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Agrarian Landscapes, the Environment and World Heritage: Why our region should apply for World Heritage Status
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Agrarian Landscapes, the Environment and World Heritage: Why our region should apply for World Heritage Status

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Professor Randy Stringer presents the third instalment of the Science Seminar Series at 1.10pm Friday 21 August. The Seminar entitled “Agrarian Landscapes, the Environment and World Heritage: Why …

Professor Randy Stringer presents the third instalment of the Science Seminar Series at 1.10pm Friday 21 August. The Seminar entitled “Agrarian Landscapes, the Environment and World Heritage: Why our region should apply for World Heritage Status.”

World Heritage Sites bring economic, social and cultural benefits to their communities. Along with global prestige comes increased investment, new business opportunities and potential ‘reputation premiums’ for local products. So, too, does an enhanced sense of local pride, place and identity. Only a handful of the 890 listed sites focus on agricultural landscapes; only a of few of those are ‘working agrarian landscapes’. The mosaic of agrarian landscapes, from the Fleurieu Peninsula to the Clare Valley, should apply for World Heritage status as this is an outstanding example of distinctive land use on a rare agro-ecosystem under threat of irreversible change.

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  • 1. The Environment Institute Where ideas grow Professor Randy Stringer Agrarian Landscapes, the Environment and World Heritage: Why our region should apply for World Heritage Status
  • 2. The Environment Institute UNESCO Treaty The World Heritage List: 890 properties the most outstanding examples of the world’s natural and cultural heritage Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 3. The Environment Institute Ten criteria, need to meet one Australian WHS Kakadu National Park Great Barrier Reef Willandra Lakes Region Tasmanian Wilderness Lord Howe Island Gondwana Rainforests Uluru-Kata Tjuta Shark Bay Wet Tropics Queensland Macquarie Island Heard and McDonald Islands Fraser Island Australian Fossil Mammal Sites Greater Blue Mountains Purnululu National Park Royal Exhibition Building Sydney Opera House Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 4. The Environment Institute Benefits of WHS • Protects endangered and unique sites • A catalyst for new business opportunities • Attracts investment, grants, funding • New and appropriate infrastructure • High quality architecture & landscape design • Improves coordination for more sustainable transport policies • Integrated planning & conservation policies • Branding opportunities for communities and local products Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 5. The Environment Institute Lavaux Vineyard Terraces Rice Terraces of the Philippine Cordillera Source: Wiki commons Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 6. The Environment Institute Alto Douro, Portugal Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 7. The Environment Institute Viñales Valley, Cuba Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 8. The Environment Institute Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 9. The Environment Institute Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 10. The Environment Institute Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 11. The Environment Institute Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 12. The Environment Institute Source: web Gallery of Art Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 13. The Environment Institute Source:web Gallery of Art Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 14. The Environment Institute Can we do it? Are we a rare agrarian landscape? Are we endangered? Heyson Trail, Mawson Trail, Yurebilla Trail, Torrens Linear Park, Wine trails, etc. Are we ‘tangibly associated with events or ideas of outstanding universal significance?’ Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 15. The Environment Institute John Stuart Mill (1806-1873), the most influential One of our tangibly associated English-speaking philosopher of the nineteenth ideas of significance century. His views are of continuing significance, and are generally recognized to be among the deepest and certainly the most effective defenses of empiricism. The overall aim of his philosophy is to develop a positive view of the universe and the place of humans in it, one which contributes to the progress of human knowledge, individual freedom and human well-being. Stanford university Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 16. The Environment Institute John Stuart Mill …the planning of colonies should be conducted, not with an exclusive view to the private interests of the first founders, but with a deliberate regard to the permanent welfare of the nation afterwards… …no plan is comparable in advantage to that advocated by Mr Wakefield…. Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 17. The Environment Institute Direct Indirect Private Food Production Food, wine and tourism Income generation Safe food Grapes and Wine Health, nutrition, prosperity Wages and businesses Business opportunities Public Tax revenue Soil conservation Health and nutrition Watershed services Exports/foreign exchange Biodiversity benefits Safe food Carbon sequestration Products for emerging Wildlife habitat agro-industries Cultural and heritage Food and wine tourism Rural viability habitatbility Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 18. The Environment Institute Beyond production….. the evolving roles of agriculture Better understand the full range of contributions by agriculture – direct and indirect links – public and private benefits – market and non-market mediated Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 19. The Environment Institute Why do it? Economic and heritage benefits Olympics for some, WHS for us Timing is so good, NRM Boards, rural councils, DPLG, Community groups No regrets strategy The process helps us better connect city and country Important role for Environment Institute Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 20. The Environment Institute The Role of the Environment Institute Resource Economics and Policy Centre CF Landscape Futures WM Water Research Centre JB Energy Business, finance SW and RZ Environmental and Cultural Geography GH FoodPlus Research Centre BG Waite Institute RL International Trade Institute AS Humanities Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 21. The Environment Institute Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 22. The Environment Institute Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 23. The Environment Institute Special thanks to Simon Bryant Cecil Camilleri Lauren Drewery Christopher Findlay Zannie Flanagan James Hillier Stephanine Johnston Anne Moroney References: Nature’s Metropolis, William Cronon On the Margins of the Good Earth, The South Australian wheat frontier 1869-1884, D. Meinig Paradise of Dissent: South Australia, Douglas Pike Killing dragons; the conquest of the Alps. Fergus Fleming. Principles of Political Economy. John Stuart Mill Life Impact The University of Adelaide
  • 24. The Environment Institute Where ideas grow Next Seminar: 28 August Professor Graeme Hugo Is water a limiting factor for population growth in South Australia?