architecture for its vSphere Client – the management console administrators use day-to-day. As that’s become a single pane of glass for the VMware admin, you can pull in management capability for server hardware (ex. HP Insight Manager, IBM Director), storage (ex. EMC ControlCenter) or networking (ex. Cisco) directly in to the vSphere Client. I’ll give a specific example around provisioning to illustrate this….
  • VMware’s solutions can help you in every area – automating day-to-day management tasks, managing and reducing risk and optimizing datacenter resources.

Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure Presentation Transcript

  • Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure David Lefebvre, Sr Systems Engineer VMware
  • Agenda
    • The Promise of the Cloud
    • Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure
      • Automating Key Tasks to Save Time
      • Managing Performance, Changes and Availability to Reduce Risk
      • Effective Capacity and Cost Controls to Right-size the Datacenter
    • Leveraging What You Have
    • Summary
  • Cloud Computing Represents a New Era in IT Mainframe + Centralized mgmt + Secure - Limited access - Inflexible - Costly + Distributed CPU utilization + Added flexibility - Complex / costly to deploy & manage - Not secure - Not efficient Client/Server + Simple to deploy and manage + Broader access + Scale - Limited flexibility - Limited efficiency - Not secure Web + Frictionless deployment + Simplified mgmt thru abstraction + On-demand scale + Unparalleled flexibility + Secure + Highly efficient “ Cloud”
  • Management is Different in the Cloud
      • Traditional Management
      • Static bindings between processes, applications, and infrastructure
      • Change is carefully planned, risky, manual, and slow
      • Heterogeneous elements and processes across silos
      • Management software executes to the lowest common denominator
      • Cloud Management
      • Dynamic relationships across all layers of the technology stack
      • Change is constant and automated
      • Massive standardization and high-level abstraction
      • Day-to-day is automated; Management tools should focus on higher order tasks
    Process A Process B App Stack A App Stack B Compute factory Service catalog Apps vApp vApp vApp Resource Pools vSphere vSphere vSphere vSphere vApp
  • Virtualization Separates Infrastructure and App Management
    • Application lifecycles are managed independently of infrastructure
    • Infrastructure dependencies are replaced by smart infrastructure that translate App SLAs into policies
    • Infrastructure capacity is tiered and managed through a consolidated and strategically planned process
    • Infrastructure operations management is minimized with automated “plug-n-play” rather than ad hoc manual processes, and “replace rather than fix”
    Resource Pools vSphere vSphere vSphere vSphere vApp vApp vApp vApp
  • Automation: A Key Ingredient for the Cloud
    • A ubiquitous, independent compute factory lets us:
      • Save time and automate day-to-day tasks and processes
      • Reduce risk and streamlines problem management
      • Optimize the IT infrastructure
    Resource Pools vSphere vSphere vSphere vSphere
  • Result = New Business Model for Enterprise IT Sounds good, but how do we get there from here? Energize Business Through IT Simplify IT, Lower Costs, Increase Agility
  • Agenda
    • The Promise of the Cloud
    • Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure
      • Automating Key Tasks to Save Time
      • Managing Performance, Changes and Availability to Reduce Risk
      • Effective Capacity and Cost Controls to Right-size the Datacenter
    • Leveraging What You Have
    • Summary
  • Automating Key Tasks: Planning, Orchestration, Provisioning
    • Examples of tasks and processes you can automate to save time:
      • Leverage existing information to quickly assess, size and convert VMs
      • Document complex tasks and make them repeatable with orchestration tools
      • Use standardization to prepare, validate and deploy VMs rapidly
    Resource Pools vSphere vSphere vSphere vSphere
  • VMware vCenter Management Platform: A Unified Control Center
      • Inventory management
      • Automated alarms, alerts
      • Templates/provisioning
      • Including :
        • P2V Conversion
        • Consolidation planning
        • Automated patch management
        • Orchestration tool
      • Foundation for vCenter Product Family
  • Automation with vCenter Orchestrator
      • Workflow engine for orchestrating virtualization
      • Automate manual, repeatable steps by drag and drop interface
      • Centralize workflow management for all processes associated with the environment
      • Administer and control large environments easily
      • Provide custom workflows for complex environments
    vCenter Orchestrator
  • Agenda
    • The Promise of the Cloud
    • Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure
      • Automating Key Tasks to Save Time
      • Managing Performance, Changes and Availability to Reduce Risk
      • Effective Capacity and Cost Controls to Right-size the Datacenter
    • Leveraging What You Have
    • Summary
  • Reduce Risk and Streamline Problem Management
    • Automate performance, change monitoring and continuity to:
      • Assure performance and availability for business-critical applications
      • Prevent problems by interrogating and understanding the environment
      • Monitor, analyze and quickly remediate performance, configuration and capacity issues when they do occur
    Resource Pools vSphere vSphere vSphere vSphere
  • Challenges of Managing Virtualized Applications
    • CIO: “Virtualize more!”
    • “ Our CIO told the team that we need to virtualize as much as we can as soon we can.”
    • VI Admin, VMware Customer
    • App Owners: “No way!”
    • “ The Exchange owner vetoed the virtualization project; he felt it was too risky.”
    • VI Admin, VMware Customer
  • Eliminate Performance Issues With Proactive Monitoring
      • vCenter AppSpeed
      • Monitor application performance against SLAs at the transaction level
      • Root cause analysis and faster troubleshooting
      • Perform “Assured Migrations” where performance is measured both pre and post virtualization of a critical app
  • vCenter AppSpeed Overview
  • Map the Environment, Monitor Performance, Analyze Root Cause Automatically maps interdependencies between application components based virtual switch traffic Continually monitor the environment and identify applications performing below baseline Drill down on performance issues to quickly isolate and remediate problems
  • Reduce Risk With Real-time Insight in to Changes
      • Do I have an accurate, up-to-the-minute view of my environment?
      • What assets support each VM or application?
      • Can I quickly understand dependencies?
      • What changes have been made recently, and should they worry me?
      • Is a recent outage or problem due to a change?
      • Can I make a particular change without affecting service levels?
      • Are any changes affecting my critical production systems?
      • Have any changes or remediation efforts failed?
      • Are my systems configured the way I want them to be?
    Understand dependencies Assess changes Assure integrity Complete | Current | Accurate Relationships | Historical Diff | Drift | Link to business
  • Change Analysis Drives Environmental Integrity
      • Auto-documents environment, all entities, relationships, dependencies
      • Tracks and alerts on configuration and relationship changes real time
      • Assesses configurations against past, peers and best practices
      • Takes corrective actions via policies (e.g. call out to Orchestrator)
    Track, analyze, assess & take corrective actions to maintain configuration integrity
      • Risk mitigation through improved visibility into ripple through effects
      • Improve opex through visibility and streamlined remediation
      • Integrates with existing products and processes
    Benefits Features
  • Integration of vCenter Change Insight and Orchestrator
      • Make custom mass configuration changes/ corrections
      • Mass-configure hosts or VMs for a given configuration change
      • Mass-check for new/changed LUNs across your datacenter, customize
      • Invoke custom workflows by schedule/ change events
      • Select /Create your custom workflows in VCO.
      • With Change Insight, setup policies to invoke these workflows on a selected set of entities, upon a schedule or an event
  • Assure Service Levels by Managing Capacity Proactively Recognize capacity constraints in advance so you can add resources Capacity threshold
  • Agenda
    • The Promise of the Cloud
    • Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure
      • Automating Key Tasks to Save Time
      • Managing Performance, Changes and Availability to Reduce Risk
      • Effective Capacity and Cost Controls to Right-size the Datacenter
    • Leveraging What You Have
    • Summary
  • Optimize IT Resources
    • Optimize the IT infrastructure with:
      • Proactively allocate and adjust capacity as the business needs it
      • Intelligent capacity management to tune and right-size the environment
      • Effective cost and capacity reports that account for a dynamic infrastructure
    Resource Pools vSphere vSphere vSphere vSphere
  • Optimize Resource Usage With VMware vSphere DRS Thin provisioning Distributed Virtual Switch DPM ESX OS APP OS APP OS APP 20GB 40GB 20GB 20GB Thick Thin Thin 40GB 100GB
  • Capacity Management Challenges: Traditional Methods Fall Short
      • Excel spreadsheet
      • SQL / Perl script
      • Time-consuming to build, maintain, prepare and analyze
      • Static snapshot in time
      • Guesstimates
      • Tacit Knowledge
      • Subjective to experiential bias
      • Overly conservative to be safe
    “ It worked for me in the past…” “ To be safe, I’ll add an x% buffer…” Rule of Thumb Homegrown Tool
  • Capacity Management: Improve CapEx by 25%
      • vCenter CapacityIQ
      • Forecast timing of capacity shortfalls and needs
      • Perform “What-If” impact analysis to model effect of capacity changes
      • Identify and reclaim unused capacity
  • Capacity Modeling
      • Multiple Host and VM What-If scenarios can be modeled
      • Virtual Machine Capacity – Trend View displays results
      • Up to five scenarios can be modeled
      • Compare or combine scenario results
  • VM Profiling: Idle and Powered-Off VMs
    • Idle Capacity
      • Idle VMs: VM has consistently low resource utilization over a long period of time
      • Powered-Off VMs: VM has been powered off over a long period of time
    Zzz...
  • VM Profiling: Oversized and Undersized VMs
    • VM Sizing Opportunities
      • Oversized VMs: VM has been allocated more capacity than it needs
      • Undersized VMs: VM needs more capacity than it has been allocated
    Demand Capacity
  • Agenda
    • The Promise of the Cloud
    • Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure
      • Automating Key Tasks to Save Time
      • Managing Performance, Changes and Availability to Reduce Risk
      • Effective Capacity and Cost Controls to Right-size the Datacenter
    • Leveraging What You Have
    • Summary
  • VMware vCenter Integrates With What You Have
    • vCenter Extensibility
      • APIs and UI plug-in architecture to enable 3 rd party integration
    Systems Management CMDB NOC Dashboard Service Desk Unix/Linux Management Network Management Storage Management Security Management Compliance Management Datacenter Operations vSphere Client plug-ins for network, server and storage management
  • Configuration Management Example at a Large Telco VMware vSphere Federated CMDB 1) DRS triggers a vMotion 2) Raises an event in vCenter 3) Which is being monitored by the ESM 4) ESM creates an incident in the service desk 5) which updates the CMDB and service map 6) then creates a Change Notification and auto-closes the incident Service Desk App Mapping
  • Agenda
    • The Promise of the Cloud
    • Operating a World-Class Virtual Infrastructure
      • Automating Key Tasks to Save Time
      • Managing Performance, Changes and Availability to Reduce Risk
      • Effective Capacity and Cost Controls to Right-size the Datacenter
    • Leveraging What You Have
    • Summary
  • VMware Management: A Key Ingredient for the Cloud
    • vCenter Server, Host Profiles, vCenter Orchestrator
    • vCenter Guided Consolidation, Capacity Planner
    • vCenter Change Insight
    • vCenter Server, Update Manager, Host Profiles
    • vCenter AppSpeed, Change Insight, CapacityIQ
    • vSphere vMotion, HA, FT, Data Recovery, vCenter SRM, Heartbeat
    • vCenter Server
    • vSphere DRS, DPM, DVS, Thin Provisioning
    • vCenter Change Insight, CapacityIQ
    Resource Pools vSphere vSphere vSphere vSphere