The Connected Megacity

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The Connected Megacity

  1. 1. The ConnectedMegacityMobile World Congress 2013
  2. 2. THE MEGA-URBANIZATION› Urbanization trends – In the year of 2050 it is estimated that 70 percent of the world’s population will live in cities – The highest growth will be noticed in Asia and Africa – A high birthrate combined with an increasing migration from the rural areas lead to the very dynamic growth process› Socioeconomic drivers – Push factors include unemployment, poor housing and infrastructure, lack of educational facilities, etc. – Pull factors include economical opportunities, attractive jobs, better education, modern lifestyle, etc. – Cities are engines of economic productivity and creativity as they bring tools and people together Mobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 2 *Photos licensed under Creative Commons
  3. 3. MEGACITIES (and almost megacities) 2025 DELHI 33 MILLIONS TOKYO 39 MILLIONS SHANGHAI 28 MILLIONS MEXICO CITY MUMBAI 26 MILLIONS 27 MILLIONSMobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 3
  4. 4. DIVERSITY OF CHALLENGES URBAN PLANNING JOBS TRANSPORTATION ENERGY WASTE EDUCATION PUBLIC SAFETY POLLUTION HEALTH WATER FOOD AND AGRICULTURE GREEN ASPECTS FOOD AND AGRICULTURE URBAN DIVIDESMobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 4 *Photos licensed under Creative Commons
  5. 5. IDEAS FOR IMPROVEDGOVERNANCE COMPETITIVENESS ENVIRONMENT BEHAVIORAL CHANGE ICT OPPORTUNITIES QUALITY OF LIFE SUSTAINABILITY CITIZEN DIALOGUEFinding a balanced Awareness, understanding,view on city growth and collaborationMobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 5 Photos licensed under Creative Commons
  6. 6. COMMON ICT THEMES› The governance perspective – Managing infrastructure and resources efficiently – Real-time monitoring and analytics tools for dynamic short-term action as well as holistic long-term planning – Improved public administration with increased transparency and efficiency through› The citizen perspective – Awareness of decisions and what type of behavior that the city and the citizens benefits from – Personal and contextual incentives for sustainable behavioral change – Driving collaboration and the ability to affect the city surroundings through collective action Photos licensed under Creative CommonsMobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 6
  7. 7. COMMON ICT THEMES› The technology perspective – Bridging components supporting the understanding of processes in other sectors to reach synergy effects – Services having the support from the knowledge and reasoning of an intelligent system – Importance of data visualizations that help create awareness about, for example, sustainability issues› The business perspective – Augmenting traditional products with ICT features and services that differentiate and enhance their usage – Enabling radically new solutions to city challenges by building on the creativity of people and businesses – Understanding how shifts from physical goods to the service sector can amplify the environmental benefits of e-servicesMobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 7
  8. 8. Sustainable city modelsCommunity and business Long-term vision alignment, evaluations,participation proactive measures, transformations, collaboration, regulations Dynamic city operations centersCitizen contributions, incentives and Optimization, resource management,rewards, responsibility, good practices, infrastructure, public services, objects,services, business innovation sensors, actuators Crowdsourcing Update and service data reasoning Respond Event algorithms to events information Knowledge and reasoning layer Update Contextual and preferences Status personal info Shared data information Public safety Education Health Jobs Food Energy Water Mobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 8
  9. 9. Threeuse casesMobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 9
  10. 10. Resilient CityFrom Data via learning to decision Reinforcement data learning knowledge reason decision Gather data from Learning Knowledge Reasoning representation Decide & Act devices & systems • Machine Learning • Logic reasoning • Find best action • Traffic characteristics • Data Mining • Learned knowledge • Probabilistic reasoning sequence • Mobile networks • Structure Learning • Expert knowledge • Hybrid reasoning • Decision support • Base stations • Parameter Learning • Logic and probabilistic • Markov logic • Rule generation and • Cell phones • Case based learning knowledge • MEBN suggestions • Logs • Semantic models • Complex event • Explanation of decisions • Transformation processing • Monitoring of results to • Verification improve future decisions • Simulation UI, API & SDK ›It shows how the city can respond to an unexpected event in a resilient way. It also suggests how a sophisticated reasoning around the characteristics of the event can provide knowledge to the city services about the best way of responding to it. And how available resources (public services, people, sensors, devices, etc.) can be used in an effective way to understand and mitigate the situation; something that require interoperability and cross-domain communication.Mobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 10
  11. 11. Proactive City› It is easy to imagine how sensors feed data into a city operations center, and how that data is analyzed and used to optimize different public services.› However, another interesting question is how all the gathered city data can be used by the inhabitants, and how the data can be presented in different contexts to create awareness and understanding.› Something that possibly triggers a more sustainable behavior.› This is of course done through a combination of technical enablers, to name a few: – Understanding data – Decision Support – Human Mobility Analytics – Mode of Transport – Context-aware ITS – Ericsson AppsMobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 11
  12. 12. Greener City› Cellular communications are only one part of the puzzle and the smart grid communication architecture will be made of up many technologies› There is no silver bullet, no one technology› Cellular and in particular LTE is ideally placed for last-mile connectivity in the field area network› Experience from our Utility customers shows that the key use-cases are – advanced metering – grid monitoring and control – field workforce – distributed energy and - with a longer lead time - electric vehicles.› It is equally important to understand network optimization for these particular applications and this is where the features of LTE play an important role, namely – low latency – QoS – high throughputMobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 12
  13. 13. Mobile World Congress 2013 | © Ericsson AB 2013 | 2013-02-25 | Page 13

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