Swackhamer - What Can States Do: Lessons from the California Green Chemistry Initiative

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Presentation by Deb Swackhamer of the University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Center for Science Technology and Public Policy at the July 20, 2011 meeting of the MN Chemical …

Presentation by Deb Swackhamer of the University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs, Center for Science Technology and Public Policy at the July 20, 2011 meeting of the MN Chemical Regulation and Policy Project Work Group.

http://www.environmental-initiative.org/projects/minnesota-chemical-regulation-a-policy

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  • 1. Lessons  from  the  California  Green  Chemistry   Initiative  
  • 2. Some  Context:  Excerpts  from  memo  from  CA  Secretary  of  Environmental  Protec8on    —  “A  growing  body  of  science  and  literature  is  emerging  identifying  a   variety  of  concerns  and  challenges  regarding  the  use  and   regulation  of  chemicals.    —  In  the  absence  of  a  unifying  approach,  interest  groups  and  policy   makers  have  been  attempting  to  take  these  issues  on  one-­‐by-­‐one.   Product  by  product,  chemical  by  chemical,  and  now  even  city  by   city  approaches  can  often  have  unintended,  even  regrettable   consequences,  even  with  the  best  of  intentions.    —  we  need  to  develop  a  coordinated,  comprehensive  strategy   designed  to  foster  the  development  of  information  on  the  hazards   posed  by  chemicals,  ways  to  reduce  exposure  to  dangerous  substances,   approaches  that  encourage  cleaner  and  less  polluting  industrial   processes,  and  strategies  to  encourage  manufacturers  to  take  greater   responsibility  for  the  products  they  produce.    —  Our  strategy,  and  the  policy  that  it  champions,  must  have  at  its  core   and  be  governed  by  sound  science.”  
  • 3. “California  Green  Chemistry  Ini3a3ve  Phase  1:  A  Compila3on  of  Op3ons”,  January  2008   Conversation  with  California  —  brainstorming  sessions  –  6  all  around  the  state,  multi-­‐ stakeholder  —  Green  Chemistry  symposia  –  3  on  variety  of  topics  —  a  web  log  –  to  invite  ideas  to  be  conveyed  and   discussed  online  —  the  Science  Advisory  Panel  –  to  sift  through  results  of   Conversation  and  recommend  options  —  preparation  of  Phase  1  Report  
  • 4. “Green  Chemistry  Op3ons  for  the  State  of  California:    A  Report  from  the  Green  Chemistry  Ini3a3ve  Science  Advisory  Panel  to  Department  of  Toxic  Substances  Control  Director,  Maureen  Gorsen”,  May  2008  —  Seven  months  of  science  expert  panel  —  Framework  for  advancing  green  chemistry  and  a   collection  of  options  that  have  been  proposed  by  one   or  more  individuals  on  the  Panel  —  Will  require  utilization  of  policy  instruments  to   increase  both  supply  of  and  demand  for  greener   chemicals  
  • 5. Supply-­‐side  Op8ons  —  help  to  facilitate  the  creation  and  dissemination  of   greener  chemicals,  processes  and  technologies:     —  instilling  green  chemistry  into  education     —  supporting  research  and  innovation  in  green  chemistry   and  engineering     —  building  green  chemistry  capacity   —  providing  incentives  to  industry  and  recognition  of  its   efforts  
  • 6. Demand-­‐side  Op8ons  —  help  to  ensure  the  economic  viability  of  greener  chemicals   by  better  informing  the  market,  leveling  the  playing  field   on  which  greener  options  compete,  and  creating  a   regulatory  climate  that  drives  both  the  development  and   the  adoption  of  greener  alternatives:   —  identifying  and  prioritizing  chemicals  or  chemical  uses  of   concern     —  developing,  improving  and  effectively  employing  regulations   —  developing  incentives  to  boost  demand  for  green  chemistry    
  • 7. Addressing  all  three  gaps  in    data,  safety  and  technology:    —  supply-­‐side  focuses  more  on  the  technology  gap  —  demand  side  targets  the  data  gap  and  safety  gap  
  • 8. II.  Green  Chem  Op3ons  for  CA—the  Supply  Side   II.  A.  Green  Chemistry  and  Engineering  Education       —  1:  Train  K-­‐12  Science  Educators     —  2:  Develop  K-­‐12  Green  Chemistry  Teaching  Materials     —  3:  Develop  Green  Chem  Interdisciplinary  Education  Courses   —  4:  Integrate  Green  Chemistry  into  Higher  Education                          Chemistry  and  Chemical  Engineering  Curricula   —  5:  Develop  Fellowships  and  Internships  in  Green  Chemistry   —  6:  Promote  Green  Chemistry  in  Business  School  Education     —  7:  Support  new  Faculty  Positions  in  Green  Chemistry     —  8:  Introduce  Green  Chemistry  into  Vocational  and  Workforce                    Development  Training    Programs  
  • 9. Supply-­‐side,  Con3nued  II.  B.  Research,  Invention,  and  Innovation  in  the  Context  of  Green  Chemistry  and  Engineering    —  9:  Implement  a  process  to  identify  all  on-­‐going  efforts  in                    Green  Chemistry  Science  &  Technology,  identify  gaps  —  10:  Support  Green  Chemistry  R&D  Efforts    —  11:  Promote,  Encourage,  and  Facilitate  the  Development   of                    Industry  –  University  Partnerships  —  12:  Strengthen  the  Green  Chemistry  Infrastructure  
  • 10. Supply-­‐side,  Con3nued  II.  C.  Other  Incentives  to  Boost  Green  Chem  Supply  —  13:  Implement  management  system  approaches  for  California                      Chemical  Manufacturers  —  14:  Promote  Green  Chemistry  by  Industry  Associations  —  15:  Promote  Value  Chain  Communications  —  16:  Awards  programs  and  competitions:  Establish  Green                        Chemistry  Innovation  Awards,  Governor’s  Green  Chemistry                      Award,  and/or  Green  Chemistry  Business  Plan  Competition  —  17:  Establish  a  “California  Chemistry  Research  Challenge”  —  18:  Develop  a  “Green  Chemistry  Web  Portal”  —  19:  Add  Green  Chemistry  to  State  Technical  Assistance  Programs  
  • 11. Supply-­‐side,  Con3nued  II.  D.  Evaluating  Products,  Problems  and  Potential  New  Solutions      —  20:  Advance  the  Science  of  Alternatives  Assessment  —  21:  Establish  one  or  more  independent  non-­‐profit                          institutes  to  identify,  develop,  and  test  safer    alternatives  
  • 12. III.  Green  Chem  –  The  Demand  Side  III.  A.  Identifying  and  prioritizing  chemicals  of  concern  —  22:  Adopt  a  policy  to  identify  chemicals  of  concern,                    and  develop  specific  criteria  for  this  purpose  —  23:  Develop  a  comprehensive  “map”  of  the  flow  of                    chemicals  in  California  —  24:  Help  advance  the  science  of  toxicology  —  25:  Target  Chemical  Uses  of  Concern  Based  on    Hazard,  Exposure  and  Risk  
  • 13. Demand-­‐side,  Con3nued  III.  B.  Regulations  —  26.  Require  chemical  manufacturers  and  importers  to  provide                        specific  information  about  hazards  and  uses  of  their  products.  —  27:  Require  companies  to  provide  chemical  information  to  Cal/EPA                        that  they  submit  to  other  authorities  —  28:  Require  product  manufacturers  and  importers  to  disclose                          chemical  ingredients  —  29:  Require  chemical  makers  and  users  to  systematically  identify                          and  consider  safer  alternatives  —  30:  Authorize  Cal/EPA  to  phase  out  hazardous  chemicals  —  31:  Phase  out  chlorinated  solvents  —  32:  Require  all  air  quality  management  districts  to  adopt  SCAQMD                        regulations  on  cleaning  products  
  • 14. Demand-­‐side,    Con3nued  III.  C.  Incentives  to  Boost  Demand  for  Green  Chem  —  33:  Provide  retailers  with  access  to  guides  for  selecting  greener  alternatives                        to  toxic  products,  via  a  retailer  clearinghouse.  —  34:  Develop  a  “green  scorecard”  for  chemical  products  that  lets  both                        producers  &  consumers  know  which  products  truly  are  greener.  —  35:  Screen  chemical  product  formulations  for  safety,  health  and                          environmental  preferability,  based  on  full  ingredient  disclosure  by  the                                  producer  to  the  screener.  —  36:  Incorporate  green  chemistry  criteria  into  state  procurement  processes.  —  37:  Provide  marketing  exposure  for  green  chemistry  products  and   processes.  —  38:  Create  a  web-­‐based  marketplace  for  greener  chemicals  and  products