Day 2 us lit

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  • 1. Day 2
    U.S. Literature
  • 2. Socratic Seminar: “The Worn Path”
    1.Here is a quote from a literary anthology: “Authors use setting to create meaning, just as painters use backgrounds and objects to render ideas.” The setting of a story is the environment in which the story is located. This environment can be physical, political, temporal (time of day, time of year, etc.). What are the characteristics of the setting of “A Worn Path”? How does that setting reveal meaning in the story? What is significant about that setting?
    2.In this short story, Phoenix Jackson takes a journey. What is significant about that journey?
    3.Each of you try to relate to this journey. Discuss and be able to tell the class how the journey is significant to YOU, how you can relate the journey that Phoenix Jackson takes to your own life in some way.
  • 3. 4.What elements do we need to know more about Phoenix Jackson? What kind of character does the author want us to see? Name characteristics of Phoenix Jackson, as revealed in the short story, and identify the passages that illustrate those characteristics.
    5.What is a physical description of Phoenix Jackson, referring to passages in the short story?
    6.Contrast Phoenix with the white people in the story. What are the characteristics of the hunter, the nurse? Do the nurse and hunter seem to be more positive or more negative characters than Phoenix Jackson?
    7.What is ironic in the nurse’s calling Phoenix Jackson a “charity” case? (Do you know double meanings of the word “charity”?)
  • 4. 8.What is a.b. c.d.e.the significance of: The scene with the white hunter and Phoenix’s reply to him when the hunter asks Phoenix if she is scared? “’. . . I seen plenty go off closer by, in my day, and for less than what I done,’ she said, holding utterly still.”Phoenix’s stealing the nickel from the hunter (and the hunter’s claiming that he had no money)?
    9. Phoenix’s statement that she “never did go to school,” that she “was too old at the Surrender”?Phoenix Jackson’s name? The title of the story?
    10. Everyone: Eudora Welty has said about her writing: “Greater than scene, I came to see, is situation. Greater than situation is implication. Greater than all of these is a single, entire human being who will never be confined in any frame.” How does each character try to “confine” Phoenix Jackson to a “frame,” and how does Phoenix Jackson escape that “frame”?
  • 5. ANNOTATING TEXT
    TABLE DISCUSSION
    Last night, you read “The Worn Path” to examine annotations. What did you notice? What conclusions did you draw about the frequency? Why might annotating text be useful? What questions do you have about annotating?
    Who?
    What?
    Where?
    When?
    Why?
    Annotations
    Rock!
    Reading is more than just decoding!
  • 6. Annotating Text
    Let’s review the key ideas of annotations.
    There’s no magic number.
    Think quality not just quantity.
    There’s no set place to record your annotations.
    Annotate as you read, referring to your bookmark.
  • 7. Annotating Text
    PRACTICE
    Whole class-”The Hare and the Tortoise”
    Small groups-”The Two Brothers”
  • 8. SESSION 2-AUGUST 12 & 13
    imagery
    irony
    loaded language
    mood
    motivation
    paradox
    parallelism
    point of view
    primary source
    rhetorical questions
    sarcasm
    satire
    stereotype
    speaker
    stream of consciousness
    symbol
    theme
    tone
    understatement
    voice
    Literary Terms Poster
    Must include:
    BE CREATIVE
    anti-hero
    audience
    author’s purpose
    characters
    conflict
    connotation
    dialect
    diction
    farce
    figurative language
    flashback
    foreshadowing
    historical context
    humor
    hyperbole