2014 - 6 - Paving the way to a virtualized base station

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Network Functions Virtualization (NFV), Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Software Defined Access (SDA) are all poised to transform the traditional complex appliance based networks into software running on standard COTS infrastructure. One of the last bastions of this transformation is the wireless access, the base station. This presentation will review the opportunities and challenges related to the base station, use cases and proposed ways to overcome it, with a sneak preview to ASOCS's disruptive Virtual Base station design and approach.

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2014 - 6 - Paving the way to a virtualized base station

  1. 1. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 1© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 Paving the way to a virtualized Base Station Eran Bello, VP Products & Marketing ASOCS eran@asocstech.com Linley Carrier Conference June 10-12th,2014 , Santa Clara, CA
  2. 2. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 2© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 The Carriers Problem ► Data usage is exploding ► It seems like everyone has a smartphone ► Consumers upload video to Facebook, YouTube and the like ► Consumers download video clips more than they watch TV ► Revenues remain flat ► Consumers reluctant to pay more ► Wi-Fi made users used to the notion that data is free ► Competition prevent price increase ► Carriers keen to reduce capital and operating costs ► The network is built from “endless” proprietary gear ► Expensive, cumbersome, vendor lock and does not scale ► Hard to keep up with new wireless technologies and generations ► Carriers wish to increase service agility across their network Voice Era Data Era
  3. 3. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 3© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 Telecom NFV: Network Functions Virtualization ► Consolidation of traditional network functions onto standard servers, storage and switches ► Driven by largest carriers of the world ► Driven by ETSI ISG with more than 280 member companies ► Drive the Telecom eco-system including integrators, solution and technology providers ► Server scalability and virtualization technologies have matured and can deliver on the promise of hardware ubiquity
  4. 4. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 4© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 Dealing with Dynamic Mobile Network Load ► The “Tidal effect“: Subscribers are frequently moving network load from one place to another in a similar pattern ► The challenges of traditional fixed network topology ► Each Base-station processing capability can be used by the active users in its cell only ► Idle Base-stations in areas/times and oversubscribed in other areas ► Each Base-station designed to have much more capacity than the average needed
  5. 5. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 5© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 ► C-RAN Value Proposition ► Shared processing resources: Reduce overall Baseband size ► By region, by frequency and by standards: 2G/3G/4G ► Simplify deployment: Significant OPEX and CAPEX reduction ► Faster system roll out, Faster upgrade to future wireless standards ► Energy efficient: Saves up to 70% compared with traditional RAN C-RAN: Cloud Radio Access Networks
  6. 6. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 6© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 C-RAN: Cloud Radio Access Networks ► APAC: Strong momentum ► China Mobile, KT and SKT and NTT ► North America and Europe ► Fit the Carriers Het.Net vision ► Regional based ► Fit DAS market Distributed Antenna System ► In-Building ► Stadium, Campus
  7. 7. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 7© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 Telecom NFV Infrastructure and Use Cases ► Virtualization of traditional network functions such as Security, CDN, IMS, EPC and BS ► ETSI NFV Use case #6: “Virtualizing the Mobile Base Station” NFV: Network Functions Virtualization NFVI: NFV Infrastructure
  8. 8. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 8© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 NFV Use Case #6: virtual Base Station ► SoftRAN: Radio Access Networks optimization ► Manage and migrate the VMs by dynamic probing ► RTOS: Real Time Operating System virtualization ► I/O virtualization ► BBU : BaseBand Unit virtualization ► Dynamic allocation of the processing resources ► PHY infrastructure optimization ► Manage and optimize PHY layer in Cloud architecture. ► CoMP: Coordinated Multipoint decisions ► Interference cancellation ► Handover performance optimization (X2 U-Plane) ► SON: Self Organized Networks
  9. 9. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 9© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 vBS: virtual Base Station Description ► vBS often called vRAN: virtual Radio Access Network ► A software based implementation of traditional base station ► Deployed in virtual machines on standard COTS servers ► Enable shared and dynamic resource allocation
  10. 10. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 10© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 vBS Design and Goals ► The vBS as any other vNF: virtual Network Function ► Co-located at the same Datacenter as other vNFs ► Modular, Reliable, Agile, Simple, Scalable, Open ► In accordance with the ETSI ISG NFV framework ► Exceed the demanding performance of the traditional BS ► High processing power and high data rates ► Coverage and capacity ► Low latency requirements ► Enable the network to evolve faster than ever before ► Aim to disrupt the dynamics in the cellular industry
  11. 11. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 11© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 vBS vs. Traditional Base Station Traditional Base Station vBS Location Cell tower Datacenter Equipment Supporting local worst case Supporting average load CapEx Expensive: Closed box solution Affordable: Commodity pricing Agility Designed for specific scenario Dynamically reconfigurable Capacity Limited by design Flexible, supporting CoMP Sourcing Telecom Equipment IT Equipment OpEx High: Cooling, Security, Distributed Low: Centralized
  12. 12. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 12© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 vBS as a NFV vNF: virtual Network Function NFV vNF Requirement vBS Management and Orchestration The vBS defines the resources for each state in its lifecycle • Installation, execution, upgrade, migration, scaling Performance Each vBS includes the list of resources it requires in order to support the needed performance Scalability The vBS supports dynamic scaling • Carrier aggregation Portability The vBS compute and networking components meet standard NFV infrastructure requirements Openness All software in C Migration and co-existence The vBS works with regular RRU devices and EPC: Evolved Packet Core software vBS  vRAN  vWNW (virtual Wireless Network)
  13. 13. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 13© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 The ASOCS vBS Solution ► Supports near infinite amount of BS configurations ► Base Station L1/L2/L3 deployed in virtual machines ► ASOCS virtualizes the entire L1 ► Adaptive partitioning of PHY resources between CPU and HW Accelerator ► Based on ASOCS Software Programmable platform ► Modular design enable flexible business operation model vEPC: Cell Towers RRUs vBS - vNF L1 ACC vNFC VF on HWA L1 ACC vNFC VF on HWA L1 ACC vNFC VF on HWA L1 vNFC VM on x86 L1 vNFC VM on x86 L1 SW vNFC VM on CPU L2 vNFC VM on x86 L2 vNFC VM on x86 L2 vNFC VM on CPU L3 vNFC VM on x86 L3 vNFC VM on x86 L3 vNFC VM on CPUVFs on HWA VMs on CPU VMs on CPU VMs on CPU Management and Orchestration System
  14. 14. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 14© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 CloudBS and Front-Haul Switch Topology ► Leveraging ASOCS L1 ACC in a remote HWA Architecture ► Shared resource serving a cluster of standard servers 10/40/100Gbps 100Gbps C-RAN Fronthaul Switch with L1 ACC L1/L2/L3 10/40/100Gbps 100Gbps C-RAN Fronthaul Switch with L1 ACC L1/L2/L3 Rack 1 Rack 2 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 CPRI to ETH None Blocking Switch L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 CPRI to ETH None Blocking Switch CPRI/ETH CPRI/ETH 10/40/100Gbps 100Gbps C-RAN Fronthaul Switch with L1 ACC L1/L2/L3 Rack n L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 L1 CPRI to ETH None Blocking Switch CPRI/ETH 10x100Gbps 10x100Gbps 10x100Gbps 10x100Gbps 10x100Gbps 10x100Gbps 100Gbps 100Gbps Fat-tree SDN Switch Network ToR Aggregation RRU VM VM L1 L1L1 L2/L3 L2/L3L2/L3 VFs on HWA VFs on HWA VFs on HWA VM VM L1 L1L1 L2/L3 L2/L3L2/L3 VM VM L1 L1L1 L2/L3 L2/L3L2/L3
  15. 15. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 15© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 Cloud Base Station in an NFV OpenStack System ► Configuration and operation through OpenStack interfaces ► HWA resources through “Nova” Interface ► Longer term potential foundation of “Magma” HWA Interface ► Enable HWA specific customization VIM: OpenStack ASOCS CloudCOMM “Nova” Compute CPU “Neutron” Networking “Cinder” Storage Management and Orchestration System Virtual Base Station CloudCOMM Dynamic Configurator “Nova” “Magma” HWA Computation resources Networks resources Storage resources L1 ACC MPU Pool (BB Acceleration)
  16. 16. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 16© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 ► Ideal for Telecom NFV and C-RAN environments ► NFV: Network Functions Virtualization ► C-RAN: Cloud - Radio Access Networks Cloud Base Sation Solution ASOCS software ASOCS platform technology ASOCS software to TEMs and Carriers enabling serversto run virtual base- station as an “app.” ASOCS platform technology enabling design gear that accelerates and enhances server performance and capacity ASOCS vBS: Base Stations in virtual machines L1 Accelerator: Processes the information from the antenna and sends packets to the server Telecom Data Center The last major obstacle en route to a full Software based Wireless Network
  17. 17. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 17© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 ASOCS SDA: Software Defined Access ► SDA allows Carriers to manage Base Station resources easily through virtualization of the L1 functionality ► Replaces the traditional manual configuration and deployment of hardware based L1 processing ► The emergence of C-RAN, in which a cellular network uses a centralized or regional Server Farm to process cell site traffic at the L1 level, makes SDA critical ► SDA decouples the specific hardware of a given cell site and or C-RAN baseband resource pool, the L1 data plane, from the upper stack software and signaling management, the L2 and up control plane ► SDA mitigate vendor interoperability risk and enable advanced network features such as CoMP and massive dense networks
  18. 18. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 18© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Eran Bello August 6, 2014 Summary ► Virtual Base Stations have overwhelming advantages over the traditional implementation ► ETSI ISG NFV has defined a virtual Base Station and its goals ► vBS must cover all the layers of the stack including L1 ► vBS L1 Accelerator shall support both server attached and remote HWA topologies ► vBS pave the way to Software Defined Wireless Access (SDWA) ► SDA enable numerous business models and opportunities in RAN
  19. 19. © 2007-2012 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. 19© 2007-2014 ASOCS Ltd. All rights reserved. Thank you

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