5. Implement Search Tactics

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  • Many of the positions I’ve secured have involved multiple methods. For example, a recruiter contacted an acquaintance of mine – someone in my network who knows I am always receptive to talk to recruiters – and the recruiter calls me. Two of my jobs involved this combination, and many positions I explored but did not take also involved this combination.Make sure your network knows you are always receptive to recruiter calls (not necessarily looking for a job, just receptive).Also, I have a high percentage of unsolicited success. This is because I have found this technique particularly useful when looking for part-time, adjunct teaching roles.
  • Many of the positions I’ve secured have involved multiple methods. For example, a recruiter contacted an acquaintance of mine – someone in my network who knows I am always receptive to talk to recruiters – and the recruiter calls me. Two of my jobs involved this combination, and many positions I explored but did not take also involved this combination.Make sure your network knows you are always receptive to recruiter calls (not necessarily looking for a job, just receptive).Also, I have a high percentage of unsolicited success. This is because I have found this technique particularly useful when looking for part-time, adjunct teaching roles.
  • Many of the positions I’ve secured have involved multiple methods. For example, a recruiter contacted an acquaintance of mine – someone in my network who knows I am always receptive to talk to recruiters – and the recruiter calls me. Two of my jobs involved this combination, and many positions I explored but did not take also involved this combination.Make sure your network knows you are always receptive to recruiter calls (not necessarily looking for a job, just receptive).Also, I have a high percentage of unsolicited success. This is because I have found this technique particularly useful when looking for part-time, adjunct teaching roles.
  • Job Searching for ProfessionalsElizabeth A. Ruff, M.S. & Ed.S.Eric A. Weldy, Ed.D.Presented as part of the Florida State University Division of Student Affairs (DSA) Professional Development Committee’s Workshop Series.October 1, 2007http://studentaffairs.fsu.edu/profdev/Job%20Searching%20for%20Professionals%20-%20PowerPoint.ppt
  • Resources for Job Search and Career PlanningKho Su YianHon Sui Sen Memorial Library2009Job Searching for ProfessionalsElizabeth A. Ruff, M.S. & Ed.S.Eric A. Weldy, Ed.D.Presented as part of the Florida State University Division of Student Affairs (DSA) Professional Development Committee’s Workshop Series.October 1, 2007http://studentaffairs.fsu.edu/profdev/Job%20Searching%20for%20Professionals%20-%20PowerPoint.ppt
  • Job Searching for ProfessionalsElizabeth A. Ruff, M.S. & Ed.S.Eric A. Weldy, Ed.D.Presented as part of the Florida State University Division of Student Affairs (DSA) Professional Development Committee’s Workshop Series.October 1, 2007http://studentaffairs.fsu.edu/profdev/Job%20Searching%20for%20Professionals%20-%20PowerPoint.ppt
  • Job Searching for ProfessionalsElizabeth A. Ruff, M.S. & Ed.S.Eric A. Weldy, Ed.D.Presented as part of the Florida State University Division of Student Affairs (DSA) Professional Development Committee’s Workshop Series.October 1, 2007http://studentaffairs.fsu.edu/profdev/Job%20Searching%20for%20Professionals%20-%20PowerPoint.ppt
  • Job Searching in Today’s Economy with Today’s Technology Jessie Lombardo Senior Career CounselorCareer Development CenterCleveland 306716-878-5811www.buffalostate.edu/offices/cdc
  • 5. Implement Search Tactics

    1. 1. Implement Your Search Tactics 1 JOB SEARCHING OVERVIEW RESEARCHING EMPLOYERS NETWORKING Career Fairs PROFESSIONAL RECRUITERS RESPONDING TO JOB ADS UNSOLICITED APPLICATIONS Posting Resumes Targeted Mailings
    2. 2. Job Searching Overview 2YOU SHOULD ALWAYS BE PASSIVELY IN THE MARKET FOR A NEW POSITION BUT WHEN YOU ARE ACTIVELY LOOKING, JOB SEARCHING BECOMES YOUR JOB
    3. 3. Pierson’s Seven Job Search Techniques 3 Orville Pierson, author of Highly Effective Job Searching identifies 1. Walking In seven search techniques. 2. Cold Calling I will discuss his seven briefly, but I tend to 3. Direct Mail group search methods 4. Completing Applications more broadly into four categories: Networking, 5. Responding to Job Ads Professional Recruiters, 6. Using Staffing Firms Advertisements, and 7. Networking Unsolicited ApplicationsHighly Effective Job Searching Orville Pierson
    4. 4. My Four Pillars of Job Searching 4UnsolicitedRecruitedAdvertisedNetworked
    5. 5. 34 Fulltime and Part-Time Job Search Successes 5 Unsolicted Unsolicted 21% Recruited Recruited 12% Advertised Advertised 38% Networked Networked 50% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%Add up to more than 100% because sometimes multiple methods used
    6. 6. 14 Fulltime Job Search Successes 6 Unsolicted Unsolicted 7% Recruited Recruited 21% Advertised Advertised 36% Networked Networked 57% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70%Add up to more than 100% because sometimes multiple methods used
    7. 7. 8 Fulltime Job Searches Last 15 Years 7 Unsolicted Unsolicted 0% Recruited Recruited 38% Advertised Advertised 0% Networked Networked 100% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 120%Add up to more than 100% because sometimes multiple methods used
    8. 8. Why networking matters 8 The most desirable employers hire more than 50% of their employees using referrals.  Hugh Owen, Chesapeake Bayline (Sep/Oct 2006 Vol 25 no. 1) An April 2001 study by the Society for Human Resource Management and Career-Journal showed that 95% of job seekers and HR professionals relied on networking to find jobs and candidates, respectively. The same study found that HR professionals used employee referrals, another form of networking, 91% of the time in hiring new candidates. In a 1999 career transition study done by human resources consulting firm Drake Beam Morin, 64% of the almost 7,500 people surveyed said they found their new jobs through networking. Technology has made networking even more dominant
    9. 9. Networking is the single most effective technique of job search 9  ―The majority of jobs are found through networking and the people you know. You have to be aggressive about leveraging your network.‖  Nicholas ‗Coach Nick‘ Papadopoulos, executive coach with New York City-based Sky‘s The Limit Corp. Data indicates that  Perhaps >80% of jobs are filled through some form of networking  People who find jobs by networking are happier with the job, and are likely to stay longer. HR professionals speculate that this is so because  Candidates have more info & make a better choice.Highly Effective Job Searching Orville Pierson
    10. 10. Manage Your Time 101. Looking for a job is almost like having a job--it requires plenty of time!2. Use that time effectively – emphasize the techniques that works best (Networking)  Don‘t ignore the others completely – just proportion correctly3. Also, guard against job search burnout by striking a good balance  If working full-time, need to put in at least 3 hours per week to (not including lunch networking) job searching to be ―active‖  If not working, put in at least 32 hours per week (including weekends) but no more than 50 hours per week – job search burnout can be a problem  No more than an hour per day searching jobsites / job agents on the internet (doesn‘t include time researching companies or emailing network)  Should include network lunches daily during the week
    11. 11. Researching Employers 11 WHY RESEARCH EMPLOYERSWHAT YOU WILL WANT TO KNOW SOURCES OF INFORMATION
    12. 12. Why Research Employers? 12 Discover more about specific industries, geographic regions, positions, organizations or institutions Identify employers that best match your skills, interests and values Determine how you could fit into a specific organization and help achieve its goals  Doing so will help you decide if you are truly interested in a particular organization or company. Demonstrate enthusiasm to interviewers  Having knowledge of a potential employer gives you a competitive advantage over other job-seekers Researching will also help you prepare for an interview.  Answer questions intelligently  Prepare and ask well-informed interview questions Make well-informed decisions about employment offers
    13. 13. Information to look for: 13 History of employer and  Leaders and staff industry  Profit or Non-profit Potential for growth  Management style and Will organization be organizational structure restructuring?  Number of employees Product/Services  Working climate and work Location(s) load Comparison to industry  Training and development trends opportunities Major competitors  Typical career path and Ownership of organization promotion policy Financial status  Technology
    14. 14. Employer Information Resources 14 Annual Reports  Local/Regional Library Company Web site  Professional Associations Current & Former Employees  Professional Journals Recruiters  Chambers of Commerce Newspaper Articles  Better Business Bureau Financial Newspapers &  Government Offices Publications  Company/Agency PR Materials  Charlotte Business Journal  Trade Associations /  American City Journals Organizations Online Directories  Religious Organizations  LinkedIn  Friends/Relatives  Glassdoor  School Placement Offices Special Directories  Annual Professional Magazine Directories
    15. 15. Networking 15THE ART AND THE MECHANICS OF GETTING TO KNOW STUFF THROUGH OTHERS
    16. 16. Networking Rules 16
    17. 17. My Five Rules of Networking 17
    18. 18. Rule #1: Build Your Well Before You‘re Thirsty 18 After You Meet Someone, Record it Somewhere – If you get their Card write the date and place on their business card and a note about something they need or would like based on your conversation. Maintain (and Backup) Your Searchable Database(s) of Contacts  Outlook  LinkedIn  Plaxo  CardScan  Excel  Synchronize with Blackberry / Phone Contact Lists  Professional Organizations  Conferences  Email (LinkedIn ―Grab‖ feature)
    19. 19. Where to Meet People 19 Have business lunches at least once a day while job searching. Attend free local events – check the Charlotte Business Journal; WFAE, etc. Figure out where your target market hangs out (online and offline). Then hang out there. Create your own regular ―business hangout,‖ like a coffee shop where you can regularly be found working, networking, reading or connecting with other professionals. Start your own online Group on LinkedIn
    20. 20. Rule #2: Tap Into Your Network to Help Others 20 Networking is Definitely NOT about getting something for nothing Some would say it‘s about Exchange – and you should bring something to the table I say it‘s about Giving  OfferYourself and Your Network as a Resource  Bring information to every meeting  Share information after every meeting
    21. 21. Giving Without Expectation 21 Approach networking with a What Can I Do For Others Attitude:  The basic principle is helping others without an expectation of receiving something in return  Give someone a key piece of information or assistance that will enable them to achieve their goal, complete their task or assist them in some way. Recognize leads for others, Take the initiative to promote others, Send articles and links that would be of interest to others ―Master Networkers give without remembering and receive without forgetting‖
    22. 22. Rule #3: Always Be Genuine and Respectful 22 Respect Time: Be early; don‘t over-run Respect Privacy: Only use contact‘s name with permission Keep your Commitments Be Honest  When Asked a Question – always be honest  No need to make the other person uncomfortable by sharing too much  No need to speak negatively, even if you feel negatively Networking is not about talking a lot, it‘s about listening a lot  When you do talk: Ask open ended questions  Take Notes – not just about what they can do for you, but what you can do for them
    23. 23. Rule #4: Be Prepared 23 Business Cards! – Currency of Networking (vistaprint.com) - No matter where you go – the mall, church, out to dinner, the gym – you should have at least five business cards with you. Have a pitch, a short ―brand statement‖ of who you are and what you‘re looking for Have a departure (exit) statement ready, but use it only if asked: focus forward, not back Have a written 1-page marketing plan to leave with your contact Ask for information, wait for them to volunteer contacts first – if it doesn‘t happen, ask for contacts ―who might know more‖ (not necessarily at the company) – do NOT ask for a job, or even a job lead. Bring a resume, but only provide it if it is asked for, and then only at the end
    24. 24. Rule #5: Follow up 24 Send Thank You letters (emails are okay) Keep your database updated Maintain long-term contact Close the Loop – Follow-up on all Leads
    25. 25. Excuses People Use NOT to Network 25 Networking is phony or manipulative -  Keep it Genuine Networking is designed to convince someone to do something they don‘t really want to do  People Don‘t Want to Be Used, but They Do Want to Help  People Don‘t Want to Feel Useless or Helpless – So Don‘t Ask For Things They Can‘t Give – Like a Job – It makes them Uncomfortable  Ask for what they can give without even realizing it – a lead Networking is selling myself  Yes – For Free – Which is Something We Call Giving Networking requires an extraverted style  Introverts Can Compensate – It Takes Energy But It IS Doable – I‘m an Introvert Networking is mostly done in large groups and requires spontaneity  Not True – Most of my networking occurs one on one and is planned Don‘t Need to Network to Find A Job  Data Says You Do Too much work  Now That‘s True – Networking IS WORK!
    26. 26. How do I start? 26Begin with the people you know well:  Relatives  Friends and neighbors  Your pastor, priest or rabbi  Current & former employers & co-workers  Colleagues from Professional Associations  People you meet in your every day activities  Hair Stylist, Dentist, Doctor  Your College‘s alumni
    27. 27. The Steps of Networking 271. Determine your goal (Target Companies / Employers)2. Decide who to talk to for your first wave of networking (Start with Your Inner Circle/General Contacts)3. Using the One Page Marketing Plan, you want to figure out what each of these people knows about your target industries and companies  Practice the approach by yourself and then with a friend, and then request a meeting4. Ask for 20-30 minutes, face-to-face - Ask to meet in a casual environment (coffee shop, restaurant, etc.)  Select an Appropriate Location – if at lunch, try to pick a less crowded, quieter place – perhaps early or late to miss the crowd – a coffee shop with free wireless can be a good choice5. Prepare & have the meeting6. Follow-up with a Thank-you
    28. 28. Putting the Plan in Action at the Location 28 Be Early, Shake Hands, Smile, Pay Attention To Your Body Language  75% of communication is nonverbal  People respect and respond to good eye contact, smiles, cordial voice tones, good posture, enthusiasm and well placed humor  People do judge you by your appearance  Offer to purchase a lunch or coffee or tea Unless you know they are familiar, briefly verbally describe your Pitch or ―Brand Statement‖  Education/Training (formal, informal)  Experience (paid, unpaid)  Knowledge/Skills/Competencies Then talk about your purpose for the meeting –  That you are exploring career ideas and opportunities  You have developed a kind of DRAFT marketing plan  You would like some input, some feedback If they ask, share your Positive Departure Message / Exit Statement, and let them know you are not rushing into job hunting, but are taking time to assess the market, so that you can make a move that is both secure and fits you well
    29. 29. Using the DRAFT One Page Take Notes of Marketing Plan This Slide 291) Invite them to look at a kind of DRAFT ―marketing plan‖ you are doing for yourself to see if they have any suggestions2) Walk them through plan‘s attributes, invite comment and take notes (write on your copy to assure them it is just a draft)  Ask questions about the industries you listed3) The core of what you want comes when you get them to the list of companies in each industry. Ask if there is: a) Any other company you should be considering?  If they volunteer a company, ask about the company  How is the company doing? How big is it? Where is it? How do they know about the company? If they don‘t offer, you can prompt by asking: ―Do you know someone who could provide me more info on the company?‖ but don‘t push if they decline or dodge. b) If they‘ve been helpful suggesting companies and contacts, ask about the companies you already had on the list: ―For any of the listed companies, is there anyone you could recommend who would know more about one of these companies?‖ c) Throughout this process you want to be taking notes, particularly writing down names – highlight these as you go. If they‘ve volunteered to put you in touch with anyone, at the end, review the entire list of contacts, and ask them who you can contact using their name.
    30. 30. Career Fairs 30TEND TO BE FOCUSED Specific Field or Company, Less Experienced, or Specific Skills
    31. 31. If You See Someone You Recognize But Don‘t Recall Their Name 31Don‘t say, ―I‘m sorry but I can‘t remember your name.‖If you blank on a name you have three choices: 1. Often times you will remember the topic you discussed with the person in your previous meeting with them: bring it up again as a sign of recognition. 2. Give your name first and say, ―Hi, I‘m John Buckley. We sat next to each other at the luncheon.‖ 3. Say with enthusiasm, ―I remember you: Tell me your name again.‖Once you have regained the person‘s name, if you are at a job fair or other meeting, remember to introduce this person to at least one other individual at the meeting to help retain this name in your memory.
    32. 32. Career Fairs 32 Be Focused Ask yourself what you want from the career fair:  Information about Openings in the Field or Company  Contacts for Fulltime or Temporary jobs  Job leads Be Prepared Know what organizations will be there. Plan and practice your Pitch and SOAR statements. Ask intelligent, meaningful questions. Bring ample resumes, notes, a zipper binder (with pockets for materials), and extra pens and paper for note taking.
    33. 33. Career Fairs 33 Get Your Business Cards Q S O A R Prepare Your Resumes Obstacle: Difficulty Prepare Your Brand Statement Results: Question Situation: Initial State Action: What You Did to Overcome Achievement or Accomplishm ent Prepare Your Departure Statement Task: Problem Prepare Your SOAR or STAR Stories Prepare Your Questions to trigger your SOAR or STAR stories Dress as you would for a formal interview Bring a Zipper Folder with a Notepad and pen holder, with a pen Arrive Early Use a firm handshake, exercise good eye contact, smile Be polite and helpful to other candidates Present your resume and indicate to the recruiter your purpose for attending the career fair Keep your hands free to take notes and shake hands Ask for a business card and company information
    34. 34. Follow Up 34 Keep notes on your conversations and how you said you would follow up by writing or calling. If no business card is available, ask if the recruiter can be reached at the telephone number or address on literature. Compose and type or hand write thank-you letters immediately - within two days at the most. Consider a short email thank you (in this age of iPhones and blackberries - not before you leave the fair) and then legible hand written note. If typing a formal thank you letter:  refer to date and location of the career fair, mention any unique or highly specific points discussed so the employer will remember you.  Any important information should be restated and emphasized.  Reiterate your qualifications and include any information you neglected to mention.  Proofread your letter and let someone else look it over.  You may want to include a copy of your resume.
    35. 35. Professional Recruiters 35 USING PEOPLE AND BEING USED, POLITELY
    36. 36. What five characteristics do recruiters look for in High Potential (Hi-Po) candidates? 361. Self-Starter2. Critical Thinker3. Energetic4. Excellent Communication Skills5. Motivated
    37. 37. What do Recruiters Recommend For Networking? 37 Executive search consultants credit a combination of networking and professional development as the most effective methods for getting attention and as key factors to success. They suggest executives:  Routinely build network outside company with business / industry / trade contacts  Actively develop leadership skills  Increase visibility/participation with industry groups  Continue to expand functional/technical expertise  Routinely network inside company to raise visibility
    38. 38. How Do I Form A Relationship With A Recruiter? 38 What some job-seekers don‘t realize is that these relationships are two-way interactions, and recruiters rely on information that only well-connected employees can provide. The insider information you hold is currency for search firm professionals, and when you schedule time with a recruiter take the "me" out of meeting and find out how you can best help to source business and referrals. If you want a recruiter to do something for you, you‘ll need to share what you are hearing about movements and growth within certain industries or companies. "I get emails from clients and candidates that say they have information about the industry. To establish trust, share some of the information you have — step up and show that you have something to offer. Build a relationship that recognizes the information highway is a two-way street — share, trade, and give stuff up to get what you want." Dave Dart, managing partner - - The Morisey-Dart Group, part of the MRINetwork.
    39. 39. Recruiters 39 Most are Contingency Based Some are Retained Search Either way, sending them an unsolicited resume is real low probability of success – don‘t waste much time blanketing recruiters with unsolicited resumes Do‘s: 1. Respond to appropriate Ads from Recruiters 2. Be gracious and helpful to Recruiters when they call – help them with their search, even if you‘re a good fit 3. Keep a LinkedIn profile and other posted resumes up to date
    40. 40. Professional Recruiters 40 Industry Focus Field Focus1. Power / Utilities 1. Attorneys2. Health Care 2. Accountants3. Environmental, Health, Saf 3. Engineers ety & Human Resources 4. Managers4. Oil & Energy 5. Quality Managers5. Manufacturing 6. Finance Managers6. Banking 7. Auditors7. Chemicals 8. Sales8. Plastics 9. Production Managers9. Petrochemical 10. Plant Managers10. Glass, Ceramics & Concrete 11. Technicians
    41. 41. Advertisements 41
    42. 42. Job Searching and the Internet 42 “I submitted my resume online but how do I know it was received?”  ―Chances are you wont‖  Perhaps biggest gripe jobseekers have today about applying online  Important to try and follow up with the company if possible “If the date posted on a job is more than a few weeks old should I still apply for it?”  ―Absolutely yes! There is no way to tell if the job has been filled … When in doubt, always apply‖
    43. 43. There are over 45,000 online job search sites. 43 Niche and CompanyBig General Sites Career Sites Monster.com  Beyond.com Indeed.com USA.gov  Ontargetjobs.com Careerbuilder.com Dice.com Linkup.com  Hound.com - $$ Hotjobs.com Simplyhired.com  Execu-search.com Craigslist.com Jobcentral.com  Energycentraljobs.com Jobserve.com Jobster.com Oodle.com  Energyjobsnetwork.com Snagajob.com Theladders.com  iHireUtilities.com Trovix.com Tweetmyjobs.com  iHispanic.com USAjobs.com  Idealist.com
    44. 44. How to Use The Mega Job Ad Sites 441. Post a Resume on Each Site2. Set Up Appropriate RSS or Job Agents and Have Them Send Results to a Job-Search-Only Email Address3. Review the Job Agents for Good Prospects  Resist the Urge to Repeatedly Check the Actual Websites  Spend about 1 hour per day reviewing the Job Agents and Any sites that don‘t offer Job Agents – police yourself – it is tempting to keep looking  Once you‘ve identified the best prospects (prioritize those that you can identify the employer) for the day, spend another hour applying  See if you can find the same ad on the employer‘s website – if so it often has more info, and you are more likely to have your resume viewed if it came through the company channel (and it may look better)  Consider sending a snail mail follow-up for particularly interesting opportunities
    45. 45. Indeed.com 45Indeed works as anaggregator for listingsfrom major job Websites, company Websites, associations, andother online sources.Unfortunately often hasrepeated listings.Its Job Trends graphicsare one of its bestfeatures.
    46. 46. 46Charlotte Job Ad GrowthPosted on InternetRelative to January 2005
    47. 47. Energy Job Trends from Indeed 47% of All Job Ads Relative to Jan 2005
    48. 48. Unsolicited Applications 48 POST RESUMES TARGET MAILINGS
    49. 49. Posting Resumes 49 PASSIVE
    50. 50. Getting Searched 50 Still New Tools for Employers  Software manufacturer had operations management position to fill 1. Posted help-wanted ad to several online job boards, directing candidates to apply at Company‘s internal careers site, which uses applicant- tracking software 2. Used separate program to search job sites for resumes of candidates who met general criteria for job but hadn‘t applied  Process yielded ~700 resumes – 150 from direct applicants and rest from scouring job boards for previously posted resumes  Using applicant-tracking software, Company was able to identify top 10 candidates in ~20 minutes  After telephone interviews, top two candidates were brought in for interviews, one of whom was hired  Whole process took 15 days, compared to previous 8-12 weeks
    51. 51. ―For Some, Online Persona Undermines Resume‖ 51 When small Chicago consulting Co was looking to hire summer intern, Co president went online to check on promising candidate who had just graduated from U of Illinois  At Facebook, found web page that described candidate‘s interests as ―smokin‘ blunts,‖ shooting people, and obsessive sex, all described in vivid slang  Candidate was toast  ―What kind of judgment does this person have?‖ Organizations are looking for ‗red flags‘ A university student‘s Facebook picture showed student holding a beer with two beer cans balanced on her head  Interests: ―going to bars, drinking beer, drinking whiskey, drinking any alcohol, partying with my friends, beer pong, beer bonging, drinking games with cards or any we make up randomly, so pretty much anything that involves drinking‖
    52. 52. Protecting Your Online Persona 52 Don‘t post anything on social networking sites that you wouldn‘t want prospective Employer to see If your network offers the option, consider setting your profile to ―private‖  If you can‘t control what other people say on your profile site, consider using the ―block comments‖ feature Check your profile regularly to see what comments have been posted  Use a search engine to look for online records of yourself to see what is out there  And if you find detrimental info, see about getting it removed
    53. 53. Target (Direct) Mailings 53 ASSERTIVE
    54. 54. Strategies 54 Look for Opportunities to Network in First Conduct extensive research on the organization Visit the organization‘s website and check for an employment page Send tailored resumes and cover letters of inquiry
    55. 55. Review and Conclusion 55
    56. 56. Job Searching is A Continuous Cycle 56
    57. 57. Contact Info 1 Goal Position 8 -10 Skills 57 1 Pitch 4-5 Fields 20 Job Titles Develop Your DRAFT Restrictions 1-Page Marketing Plan as a Living Working 4-5 Industries Document40-45 Companies
    58. 58. Develop 10 SOAR Stories and Questions to Trigger Them 58Q S O A R Obstacle: Difficulty Action: Results: Situation:Question What You Did to Achievement or Initial State Overcome Accomplishment Task: Problem
    59. 59. Tailor Each Resume and Keep It! 59AND USE THE PROPERTIES META-DATA TO ASSOCIATE THE JOB AD
    60. 60. Keep Your Contact and Job Progress Up to Date and BACK THEM UP! • Everyone in all of your contact Database 60 databases (email, LinkedIn, personal address book, Plaxo, etc.). • Usually about 150, but no more than Network 250 - These are the people who would return your phone calls! • ~25-40 people who know you well Inner Circle enough to offer advice worth listening to on your career • ~5 people who are in the best position Board of Advisors to critically advise you on job decisions • The people you can lean on, vent to Close Friends & Family (pick one – not a spouse), and escape with
    61. 61. Remember To Use All Four Pillars of Job Search 61
    62. 62. Remember My Rules For Networking 62
    63. 63. Set Goals and Track Your Progress 63 Activity Actual Number Weekly GoalsJob Ad Contact 0 0 0 0 1Search Firm Contact 0 0 0 0 1Common Network Contact 20 20 20 20 19Target Employer Ordinary Contact 5 5 5 5 5Target Employer Peer Contact 1 1 1 1 1Target Employer Hiring Manager 0 1 0 1 1Target Employer Above Hiring 0 0 1 0 1ManagerFollow-ups with Hiring Manager or 0 0 0 0 1Above
    64. 64. I Am Available For Questions 64 WWW.LINKEDIN.COM/IN/JOHNBUCKLEY Take Note of This Profile

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