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Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012
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Ericsson Presentation: City life in the Networked Society - Economist Event Lagos May 2012

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Ericsson's Alan Triggs, Head of Operations for Sub-Saharan Africa presentation at the Economist Event, Lagos May 2012.

Ericsson's Alan Triggs, Head of Operations for Sub-Saharan Africa presentation at the Economist Event, Lagos May 2012.

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  • 2011-10-19
  • 2011-03-30 There are many devices whose utility is enabled by mobile broadband , including mobile phones, personal computers and a growing number of electronic devices and software applications. Wireless connectivity will make broadband mobile and affordable to the majority of people. Particularly in the case of machine-to-machine communications, it will also enable applications for a variety of industries and uses (e.g. smart grids, transportation, financial services and healthcare.) This is far beyond the capability and scope of today’s networks. We envision 50 billion network connections over the next decade, compared with some 5 billion currently. The underlying network technologies must be enhanced to accommodate such a vast number of connections. We expect Ericsson to benefit from this as network operators and service providers: > Accelerate the transition from legacy technologies to IP- based technologies. > Respond to rising demands for services that aid economic, societal and environmental development. > Invest in mobile and fixed broadband access, multi-service edge routing, IP multimedia subsystems ( IMS ) based services and Metro optical and/or radio transport. > Prioritize suppliers that combine technology with services for lower total cost, faster time-to-market and reduced project risks. > Outsource more of their network-related activities and operations for increased flexibility and focus more on the consumer experience. These are all areas where the Company is well positioned and continues to invest heavily.
  • 1800 – 3 cities globally with a population of one million or more 1900 – 16 cities globally with a population of one million or more 1950 – 74 cities 2010 – 442 cities Source: National Geographic, December 2011 Lagos Kinshasa Luanda Abidjan Johannesburg Tshwane Nairobi Cape Town Kano Dar es Salaam Ekurhuleni Durban Dakar Ibadan Accra Doual Abuja Ouagadougou Antananarivo Kumasi
  • In 2008 humanity reached a milestone. For the fist time in history more people are living in cities then elsewhere. In 2050 between 6 and 7 billion people will live in cities. That is 70 percent of the world’s population.
  • Somewhere in the world around 1,900 people move to the city every hour. Citied grow not only thanks to migration into the cities, but natural urban population increase accounts for 50 percent of urban growth and reclassification of rural areas to city areas account for 25 percent of growth. The urban population grow by some 5 million people each month. That is equal to the city of Detroit, St. Petersburg or Riyadh. It is even more than the size of Sydney, Cape Town, Caracas or Berlin.
  • ************************************************ Diversity is on of the key characteristics of a big city, a place where people with different backgrounds come together. (Source: “ Diversity and innovation, A business opportunity for all ”, a publication financed by the European Community Programme for Employment and Social Solidarity (2007-2013): There is a linkage between innovation, higher productivity and increased economic growth. The theoretical, empirical and business evidence for this linkage is well articulated in a large body of literature and in organizational business practice. Furthermore, the linkage between innovation, productivity and increased economic growth, can now be extended to workplace diversity being a key driver in the process. If you bring many different perspectives to a problem, you end up with more creative solutions. Workplace diversity can ensure there is a large pool of knowledge, skills, life experience, perspectives, and expertise. That ’s why diversity powers innovation.
  • What we are seeing in cities and society as a whole today is that a new kind of creativity is taking shape. There is a distinction between the traditional vision of creativity as something resulting from individual genius, and the modern vision of creativity as a social process.[1] This new creativity has its origin in the community, in which everyone is taking part. It will be the mosaic of small ideas that together will form something big. We have already seen examples of this, with Wikipedia perhaps one of the more prominent. Wikipedia already comprises more than18 million articles, and is continuously expanding as more people contribute to it. And as we look to the future we see the potential for a continuous torrent of ideas and creativity. [1]From ‘Creative Cities’ to ‘Urban Creativity’? Space, creativity and governance in the contemporary city, Costa et al
  • SMART Cities and SMART Infrastructure : With the advent of technology and infrastructure development, there will be a shift from “GREEN” to “SMART” concept. Some of the SMART initiatives will find its way into elements of Energy, Technology, Grids, Cars, Buildings, Utilities and Infrastructure. Energy efficiency and zero emissions will be the basic premise of such initiatives. Examples on how green and intelligent technologies will converge: SMART buildings: BIPV ( Building Integrated PhotoVoltaics): A BIPV system consists of integrating photovoltaics modules into the building infrastructure, such as the roof or the façade. By simultaneously serving as building material and power generator, BIPV systems can provide savings in materials and electricity costs, reduce use of fossil fuels and emission of ozone depleting gases. SMART Mobility: Bus rapid transit ( BRT, also known as busway or quality bus ) is a term applied to a variety of public transportation systems using buses to provide faster, more efficient service than an ordinary bus line. Often this is achieved by making improvements to existing infrastructure, vehicles and scheduling. The first BRT system in the world was the "Integrated Transportation Network" implemented in Curitiba, Brazil in 1974. SMART Energy: Energy surplus: Energy generated that is beyond the immediate needs of the producing system. Private/household energy producers (Photo Voltaic, wind power) may re-sell their surplus to their energy company. Storage of surplus energy, e.g. in connected electric vehicles. Source: Frost & Sullivan, ”World‟s Top Global Mega Trends To 2020 and Implications to Business, Society and Cultures” (October 2010)
  • Ericsson has identified a possibility to design and construct a framework for measuring the ICT maturity and the triple bottom line effects/benefits of ICT in major cities globally Through this study Ericsson aims to contribute and inspire to the development of Networked Societies around the world The result of the Networked Society City Index study show there is a strong, almost linear, correlation between ICT maturity in cities and their triple bottom line development. The potential leverage from ICT investments is linear and does not decline with increased ICT maturity. This implies that even the most developed cities in terms of ICT maturity would benefit from continued investments in ICT.
  • Transcript

    • 1. City Life in TheNetworked SocietyAlan TriggsHead of OperationsEricsson sub-Saharan Africa
    • 2. On the Brink of the networkedsociety Billion THINGS 50 B 50 5 PEOPLE 5.0 B 1 PLACES ~0.5 B 1875 1900 1925 1950 1975 2000 2025Future Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 2
    • 3. The world is going urban 1900 16 cities of one million or more 2010 442 cities (illustration, no exact position or number of cities) Source: National Geographic, December 2011Future Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 3
    • 4. Urbanization explosion Billions 7 ”Our future 6 existence as a species is, 5 inevitably, an urban one” 4 World Policy Journal 3 2 URBAN 1 POPULATION RURAL POPULATION 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050Source: United Nations, Department of Economicand Social Affairs, Population DivisionFuture Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 4
    • 5. ..And Growth is accelerating7,500 70% 2%People per hour in cities by 2050 of the earth’s surface80% 75%of CO2 emissions of energy consumptionFuture Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 5
    • 6. Diversity powers innovation Innovation Productivity Economic growthFuture Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 6
    • 7. Connectivity drives a New kind ofcreativity Old NeW By and for the few By and for all The genius The community The masterpiece The mosaic of small ideas The pen & pencil The computer & mobile & pen & pencil The given moment The continuous torrent The studio & the lab Anywhere The monologue The dialogueFuture Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 7
    • 8. Innovations move From ”green” to”smart” › Green and Intelligent technologies will converge Smart is not only about Smart Energy adding technology, but about utilizing technology to Smart Buildings achieve a sustainable future Smart MobilityFuture Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 8
    • 9. Bringing Social, Economic & Environmental benefits 100 high Networked Society 90 City Index SingaporeTriple bottom 80line leverage Seoul Stockholm “1000 70 from ICT Tokyo Shanghai London New York additional 60 Paris broadband medium Social, Los Angeles Sydney Economic &Environmental 50 São Paulo Beijing users = benefits 40 Mexico City Jakarta Buenos Aires Istanbul Moscow approx 80 30 Manila Cairo new jobs created” Johannesburg Mumbai Delhi 20 Lagos Dacca Karachi 10 low medium high 0 Source = Ericsson, 2011, 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Networked Society City Index (report), ICT Maturity Future Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 9
    • 10. Networked SocietyAN African Perspective 2009 Future Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 10 Source: http://manypossibilities.net/african-undersea-cables
    • 11. Networked SocietyAN African Perspective 2009 ..2010 Future Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 11 Source: http://manypossibilities.net/african-undersea-cables
    • 12. Networked SocietyAN African Perspective 2009 ..2010. . 2 0 12 ! Future Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 12 Source: http://manypossibilities.net/african-undersea-cables
    • 13. Cities transformed In the NetworkedSociety Connectivity Smart Citiesto drive the Innovation to meet your ChallengesFuture Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 13
    • 14. VisionIn the networked society people, knowledge,devices, and information are networked forthe growth of society, life and business. Thank YouFuture Cities – Lagos 2012 | Public | © Ericsson AB 2012 | 2012-05-31 | Page 14

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