The declaration of independence

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  • Video @ United Streaming
  • HW: Questions & What Drives Me Essay Topic What Drives Me Essay: Brainstorm a list of topics
  • Total Time 40 minutes While listening, stop at the end of each section to discuss/highlight words.
  • The declaration of independence

    1. 1. Revolutionary Literature <ul><li>The founding of a Nation </li></ul><ul><li>1750-1820 </li></ul>
    2. 2. Elements to Think of as You Read <ul><li>The Age of Reason </li></ul><ul><li>Rhetoric </li></ul><ul><li>Allusions to Greek and Roman ideals </li></ul>
    3. 3. The Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson
    4. 4. SESSION 11-SEPTEMBER 8 & 9 <ul><li>Declaration of Independence </li></ul>What do you already know about the Declaration of Independence ? Who? What? Where? When? Why?
    5. 5. #1 SPEAKER #2 INTENDED AUDIENCE #6 MESSAGE #4 TOOLS (LIST WITH EXAMPLES FROM TEXT) #5 TONE (LIST WITH EXPLANATION/#5 TONE (LIST WITH EXPLANATION/EXAMPLE) EXAMPLE) #3 PURPOSE 3 4 5 1 6 2
    6. 6. SESSION 11-SEPTEMBER 8 & 9 <ul><li>Declaration of Independence </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to the Declaration of Independence </li></ul><ul><li>Loaded Language </li></ul><ul><li>The language of the Declaration was carefully chosen. Find examples of words Jefferson uses that are charged with emotion. </li></ul><ul><li>Looking Closely at One Section </li></ul><ul><li>Although this is an incredibly important document, the language is outdated. Your group must take one section and figure out the gist. You will write this as a text message that Jefferson could have sent. Texts are expensive, so you have only 25 “words” to text. </li></ul><ul><li>Preamble </li></ul><ul><li>Declaration of Rights </li></ul><ul><li>Charges Against the King </li></ul><ul><li>Criticism of British People </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Work with your partner to answer the questions. Be prepared to discuss in the full group. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Rhetoric and Style <ul><li>Identify each one of the truths. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify each one of the rights. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the subject and predicate of the first sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the major assumption underlying the first sentence. What is the rhetorical principle at work? </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>What effect does the phrase “self-evident” have in sentence 2? How does that phrase help support the speaker’s position? </li></ul><ul><li>Why does the speaker begin with an appeal to “respect” as a value before stating the claim? </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the speaker’s appeal to ethos, logos, and pathos. Identify and explain two for each. </li></ul><ul><li>Read carefully the second and third “truths.” At that time, was it a historical fact that the governments were instituted for the purpose the speaker states? What is the rhetorical purpose of such a statement? </li></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Explain how the speaker uses facts to appeal to logos. </li></ul><ul><li>Explain the effect of the rhetorical parallelism with which Jefferson concludes the Declaration. </li></ul><ul><li>How does Jefferson explain the reason for a formal declaration of independence? Why do you think it was necessary for Jefferson to state the “causes which impel them to the separation”? </li></ul><ul><li>Is the Declaration of Independence a radical document? Explain. </li></ul>

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