Barcelona declaration of measurement principles final with results voting. 20.06.10

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Barcelona declaration of measurement principles final with results voting. 20.06.10

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  • BACKGROUND NOTES FROM JANUARY 21 MEETING:           AVEs a.         Demand had risen over last 18 months, especially from US clients—it is a cultural difference; US media environment is more homogeneous than Europe (Report Intl) b.        Global measurement requires consistency c.         Need for AVEs is more persistent from agency side than corporate comms (Cision) d.        Not a core metric, should still emphasize the need to be outcome focused e.        “Raise the Floor”—it’s about improving one of the worst metrics (Cision) f.          Clients are buying this metric b/c it’s ‘close to free,’ yet it winds up as a major standalone metric g.         Must alter the language—cost vs. value h.        At what professional level do you educate people about the change in metric? (Hill & Knowlton) i.          Need to offer clients a range of options (esp. since Weighted Media Cost is more expensive than AVE) Agreed Upon— 1.        This topic is germane to AMEC, and we should therefore add it to AMEC’s agenda in Barcelona for consideration of adopting the Weighted Media Cost metric/language/practice. 2.        Outcome based metrics—attributes, behavior, business results that target an audience—should always be used in preference to any output metric, including Weighted Media cost, whenever possible. 3.        When measures are based on the cost of media space/time, they should be referred to as “costs,” not as “values.” 4.        If costs are used, they should be adjusted for quality (particularly for tone with negative stories portrayed by negative costs) and for the actual space/time occupied by a client or competitors. 5.        Multipliers should not be used unless proven by survey work or marketing mix models. 6.        Negotiated rates should be used in preference to rate cards. 7.        Must be based on methodological transparency.
  • BACKGROUND NOTES FROM JANUARY 21 MEETING:           II.                     Social Media Measurement a.         Lack of common language and way to translate ‘social media’ into ‘traditional.’ For example, “engagement” is defined in many different ways by different vendors. b.        Need to figure out who ‘owns’ digital measurement (if we don’t step up to quantify the investment, then someone else is going to do it for us) c.         What are the components that go into gauging a brand’s online presence? d.        Look at quality and quantity in tandem e.        Create a ‘wik-tionary’ (ongoing wiki of social media measurement terms that can be updated and viewed by anyone) f.          Social media measurement Is a process/methodology, not a set of tools g.         How much sampling is needed since no one knows what 100% of the data set would be? h.        Tap into AMEC’s members for data collection BACKGROUND NOTES FROM APRIL 29 MEETING: Social Media Measurement : (ask Tim to send full list) Social media *can* be measured Social media measurement is a discipline and process, not a tool There is no "single metric“ for social media Media content analysis has a fundamental role in SM measurement – but should be supplemented by web Analytics, search analytics, survey data and (where possible) sales and CRM data Need clearly defined goals and outcomes for social media (refer to PRSA document and new Altimeter report) Evaluating quality *and* quantity is critical, just as with conventional media Given the scale and volume of SM, technology-assisted analysis is important – but human reading and coding is still valuable for precision analysis (can’t expect 100% accuracy from technology solution; importance of sampling/reading from targeted lists) Measurement must adapt to the media being measured – in most social media, the focus is "conversation" and "communities" not "coverage" Understanding reach and influence is important, but existing sources are not accessible, transparent or consistent enough to be reliable or recommended [need to look at: original content; who passes along and replies to original content; full reach/readers] Experimentation and testing is critical to success -- though measurement and communication fundamentals still apply **Mike Daniels feedback: focus on community (measurement must be community focused; tracking conversation/comments is important); is it possible to normalize social and traditional media? Should clients be encouraged to integrate the two?
  • BACKGROUND NOTES FROM JANUARY 21 MEETING:           II.                     Social Media Measurement a.         Lack of common language and way to translate ‘social media’ into ‘traditional.’ For example, “engagement” is defined in many different ways by different vendors. b.        Need to figure out who ‘owns’ digital measurement (if we don’t step up to quantify the investment, then someone else is going to do it for us) c.         What are the components that go into gauging a brand’s online presence? d.        Look at quality and quantity in tandem e.        Create a ‘wik-tionary’ (ongoing wiki of social media measurement terms that can be updated and viewed by anyone) f.          Social media measurement Is a process/methodology, not a set of tools g.         How much sampling is needed since no one knows what 100% of the data set would be? h.        Tap into AMEC’s members for data collection BACKGROUND NOTES FROM APRIL 29 MEETING: Social Media Measurement : (ask Tim to send full list) Social media *can* be measured Social media measurement is a discipline and process, not a tool There is no "single metric“ for social media Media content analysis has a fundamental role in SM measurement – but should be supplemented by web Analytics, search analytics, survey data and (where possible) sales and CRM data Need clearly defined goals and outcomes for social media (refer to PRSA document and new Altimeter report) Evaluating quality *and* quantity is critical, just as with conventional media Given the scale and volume of SM, technology-assisted analysis is important – but human reading and coding is still valuable for precision analysis (can’t expect 100% accuracy from technology solution; importance of sampling/reading from targeted lists) Measurement must adapt to the media being measured – in most social media, the focus is "conversation" and "communities" not "coverage" Understanding reach and influence is important, but existing sources are not accessible, transparent or consistent enough to be reliable or recommended [need to look at: original content; who passes along and replies to original content; full reach/readers] Experimentation and testing is critical to success -- though measurement and communication fundamentals still apply **Mike Daniels feedback: focus on community (measurement must be community focused; tracking conversation/comments is important); is it possible to normalize social and traditional media? Should clients be encouraged to integrate the two?
  • BACKGROUND NOTES FROM JANUARY 21 MEETING:      III.                   Market Mix Modeling a.         Vendor neutral, cost effective standard that is part of larger marketing mix b.        Goal is to find out what drove incremental sales c.         What are the PR inputs/variables that are tied to market mix models? Agreed Upon— 1.        Share individual knowledge w/ Lou Capozzi and his students 2.        Define right variables for integrated platform BACKGROUND NOTES FROM APRIL 29 MEETING: Market Mix Modeling / NYU Report: agreed upon the following slide— Clients are creating demand for MMM for consumer marketing We need to understand the value and implications of MMM for accurate evaluation of consumer marketing PR in contrast to other approaches We need to develop PR measures that can provide reliable input into MMM. Exploration of such measures might focus on quantity and quality measures, traditional media versus social media, and consistency with other marketing disciplines
  • BACKGROUND NOTES FROM JANUARY 21 MEETING:           II.                     Social Media Measurement a.         Lack of common language and way to translate ‘social media’ into ‘traditional.’ For example, “engagement” is defined in many different ways by different vendors. b.        Need to figure out who ‘owns’ digital measurement (if we don’t step up to quantify the investment, then someone else is going to do it for us) c.         What are the components that go into gauging a brand’s online presence? d.        Look at quality and quantity in tandem e.        Create a ‘wik-tionary’ (ongoing wiki of social media measurement terms that can be updated and viewed by anyone) f.          Social media measurement Is a process/methodology, not a set of tools g.         How much sampling is needed since no one knows what 100% of the data set would be? h.        Tap into AMEC’s members for data collection BACKGROUND NOTES FROM APRIL 29 MEETING: Social Media Measurement : (ask Tim to send full list) Social media *can* be measured Social media measurement is a discipline and process, not a tool There is no "single metric“ for social media Media content analysis has a fundamental role in SM measurement – but should be supplemented by web Analytics, search analytics, survey data and (where possible) sales and CRM data Need clearly defined goals and outcomes for social media (refer to PRSA document and new Altimeter report) Evaluating quality *and* quantity is critical, just as with conventional media Given the scale and volume of SM, technology-assisted analysis is important – but human reading and coding is still valuable for precision analysis (can’t expect 100% accuracy from technology solution; importance of sampling/reading from targeted lists) Measurement must adapt to the media being measured – in most social media, the focus is "conversation" and "communities" not "coverage" Understanding reach and influence is important, but existing sources are not accessible, transparent or consistent enough to be reliable or recommended [need to look at: original content; who passes along and replies to original content; full reach/readers] Experimentation and testing is critical to success -- though measurement and communication fundamentals still apply **Mike Daniels feedback: focus on community (measurement must be community focused; tracking conversation/comments is important); is it possible to normalize social and traditional media? Should clients be encouraged to integrate the two?
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  • Barcelona declaration of measurement principles final with results voting. 20.06.10

    1. 2. <ul><li>Barry Leggetter </li></ul><ul><li>Executive Director AMEC </li></ul><ul><li>Summit Director </li></ul>
    2. 3. <ul><li>Creating the Barcelona Declaration of Measurement Principles </li></ul><ul><li>Moderator </li></ul><ul><li>David B. Rockland Partner/CEO Ketchum Pleon </li></ul>
    3. 4. Barcelona Declaration of Measurement Principles Global Alliance ICCO Institute for Public Relations Public Relations Society of America AMEC U.S. & Agency Leaders Chapter
    4. 5. Why Are We Here? For the Common Good of Our Industry. <ul><li>The communications landscape is changing rapidly </li></ul><ul><li>A lack of clear standards and approaches to PR measurement results in the profession not always being taken seriously; it doesn’t count unless you can count it </li></ul><ul><li>AVEs, random use of multipliers, and other silly metrics and practices diminish the integrity of the profession and the market size </li></ul><ul><li>As a profession, we spend more time arguing amongst ourselves rather than building the field </li></ul><ul><li>We are at a moment in time to make difference, and alter the path we are on, taking advantage of the opportunity to “own” the new communications environment </li></ul>
    5. 6. New AMEC research shows strong demand for AVEs <ul><li>Q8 Current trends in the measurement and evaluation market (base: 34) </li></ul><ul><li>Chart does not include % saying “neither agree nor disagree” </li></ul>Proportion disagreeing 6%
    6. 7. Increased Interest in International Measurement and Social Media; ad hoc programmes on the decline <ul><li>Q8 Current trends in the measurement and evaluation market (base: 34) </li></ul><ul><li>Chart does not include % saying “neither agree nor disagree” </li></ul>Proportion disagreeing 6% 47% 3%
    7. 8. Towards an evaluation standard for marketing PR – market mix modelling Speaker Richard Houghton President ICCO on behalf of New York University
    8. 9. Lou Capozzi Immediate Past President, ICCO and Professor, New York University
    9. 10. <ul><li>Team of graduate students from NYU’s Masters Degree program in public relations and corporate communications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Supervised by Prof. Capozzi </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Gained a grant from NYU and support form the International Communications Consultants Organisation </li></ul><ul><li>Broad review of the literature </li></ul><ul><li>Goal – seek commonalities </li></ul>NYU Student Audit
    10. 11. <ul><li>Large PR firm models </li></ul><ul><li>Country models </li></ul><ul><ul><li>UK, Canada and Germany </li></ul></ul><ul><li>PR measurement vendor models </li></ul><ul><li>Advertising models </li></ul><ul><li>Market mix modelling vendors </li></ul>NYU Student Audit - Areas Covered
    11. 12. <ul><ul><li>Real need and appetite for a standardise approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enormous breadth and diversity of existing approaches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Variation is too great to be rationalised into a single model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>All models have a common flaw </li></ul></ul>NYU Student Audit – Conclusions
    12. 13. <ul><ul><li>Broadly adopted by large-scale marketers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Readily available for PR to connect to </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enables comparisons between all the elements in the marketing mix </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fits with many existing PR evaluation techniques </li></ul></ul>Why market mix modelling?
    13. 14. <ul><ul><li>Focused tightly on marketing PR, especially for large-scale programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vendor neutral </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strikes an effective balance between cost and credibility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Presented in terms familiar to marketers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Practical with low barriers to entry </li></ul></ul>Model requirements
    14. 15. <ul><ul><li>Total PR program costs (negotiated rates) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Markets covered </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Circulation/audience reach (no multipliers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Impressions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tone/Quality score </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Impact score </li></ul></ul>Potential Data Elements
    15. 16. <ul><ul><li>Up front commitment required </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Historical data needed for MMMs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weekly tracking generally required </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Larger PR investments required to show impact </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Budgets need to be tied to PR program elements </li></ul></ul>Challenges
    16. 17. <ul><ul><li>Meet with thought leaders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>AMEC US and agency research leaders </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Corporate pioneers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Meet with MMM vendors, in-house operations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Propose a standard </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get AMEC support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seek support from major PR associations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promote </li></ul></ul>Next Steps
    17. 19. John Paluszek Chair Global Alliance For Public Relations and Communication Management
    18. 20. <ul><li>Mission: To raise standards and promote public relations globally </li></ul><ul><li>Mantra: &quot;We can -- and we must -- all learn from each other&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Members: National PR associations in 70 countries and leading international PR associations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Serving 175,000 practitioners and educators. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Wide range of services: &quot;Landscapes&quot; of PR in 22 countries . Global PR education study </li></ul>The Global Alliance For Public Relations and Communication Management
    19. 21. Signature Event The Stockholm Accords
    20. 22. &quot; Stockholm Accords&quot; Measurement Opportunities <ul><li>Effectiveness of public relations communications/messages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Credibility of source </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credibility of content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Familiarity of content </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Long term effectiveness of &quot;Stockholm Accords&quot; </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Integration of public relations into university management curriculum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Appointments of public relations professionals in C-suites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improved respect for the profession in business and general media </li></ul></ul>
    21. 23. The Consultancy View Programme Measurement Principles Richard Houghton
    22. 24. International Communications Consultancy Organisation <ul><li>Umbrella organisation for 1500 PR agencies in 28 countries </li></ul><ul><li>Our members are PR trade associations </li></ul><ul><li>Remit: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Standards – CMS in 15 countries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Forums – senior management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Insight – World Report </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Huge variety in the maturity of individual markets </li></ul>
    23. 25. ICCO Members’ Views
    24. 26. The Consultancy View Principles need to be… <ul><li>Based on straight forward and easily understood methodology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Needs to be understood and used by all account handlers at all levels </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Applicable across PR disciplines </li></ul><ul><li>Structured to allow for growing digital and social media communications </li></ul>
    25. 27. The Consultancy View We like to think evaluation differentiates <ul><li>Many agencies feel that their proprietary evaluation processes give them a competitive edge </li></ul><ul><li>We may, of course ,be kidding ourselves! </li></ul><ul><li>If clients adopt the principles, consultants will too </li></ul>
    26. 28. The ugly reality AVEs work for the finance guy (mostly) <ul><li>No they don’t give provide insight into the effectiveness of a programme or campaign </li></ul><ul><li>No you can’t really compare advertising with PR </li></ul><ul><li>No they don’t take in account tonality or stance </li></ul><ul><li>No they are no use at all for the vast majority of online activity </li></ul><ul><li>But…. </li></ul><ul><li>… if finance guys want them consultancies are likely to provide them </li></ul>
    27. 29. Creating the Declaration of Measurement Principles <ul><li>Institute for Public Relations Commission on Public Relations Measurement and Evaluation </li></ul>Pauline Draper – Chair, IPR Commission
    28. 30. The Commission Who are we and what do we do? <ul><li>The Commission is unique in that it comprises some of the leading thinkers from </li></ul><ul><li>academia </li></ul><ul><li>corporate/government/not-for-profit </li></ul><ul><li>agency </li></ul><ul><li>research provider </li></ul><ul><li>Our purpose </li></ul><ul><li>to establish best practice for PR research and measurement </li></ul><ul><li>to issue authoritative White Papers </li></ul><ul><li>to promote excellence in PR research and measurement through the Jack Felton Golden Ruler Awards and partnering with others </li></ul>
    29. 31. Example White Papers Available from InstituteforPR.org <ul><li>A primer on measuring corporate reputation: a case study on the Dow Chemical Company </li></ul><ul><li>Doing Measurement Right: One Organization’s Experience Creating a Best-In-Class Measurement Program from Scratch </li></ul><ul><li>Isolating the Effects of Media-based Public Relations on Sales: Public Relations Optimization Through Marketing Mix Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Using Web Analytics to Measure the Impact of Earned Online Media on Business Outcomes: A Methodological Approach  </li></ul><ul><li>A New Paradigm for Media Analysis: Weighted Media Cost </li></ul><ul><li>Guidelines for Setting Measurable Public Relations Objectives: An Update </li></ul>
    30. 32. <ul><li>Definition: The calculation of space or time used for earned media (publicity or news content) by comparing it to the cost of that same space or time if purchased for advertising. </li></ul><ul><li>AVE is used because it assigns a monetary value to public relations using a metric that is simple to understand, simple to calculate, and uses data that is readily available. </li></ul><ul><li>AVE suggests that the space/time occupied by earned media is equivalent to the same space/time purchased </li></ul><ul><li>AVE is not a proxy for measuring public relations’ ROI </li></ul>Advertising Value Equivalents Why not? Outcomes rather than Outputs or Outtakes
    31. 33. <ul><li>Measurement and evaluation practices should demonstrate the effectiveness of public relations to help meet organizational goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Measuring the quality of public relations output is necessary in order to demonstrate its contribution to reaching these goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Any measure of media coverage should include variables such as tone , prominence , placement , appearance of key messages , the portion of story that applies to the organization or its key messages, and the credibility and targeted reach of the medium in which the message appears . </li></ul><ul><li>Whenever possible, it is best to link media coverage with expected outcomes . These outcomes should also be tied to organizational goals. </li></ul>Advertising Value Equivalents Measuring the Value of this Marketing Communication
    32. 34. Measuring OUTCOMES <ul><li>Benchmarking: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To past performance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To closest rival </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To competitors </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Map outputs to other metrics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Share price </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sales </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Web analytics data </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Specific research: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pre/post survey </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Message testing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Journalist audit </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Utilize other data: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Surveys </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Marketing mixed modeling / econometric modeling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Client and Employee satisfaction studies </li></ul></ul>Practices for taking measurement further
    33. 35. Barcelona Declaration of Measurement Principles Public Relations Society of America Gary McCormick Chairman and CEO
    34. 36. <ul><li>As a first step, ensuring that four basic questions are asked regarding the work that is to be undertaken: </li></ul><ul><li>Whom are you seeking to affect? </li></ul><ul><li>What about them are you seeking to affect? </li></ul><ul><li>How much must they be affected to be successful? </li></ul><ul><li>By when does this effect need to occur? </li></ul>The Business Case for Public Relations A framework for building measurement into public relations programs – a lexicon and recommended approaches.
    35. 37. <ul><li>Financial </li></ul><ul><li>Generates Revenue, Sales, Profit; Marketing public relations drives sales. </li></ul><ul><li>Investor public relations drives investment, valuation. </li></ul><ul><li>Public relations drives donations and membership for relevant organizations. </li></ul><ul><li>Reputation / Brand Equity </li></ul><ul><li>Increases likelihood to purchase / consider your brand(s). </li></ul><ul><li>Minimizes the effects of a crisis and rebuilds trust. Establishes credibility </li></ul><ul><li>Employees and other Internal Publics </li></ul><ul><li>Increases employee satisfaction and engagement, leading to greater efficiency, increased retention, reduced turnover, lower recruiting costs and higher productivity. </li></ul><ul><li>Public Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Creates public awareness, understanding and support for legislation, regulation and political candidates. </li></ul><ul><li>Affects voter behavior. Helps pass legislation, regulation and initiatives. </li></ul>As a second step, connect the desired outcomes to strategic goals – one of four key areas:
    36. 38. <ul><li>Financial </li></ul><ul><li>Consumer response: Field consumer survey; determine purchase levels and exposure to public relations results; isolate causal effects through statistical analysis. </li></ul><ul><li>Market Mix Modeling / Econometric Modeling: Gather public relations output / outcome data by function, market, region and time period; factor revenue-generation by market, by region and over time. Apply regression analysis. </li></ul><ul><li>Reputation / Brand Equity </li></ul><ul><li>Benchmark reputation / relationship metrics via survey prior to a campaign; repeat every three to six months. </li></ul><ul><li>Correlate attitudinal studies with customer purchase attitudes and behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Employees and other Internal Publics </li></ul><ul><li>Compare control groups to employee populations exposed to public relations activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on performance outcomes, not attitudes or awareness, such as employee satisfaction and engagement findings, employee turnover statistics and other recruitment data. </li></ul><ul><li>Public Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Use tracking services to track awareness, correlate to public relations activity, and connect to actual votes recorded and legislative outcomes. </li></ul>Third, measure the desired outcomes not in terms of outputs – clips or activity – but in terms of outcomes:
    37. 39. Barcelona Declaration of Measurement Principles AMEC U.S. & Agency Leaders Chapter Tim Marklein Executive VP, Measurement & Strategy Weber Shandwick
    38. 40. AMEC’s first international chapter. Launched in fall 2009. Provides a networking forum for U.S. research and agency leaders. Represented on AMEC Board by inaugural chair David Rockland of Ketchum. Includes 16 members: Existing AMEC Members: BurrellesLuce, Cision, Dow Jones, Echo Research, Report International, VMS Large Agency Research Leaders: Edelman/StrategyOne, Fleishman-Hillard, Hill & Knowlton, Ketchum, MS&L, Ogilvy, Weber Shandwick Midsize Agencies and Specialist Research Firms: Chandler Chicco, Evolve24, Leading Communicators U.S. & Agency Leaders Chapter
    39. 41. Topic #1. Ad Value Equivalency <ul><li>Building on IPR Commission’s Oct’09 vote to “condemn the name, concept and practice of AVEs,” we agreed to the following fundamental principles: </li></ul><ul><li>This topic is germane to AMEC. </li></ul><ul><li>Outcome based metrics – attributes, behavior, business results, etc. – should always be used in preference to output metrics, whenever possible. </li></ul><ul><li>When measures are based on cost of media space or time, they should be referred to as “costs” not “values.” </li></ul><ul><li>If media costs are used, they should be adjusted for quality (tone, message, etc.) and for the actual space or time occupied by a client or competitors. </li></ul><ul><li>Multipliers should not be used unless validated by third-party audits, surveys or market mix models. </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiated rates should be used (not rate cards). </li></ul><ul><li>Methodologies must be transparent and repeatable. </li></ul>
    40. 42. Topic #2. Social Media Measurement (part one of two) <ul><li>Building on AMEC U.S. member experience, we agreed to the following fundamental principles: </li></ul><ul><li>Social media can be measured. </li></ul><ul><li>Social media measurement is a discipline and a process, not a tool. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no “single metric” for social media. </li></ul><ul><li>Media content analysis has a fundamental role in social media measurement – and should be supplemented by web and search analytics, sales and CRM data, survey data and other methods. </li></ul><ul><li>Organizations need clearly defined goals and outcomes for social media in order to measure it. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Refer to PRSA “Business Outcomes” outline: http://comprehension.prsa.org/?p=628 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Refer to Altimeter Group “Social Marketing Analytics” outline: http://bit.ly/dldIHf </li></ul></ul>
    41. 43. Topic #2. Social Media Measurement (part two of two) <ul><li>Building on AMEC U.S. member experience, we agreed to the following fundamental principles: </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating quality and quantity together is critical, just as it is with conventional media. </li></ul><ul><li>Given the scale and volume of social media, technology-assisted analysis is necessary – but human reading and coding is still valuable for precision analysis of tone, messaging, nuance, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Measurement must adapt to the media, focusing on “conversation” and “communities” not “coverage.” </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding reach and influence is important, but existing sources are not accessible, transparent or consistent enough to be reliable. </li></ul><ul><li>Experimentation and testing are key to success – though measurement and communication fundamentals still apply. </li></ul>
    42. 44. Topic #3. Market Mix Modelling <ul><li>Building on the initial NYU market mix modeling report and AMEC U.S. member experience, we agreed to the following fundamental principles: </li></ul><ul><li>Clients are creating demand for market mix models to evaluate the impact of consumer marketing. </li></ul><ul><li>The PR industry needs to understand the value and implications of market mix models for accurate evaluation of consumer marketing PR, in contrast to other measurement approaches. </li></ul><ul><li>The PR industry needs to develop PR measures that can provide reliable input into market mix models. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Such measures might focus on media quantity and quality, messaging and audience impact, traditional versus social media, consistency with other marketing disciplines, etc. </li></ul></ul>
    43. 45. Topic #4. Transparency <ul><li>Clients are entitled to know how their content was obtained and the methodology used to append any metadata to that content: </li></ul><ul><li>Sources : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Print - Physical clippings, aggregator feeds, website links </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Broadcast – closed caption text, speech to text, manual observation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet – aggregators, spiders, text scrapes, screen views </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blogs – main post only or post plus comments and forwards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Qualitative assessments : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Human or machine scored, sampled or all coverage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tone – criteria for scoring should be clear and shared </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reach metrics – the source of the data and the criteria they are based upon should be clear, i.e. persons 2 + , persons 18 + , daily or monthly visitors, unique visitors, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other – content analysis of messages, scorecards, calculated measures such as impact scores or value scores should be understandable and not a “black box” </li></ul></ul>
    44. 47. Networking Refreshment Break
    45. 49. A Declaration of Measurement Principles David Rockland Partner / CEO, Managing Director Ketchum AMEC Board Member IPR Measurement Commission, Past Chairman
    46. 50. TELE-VOTING SYSTEM
    47. 51. The debate: how to vote <ul><li>You will be advised when to vote </li></ul><ul><li>You will be given clear options on which to vote </li></ul><ul><li>Please click your preferred option during the voting time </li></ul><ul><li>To change your option, click again. The last one you record will be the one accepted by the system </li></ul><ul><li>The result will be shown on the screen once all voting finishes </li></ul><ul><li>Summit staff will collect the voting keypads at the end of the conference </li></ul><ul><li>Further opportunity for comment to [email_address] until July 15 </li></ul>
    48. 52. Our Summit Voting Test! <ul><li>Q. Is Catalan the officially spoken language in Barcelona? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>YES: Press 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NO: Press 2 </li></ul></ul>
    49. 53. Seven Principles <ul><li>Importance of Goal Setting and Measurement </li></ul><ul><li>Media Measurement Requires Quantity and Quality </li></ul><ul><li>AVEs are not the Value of Public Relations </li></ul><ul><li>Social Media Can and Should be Measured </li></ul><ul><li>Measuring Outcomes is Preferred to Measuring Media Results </li></ul><ul><li>Business Results Can and Should Be Measured Where Possible </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency and Replicability are Paramount to Sound Measurement </li></ul>
    50. 54. Principle 1:Importance of Goal Setting and Measurement <ul><li>Goal-setting and measurement are fundamental aspects of any public relations program </li></ul><ul><li>Goals should be as quantitative as possible and address who, what, when and how much the PR program is intended to affect </li></ul><ul><li>Measurement should include representative traditional and social media; target audience changes in awareness, comprehension, attitude, and behavior as applicable; and business results </li></ul>
    51. 55. The Seven Principles <ul><li>Principle 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of Goal Setting </li></ul><ul><li>and Measurement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>YES: Press 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NO: Press 2 </li></ul></ul>
    52. 56. Principle 2: Media Measurement Requires Quantity and Quality <ul><li>Overall clip counts and general impressions are usually meaningless. Instead, media measurement, whether in traditional or online channels, should account for: </li></ul><ul><li>Impressions among the target audience </li></ul><ul><li>Quality of the media coverage including: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Tone </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Credibility </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Message Delivery </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Inclusion of a 3 rd party or company spokesperson </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prominence </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Visual dimensions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Quality can be negative, positive, or neutral </li></ul>
    53. 57. The Seven Principles <ul><li>Principle 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Media Measurement Requires </li></ul><ul><li>Quantity and Quality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>YES: Press 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NO: Press 2 </li></ul></ul>
    54. 58. Principle 3: AVEs are Not the Value of Public Relations <ul><li>Advertising Value Equivalents (AVEs) do not measure the value of public relations and do not inform future activity; they measure the cost of media space </li></ul><ul><li>Where a comparison is to be made between the cost of space from earned versus paid media, validated metrics such as Weighted Media Cost should be used and reflect: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>negotiated advertising rates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>quality of the coverage (see Principle 2), including negative results </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>physical space of the coverage, and the portion of the coverage that is relevant </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Multipliers intended to reflect a greater WMC for earned versus paid media should never be applied unless proven to exist in the specific case </li></ul>
    55. 59. The Seven Principles <ul><li>Principle 3 </li></ul><ul><li>AVEs are Not the Value of </li></ul><ul><li>Public Relations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>YES: Press 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NO: Press 2 </li></ul></ul>
    56. 60. Principle 4: Social Media Can and Should Be Measured <ul><li>Social media measurement is a discipline, not a tool; but there is no “single metric” </li></ul><ul><li>Organizations need clearly defined goals and outcomes for social media </li></ul><ul><li>Media content analysis should be supplemented by web and search analytics, sales and CRM data, survey data and other methods </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluating quality and quantity is critical, just as it is with conventional media </li></ul><ul><li>Given the scale and volume of social media, technology-assisted analysis is necessary – human reading and coding is valuable for precision analysis of tone, messaging, nuance, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Measurement must focus on “conversation” and “communities” not “coverage” </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding reach and influence is important, but existing sources are not accessible, transparent or consistent enough to be reliable; experimentation and testing are key to success </li></ul>
    57. 61. The Seven Principles <ul><li>Principle 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Social Media Can and Should </li></ul><ul><li>Be Measured </li></ul><ul><ul><li>YES: Press 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NO: Press 2 </li></ul></ul>
    58. 62. Principle 5: Measuring Outcomes is Preferred to Measuring Media Results <ul><li>Outcomes include shifts in awareness, comprehension, attitude and behavior related to purchase, donations, brand equity, corporate reputation, employee engagement, public policy, investment decisions, and other shifts in target audiences regarding a company, NGO, government or entity, as well as the audience’s own beliefs and behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Benchmark and tracking survey research are the preferred practices for quantitative measurement </li></ul><ul><li>Standard best practices in survey research including sample design, question wording and order, and statistical analysis should be applied in total transparency </li></ul>
    59. 63. The Seven Principles <ul><li>Principle 5 </li></ul><ul><li>Measuring Outcomes is </li></ul><ul><li>Preferred to Measuring Media Results </li></ul><ul><ul><li>YES: Press 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NO: Press 2 </li></ul></ul>
    60. 64. Principle 6: Business Results Can and Should Be Measured Where Possible <ul><li>Models that determine the effects of the quantity and quality of PR outputs on sales or other business metrics, while accounting for other variables that drive sales, are a preferred choice for measuring consumer or brand marketing. Related points are: </li></ul><ul><li>Clients are creating demand for market mix models to evaluate the impact of consumer marketing </li></ul><ul><li>The PR industry needs to understand the value and implications of market mix models for accurate evaluation of consumer marketing PR, in contrast to other measurement approaches </li></ul><ul><li>The PR industry needs to develop PR measures that can provide reliable input into market mix models </li></ul><ul><li>Survey research can also be used to isolate the change in purchasing, purchase preference or attitude shift resulting from exposure to PR initiatives </li></ul>
    61. 65. The Seven Principles <ul><li>Principle 6 </li></ul><ul><li>Business Results Can and </li></ul><ul><li>Should Be Measured Where Possible </li></ul><ul><ul><li>YES: Press 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NO: Press 2 </li></ul></ul>
    62. 66. Principle 7: Transparency and Replicability are Paramount to Sound Measurement <ul><li>PR measurement should be done in a manner that is transparent and replicable meaning the detailing of: </li></ul><ul><li>Media Measurement: </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative – source of the content: print, broadcast, internet, consumer generated media along with criteria used for collection </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative – human or automated, tone, reach to target, content, overall media impact </li></ul><ul><li>Surveys: </li></ul><ul><li>Methodology –sampling frame and size, margin of error, probability or non-probability </li></ul><ul><li>Questions – all should be released as asked </li></ul><ul><li>Statistical methodology- how specific metrics are calculated </li></ul>
    63. 67. The Seven Principles <ul><li>Principle 7 </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency and Replicability are </li></ul><ul><li>Paramount to Sound Measurement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>YES: Press 1 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NO: Press 2 </li></ul></ul>
    64. 68. Next Steps: Panel Organizations Delegates AMEC
    65. 69. THE RESULTS Yes No 1. Importance of Goal Setting and Measurement 97% 3% 2. Media Measurement Requires Quantity and Quality 97% 3% <ul><li>3. AVEs are not the Value of Public Relations </li></ul><ul><li>Do not measure the value of PR or future activity </li></ul><ul><li>Where comparisons made validated metrics should be used </li></ul><ul><li>Multipliers never be applied unless proven to exist </li></ul>70% 92% 57% 72% 30% 8% 43% 28% 4. Social Media Can and Should be Measured 93% 7% 5. Measuring Outcomes is Preferred to Measuring Media Results 87% 13% 6. Business Results Can and Should Be Measured Where Possible 86% 14% 7. Transparency and Replicability are Paramount to Sound Measurement 95% 5%

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