THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW
Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Busine...
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The Entrepreneurs Radio Show 069 Barrie Davenport

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The Entrepreneurs Radio Show 069 Barrie Davenport

  1. 1. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 1 of 21 EPISODE #69: BARRIE DAVENPORT On this episode, Barrie interviews successful entrepreneur and well-known coach Barrie Davenport. The creator of Live Bold and Bloom, Barrie aims to inspire and develop your confidence in facing life‟s challenges as well as in today‟s economy. Travis and Barrie shared a lot of interesting ideas and views on how to discover, develop, and cultivate your passion in your business. Barrie also gives valuable insight on how to discover your passion through tips like making sure it coincides with your values and priorities in life, experimentation and learning from others to see if it‟s a perfect fit for you, as well as pursuing that passion through adapting to your current situation. These are just some of the things would inspire entrepreneurs to pursue their passion and dreams in creating a thriving business. Barrie Davenport- using passion to grow your business Travis: Hey, it's Travis Lane Jenkins, welcome to episode number 69 of the Entrepreneur's Radio Show, a production of Rockstar Entrepreneur Network. It's just me and you, and our wonderful guest today. Sandra's still on the road travelling abroad as she does often. Our guest today is Barrie Davenport. Now, Barrie created Live Bold and Bloom, and she offers practical, realistic strategies to push you out of your comfort zone and she challenges you to shift your thinking and take a forward action so that you can live a fearless life and live more. Now we talked about a lot of great things in this episode. Just in case you just started listening, what I like to do is I like to do the interview first and then I'll come back and do the intro so that I know what I'm talking about rather than discussing what's in their bio. And we really went deep on several of the elements that it takes to get crystal clear on what your passion is and then take action and move forward with it. And I also went deep on several different reasons or stumbling blocks that stand in your way from ever reaching those levels of passion. So there's a lot of great stuff that we cover in this interview. Now, before we get started I want to remind you to be sure and stay with us until the very end if you can because I've got a question for you. And I'd like to share a little inspiration with you. Also, I have a challenge for you, so you'll have to stay tuned until the very end to hear what that is. So, without further ado, let's get down to the good stuff. Welcome to the show Barrie. Barrie: Well, thank you so much for having me. It's a great pleasure Travis. Travis: I am honored to have you here. Hey, I have a question for you, I don't know if you're familiar with the format of the show but what we like to do is before we talk about what you teach and what
  2. 2. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 2 of 21 you've discovered, do you mind giving us the back story on how you got to where you're at today and why you're doing what you're doing? Barrie: Sure, I'd love to give the story, it's an interesting story. I was in public relations for most of my professional career, and then stopped for a while to have children. And then when my oldest child got to be a teenager she made a decision that she really wanted to pursue a professional career as a ballet dancer. So I sort of put a lot of things on hold and was driving her back and forth 60 miles round trip from our suburban home in Atlanta to downtown Atlanta so she could train. So I focused a lot of my time and attention on helping her achieve her life passion, and then when she went off and did her thing, I had a lot more time on my hands to go back to my career and I could not do it, I simply could not get myself ramped up again for promoting other people's goods and services. Even though I had a great career and I loved it at the time but something had switched inside of me. And so that launched me on a personal search and it happened kind of late in life. I was 48 when I went through all of this, and I didn't know what I was doing and just sort of fumbled along, I took a lot of assessments, went to workshops, and read a lot. And coaching and counseling kept coming up for me over and over as careers that sort of match my inner self. And I did a lot of research from both of them and ultimately decided to go back to school yet my coaching certification and start a coaching business, which I did. And it just was a beautiful fit, I loved the interaction with people and helping people move forward. And then as part of my coaching business, I started a small blogger blog to promote my business and then discovered a love of blogging and writing, and creating courses. And then suddenly I had this huge online business that was part of my coaching world and actually has sort of become the main part of my business now. So, whereas 4 years ago I was a housewife driving my daughter back and forth to dance. Now, I'm an online expert helping other people do the same thing and helping them find their passions. Travis: And so, now you said coaching and what else? Barrie: An online expert, I'm working online-- Travis: Oh, just, okay, all right. Barrie: Yes, yeah. Helping people develop your own online businesses as well as uncover what their life passions are and aligning the two. So it's been a really wonderful transition, I've just found an area that I didn't even know existed before. Travis: Well, I'm curious. So, it's interesting, by the age of 48, had you ever thought of becoming self- employed, being an entrepreneur? Barrie: Well, I was self-employed in my PR consultancy. I've worked for agencies and corporations before, and then when I had children I started a consultancy. But it was really hard to take it super
  3. 3. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 3 of 21 seriously when you're trying to raise three children. You know, my main goal was to get them up and out, and so, yes I had but I certainly had no thought of starting one that was almost a 100% online. Travis: Well, now correct me if I'm wrong, it sounds like, really when you were self-employed you were more of like a subcontractor, right. Barrie: Well, yes and no, I mean I worked on my own, I was a solo contractor, yes, and that‟s what I did. Travis: And I think that's very different because you're basically performing work for someone on a kind of a performance basis, whereas, becoming a full-on entrepreneur is you create the opportunities and you produce the opportunities at the same time which is very different than being a contractor, right. Barrie: Yes, I agree absolutely. And there's a huge emotional difference there as well. Travis: Well yeah, the one hasn't that and one doesn't. Barrie: Well, there's that, yes, but also just a difference in passion just makes me feel so alive to know that I'm building this business from scratch, I'm creating things, I'm creating courses, I'm creating books, and I'm doing it all. And helping people at the same time, man, that really jazzes me. Travis: Well, one of the things that I see about the two different models also is-- And I've talked about this often is, so the first model is really kind of a trade in your time for money, and the second one is scalable by not necessarily just trading your time for your money but doing other things that allow you to reach many, a large number of people through the process of duplication, is that accurate? Barrie: Absolutely. I mean, the ability to have multiple strings of income is amazing and it allows me to do a wide variety of things and still have money coming on, on something I did 2 years ago. Travis: Right. Now, I'm close to your age, I'm 47 and we're from an era-- When my first business, and me and my wife were laughing the other day because a guy was typing on a typewriter and I said, "Do you remember when we used to do proposals on typewriters?" You know, we're old enough to remember that, right. Barrie: Yeah, for sure. Travis: And so it's very uncommon for people of our generation to be really up on technology. Do you agree with that? Barrie: Yes, absolutely. In fact I would say even for our generation I was way behind when I first started.
  4. 4. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 4 of 21 Travis: Wow, I understand the impact of what that means because the mountain just gets twice as tall when you don't have all of these skill sets to-- In this day and age, you need to be incredibly proficient in a lot of different things, do you agree? Barrie: Yes, absolutely. Travis: You know, whereas, one of my first business in straight in 1991, I found a need and my god I'm going to fill it. Barrie: Good for you, that's great. Travis: And with some time and some effort we filled it but there's a whole lot more business acumen that comes in to being able to start things up, and not that I want to dissuade anybody from doing it but you have to have a mash-up, a combination of skills. So how did you overcome all of those issues in such a short period of time? Barrie: That's a great question, and the main thing that did it for me was passion for what I was doing. I so loved the work that I was doing, I so love the online community, I so loved being able to interact with people all over the world and the people I was meeting and the things and ideas that we were sharing. And I so wanted to be a part of it that I made myself learn it, and when I hit a roadblock I found somebody who could help me, or I hire somebody who could help me. And I just follow through, and I think all of us are smart enough to figure these things out but we have to have a good reason, we're pushing through the things that we don't like, or the things that scare us. And for me that good reason was I love the work, I loved what I was doing. And then once you learn it, it's not nearly as intimidating or as scary as you think it's going to be. Travis: Oh, I agree with you. You know what, I'd once went to an event and I'm notorious for not being able to sit still, because I'm on fire with what I'm doing, I mean I'm literally on fire, I can't sit still and that's my passion right. Barrie: Right. Travis: And that's what you're talking about, and so that passion allows you to put in hours and focus and effort that very few people can match because you're so on fire with that passion, or at least that's how it works for me. Is that a fair representation of how it works for you also? Barrie: It is, I had heard the expression before that when you feel passionate about what you're doing that your work feels like play. And that's what it felt like to me, it felt like I was getting up in the morning and doing this fun stuff that I really enjoy doing. And then I'd see this little ding in my computer that said
  5. 5. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 5 of 21 you've got money. And I'd be, "Wow, I got paid today for doing what I love to do." It truly does feel that way. Travis: Right. I think a lot of people assign that, and this is my assumption based on listening to other people. I think a lot of people believe that that's a funny, witty, little slogan, or saying, or something when there's an incredible amount of truth in that. Barrie: Absolutely, there is truth in it, and I don't think you really appreciate it until you experience it, until you feel it and you know, god, I feel so grateful that I'm able to something I feel so happy doing. Travis: Right. Okay, 4 years ago you're the housewife and you're doing all of the things that are required of you in that and you make the shift. How long before you start finding success in what you're doing? Barrie: Well, I guess it depends on how you define success. For me, getting my first comment on a blog post felt like a huge success, and then getting my first PayPal payment felt like a huge success. So every step along the way felt like a success to me because I just felt so happy that I was doing all of these things. But I think in terms of how long did it take me to make a livable income, it took about 2 years to make a decent enough income to say, "Yeah, I could live off of this." Travis: So, now, walk me through how you go from what your life was when you decided to become an entrepreneur to teaching people how to uncover their true passion. Connect those lines for me. Barrie: Yeah, well, the beginning of course was deciding to become a coach and learning so much about helping people live their dreams basically, helping people move forward with what they really want to do in life but they're stuck and they don't know how to do that. And I started my first blog called liveboldandbloom.com, and it was a general personal development blog but I talk a lot about passion on that site and helping people push past fear and push past those limitations that they have inside of themselves, and sort of embrace being fearless to do things that they wouldn't normally do. And I wrote about a lot of other things too and I continue to do that, but I found that passion was a topic that people were very interested in. So I eventually spun off onto another site that's named after me, BarrieDavenport.com and that's totally devoted to helping people uncover and live their life passions. And I've written a book about that called The 52-Week Life Passion project, and a course called The Path to Passion. So through those different products and through my articles, that's where I focus my attention on helping people with their passion. And it was just over a period of time that just day in, day out, sitting down at my desk at 7 o'clock in the morning, getting up at 6 or 7 in the evening and just busting my butt. Travis: And so, do you subscribe to the school of thought that find a hobby that you love and find a way to make a living, or is passion found somewhere deeper into that. Let me do a better job of explaining.
  6. 6. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 6 of 21 So let's say that you have a business that provides a service, and maybe it's not a service that you're passionate about, but you're passionate about doing a great job being a leader in the industry, being the best, creating a great experience. Can you change the focus of what your passion is or does it have to be centric on some hobby that you're passion about. Does that make sense? Barrie: Yeah, it does. I don't think passion can be confined in any of those parameters necessarily. I think it differs both in its expression and its manifestation for each individual person. Everyone has something inside of them that longs to be expressed. It's a part of their personality, a part of their aptitudes and skills, it's a part of what they just deeply desire. Some people had never had the opportunity to express that or even to tap into it because, for a wide variety of reasons. Whether it's because they were pushed in different directions by parents or they never felt self-confident enough to really pursue what they wanted to pursue. There's so many reasons why people get away from their passions or never find them. Most adults find themselves in the position in life at some point where they say, "Am I doing what I really want to do, am I being the person I really want to be?" And sometimes we are in situations in life where we can't make an automatic change, we can't say, "Gosh, I really want to be a writer," but you got this full time career as an attorney, so you can't just dump that. There's so many practical obligations that you have. Travis: Right. Barrie: So what I teach people is to first find the thing that you love. Don't think about any of the limitations. Find the thing you love, and I have a whole series of steps that I take people through to help them find the thing they love, and once you find that thing, then take a look at your life now and see what you're willing to shift, how you're willing to fit that passion into your life where it can fit logically. What you're willing to maybe change and adapt in your life, look at your different relationships, maybe your spouse or your children, how will they be impacted and how can you communicate this with them and help them to support you in your passion. Ideally it would be through your work because people spend so much time in their work that if they're passionate about their work they're going to be passionate 8-12 hours a day. But some people can't do that so I advise find passion in some aspect of your life, whether it's through an avocation, or volunteer situation, or some side project you're doing. And as long as you have a little bit of passion in your life it's going to positively impact everything. And once you got your foot in the door you'll find that opportunities seem to present themselves to you. That was the short answer. Travis: Okay. So maybe your-- Let's draw a scenario, say you're 40 years old and you're 20 years into a career as an attorney maybe, 17 years into a career as an attorney to continue this example that you used. And you're thinking, "This is no longer a good use of my time. I don't care about it, I'm not passionate about it. I'm interested in this passion." So you're saying rather than making an instant shift, start with something small and build from there. Am I understanding this right?
  7. 7. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 7 of 21 Barrie: Yes. Well, if you were extremely wealthy and you can afford to make an instant shift and you have savings that will last you for several years, then by all means, make the shift. That's how very lucky and fortunate position to be in. But most people aren't in that position, most people have to transition from one place to the next. So maybe it is you have to, if the lawyer's passion happens to be writing. Well, a perfect example of this is the guy who wrote the book The Kite Runner, do you know that book? Travis: No, I haven't heard of that. Barrie: Yeah. Khaled Hosseini, it's a best-selling book, he's written several, and he was a medical doctor. That was his profession, and on the side he wrote. And his first novel won all kinds of awards since it's so great, that he was able to transition out of being a doctor and become a full-time writer, which was really his passion. So most people do have to have that transition period, they do something on the side that they love and the opportunity kind of present themselves because other people are attracted to a passionate person. So, let's say you're volunteering to do something and people notice you and offers come your way. And then the other logical thing is you start saving money. So you save money so that you can afford to quit your job as an attorney and keep the kids going to school, and the bills paid, and that sort of thing. Travis: Right. Well, you know it's interesting, that parallel's exactly how I did it as a young man. Now, at 24 years old I decided that what I was doing was killing me. Barrie: Right. Travis: I felt like a caged animal. Barrie: What were you doing? Travis: I was working at a company where we did phone solicitation. Barrie: Ooh. Travis: Right. And I actually made a lot of money doing, I was good at the sales part, right. Barrie: Right. Travis: And I told my girlfriend at that time, I said, "I can't take this. This is killing me." I was raised in construction, I'm happiest when I'm outside, I'm going to, you know-- And so I started thinking about what I could do that could make me happy and I decided to start my own construction business. And so I went in to the office and I told all of the people I work with, I said, "A year from today, May 1st, I'm going to quit." And everyone laughed at me. And 8 months went by and I reminded them and they said,
  8. 8. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 8 of 21 "Oh, you're serious about this aren't you?" And we'd been saving, and we just did without, and sure enough when May 1st come around I quit and I started my business. And so I took the exact steps that you're talking about to make that shift. Now it's easier when you're young man and you don't have very many bills, and I think that that was good fortune for me as I made the jump when I was a young man. Barrie: Well, you also did something really, really important that not a lot of people do and I want to commend you for it, and that is you made yourself accountable publicly. You stated your goal, you gave yourself a reasonable amount of time to accomplish it, and you let the people around you know what your intentions were. And I think that's buys a ton of power and motivation to move you forward towards your goal. Travis: Right. I knew that it wouldn't let me back out. Barrie: Right. Travis: Because I don't want to be liar, I don't want to lose my credibility, and so I knew that I was painting myself in a corner. Barrie: Right, and that's huge. Any kind of accountability that way and as you said, painting yourself in a corner. I think that is a really important motivating factor to get people to make difficult change. Travis: Yeah, and I'd never really even thought about that until I was listening to the way that you broke this down. So what I was jotting down, I got right at 5 things that you felt like needed to be done to find your passion, and so I got three and I'm going to read them back to you just to make sure that, A, I'm doing a good job of listening. And, B, that we're crystal clear on your points, okay. Barrie: Okay. Travis: So the first is find what you're passionate about. Barrie: Right. Travis: And then the second is figure out how you can fit it in to your life. Did I understand that correctly? Barrie: Yes, that's correct. Travis: Okay. And then the third is figure out how you can adapt your situation so that, that becomes a reality, is that correct? Barrie: Yes.
  9. 9. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 9 of 21 Travis: Okay. Barrie: And of course there are hundreds, there are thousands of steps for each of those different points that you just illustrated or just mentioned. I mean there are thousand things that had to be done, and I know people listening to that will probably think of that's a lot easier said than done. The identifying the passion part is actually often the most difficult part for people. You know, a lot of people don't know what they're passionate about because they have been living this illusion for so long, you know, going through the motion of doing what they think they should be doing or doing what they're stuck doing and they just haven't taken the time to do the self-work that's required in finding your passion. Travis: Right. Well, I think what happens in my experience is the first set of questions create the subset of questions that go with them. And so maybe the first 5 questions or 10 questions are the hundred-foot view of something and then as you get closer it gets more granular. If it's a picture you can see the shape of their eyes, you can see all of those other intricate elements. And this is how when I mentor people, we break every task down into large items and then we break it down into as granular as possible and start marking each of those steps off. And my intuition is that's the same thing that you do. Barrie: Absolutely. Yeah, it absolutely is. It feels completely overwhelming and somewhat obscure and nebulous to talk about find your passion. Well, they're not too many force books on how to find your passion, or instructions manuals, or courses. People have no idea where to begin with that. So you do have to break it down and you have to make it digestible in a way that people can logically understand. Travis: Yeah. They almost sounds like a bumper sticker, you know, find your passion. Barrie: It does, it probably is a bumper sticker. Travis: They were not showing our age because do you see bumper stickers anymore? I don't. Barrie: No, I guess I don't. I see magnetized things now. Travis: Yeah, exactly. Okay, so we've got three, what were the next two that I missed? Barrie: Well, the next two. I would say the first two I would start even before the „go find your passion‟, and the first thing that I advise people to do when they are trying to do something that they love or they want to feel fulfilled, they want to have that energy and enthusiasm that you and I talked about earlier, is to make the commitment to the time of finding your passion. And I know that sounds just so simple but if you don't say, "I am going to allot X amount of time every week to this task,” then it will never get done. And you have to make it a non-negotiable in your life, otherwise you're just going to keep doing the same thing, you're going to work, you're going to come home, eat dinner, watch TV, go to bed, and
  10. 10. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 10 of 21 get up and do the same thing day in and day out. And if you don't commit that time it's just not going to happen. Travis: Makes perfect sense to me. Barrie: Yeah. And there's literal work that has to be done on this. Another few steps I take people through is getting really clear on some of the qualities that make up who they are through personality assessments, learning more about their intelligence type, learning more about how they are creatively adapted to the world. Looking at all the skills they have and then identifying the skills that they actually like because so many of us have skills that we're good at but we don't like them. Travis: Right. Barrie: So you don't want to focus your career or your passion around those. And then a huge piece of this is identifying your core values, which are those principles that guide your life, principles that if you are living against them you feel kind of icky and out of balance. And you use those core values and I ask people to narrow it down to 5 or 6 that are really the guiding principles and use those as the benchmark for making all of your decisions around what you want to do, with your passion or with your life. For example if you're passionate about, or if one of your values say is family and you have a passion of having a particular job that requires you to travel, well that's going to go against your value of family because you're not going to be home with your family enough. So you have to measure your passions against those all-important values. And then experimentation is a huge part of uncovering your passion because we really don't know whether or not we're passionate about something until we become engaged in it. You can't know that until you know the day in and day out process of what is involved in your passion. And that doesn't mean you have to commit to a full-time job with something that you're not completely sure about, that you put your toe in the water up, whether it's shadowing someone or doing it on a volunteer basis, or interviewing people who are already doing that position well. But it's not until we have some level of proficiency and engagement in the thing that interest us do we really develop the passion for it. Travis: Right. Barrie: Those are all sort of the preamble to finding your passion. Travis: Yeah, I agree with you and something that I found and I even have to relearn this lesson at times. I may have a preset of steps in my mind that need to happen, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and actually there are steps in between A, B, C, D, E, F, G that I didn't see, right. Barrie: Yeah.
  11. 11. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 11 of 21 Travis: And so I didn't know that until I started moving in that direction, yet the more I take those little steps, and this is what I hear you saying, okay. Shadowing somebody that's an expert, doing it, allocating one hour a day or two hours a day, you get more and more clarity. And for long a series of steps start adding up and you reach kind of this tipping point, you know, how you spend your time. You're spending your time a certain way, it feeds on itself, it feeds on ideas, it feeds on thoughts, you go to sleep. For me I noodle on it, I think about it, I spend 30, 45 minutes recounting the day and going over everything and it's me processing and moving one step closer to accomplishing what that is or at least getting a level of clarity in what that picture looks like. Is the same thing true for you? Barrie: Yes, absolutely, I think it does take time and experience to gain that clarity. For example, when I finally decided that I was going to go back to school, I didn't really know a 100% that I was going to be passionate about coaching. Everything, all my research and reading and thinking had led me to that point. But I don't think we ever handed a 100% certainty, guarantee, saying you have found it. I think you have to make that leap of faith at some point and give it a shot. So I did by popping down money for a year-long course and it wasn't until maybe midway through the program that I thought, "Wow, this is really great. I can see how I am really adapted for this kind of work." And then it wasn't until started the practice of coaching, built my own practice that I really started feeling engaged in the work and then started the blog and then felt even more passionate. So, sort of like pulling a thread in a way. If you like what you see you keep pulling and then you keep pulling and you get further and further into it. And one day you wake up and you think, "I think I found my passion, I feel happy everyday waking up about what I'm about to do." It rarely hits you over the head, it's usually a process as you said. Travis: Yeah, it's fascinating to me that I'm the authority on myself and yet I'm still a puzzle to myself on many levels. Barrie: That's what makes life exciting. Travis: Yeah. And frustrating at times, I'm thinking, "Come on, I know myself better than anybody else. I should know these answers." It starts you down a path of self-discovery. And one of the things, I was raised in a very, very rough neighborhood and so I think that was positive for me because it taught me how to survive at a very tough environment. Barrie: Right. Travis: And I'm a big guy now but I wasn't a big guy when I was a kid. Barrie: Right. Travis: I was a little bitty.
  12. 12. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 12 of 21 Barrie: Uhuh. Travis: And so, I had to learn to deal with fear early on and I grew to despise fear. And that spurned me to take more and more risk and change things up and continue to look for something different. And now, as a young man that could be very dangerous. As I got older and fortunately made it through some very poor decisions that started paying dividends for me because I would constantly be willing to step into a new space that I didn't know. Barrie: Right. Travis: And scare myself. And when most people have the natural reaction of turning and running. I had been preconditioned to hate fear and so I'd stand there and take it just in spite of the fact that I wasn't going to let fear control me, right. Barrie: Good for you. Travis: And so I think in a crazy way, a very negative environment worked for me, does that make sense? Barrie: It does, yeah it does, and I think that there's two kinds of fear. Growing up in a negative environment, you literally had that fight or flight fear, you had those tigers and bears chasing you-- Travis: Right. Barrie: Because somebody could have whooped your behind, right, hurt you bad. Travis: Right. Barrie: So that's one very legitimate kind of fear, and being able to stand up in the face of that legitimate fear is pretty courageous. And then there's the other kind of fear that is more insidious I think, the kind of fear that most of us live with and that is just the fear of our own shadows, the fear of limiting beliefs, the fear of negative thinking. I don't know if you have heard of Byron Katie, a writer who talks a lot about how fears are illusions and that most of the time if you challenge the fear you'll find that it doesn't hold any substance whatsoever, or if it has any truth to it, it's much less than what you feared it would be and much more manageable. And so most of the time when we act in spite of our fears or challenge ourselves to do something that we're afraid of, once we do it, once we take that first step, we realize that it's never ever as bad as we think it's going to be. Travis: Right. Yeah, I'm familiar. Not on a deep level but I'm familiar with some of the topics that you're talking about and I don't even know if that-- Is that a man or a woman?
  13. 13. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 13 of 21 Barrie: It's a woman. It's funny first name but yeah, it's Byron Katie. Travis: Yeah, in passing I've heard of those topics that she talks about but I've read on it very deep through other people. And so being able to stand in the presence and like you said, a lot of times that big bad wolf has not nearly as big and bad as you thought it's was going to be, and even I've accomplished some very incredible things especially from where I come from but I still have occasional negative things and natural fears that come up, and that surprises a lot of people and I've had conversations with fellow entrepreneurs and they're surprised. They think at some level that stops and it never stops. Barrie: Well, I think when you're super successful; one of the obvious fears that come up is staying on top. And when you reach a certain level it feels like you have a lot farther to fall, and a lot more to be embarrassed about, a lot more face to say. I think that's the struggle for a lot of really successful people is that they've got to keep that success going and that's a scary thing. But when you are so in love with what you're doing and if you're trying to do your work, highly focused in the present moment, I think it makes those fears dissipate to a certain degree. Travis: Right. Barrie: Because I'm sure when you're out there doing your thing with your business and you're working directly with someone or doing something that's engaging your mind, you're not really thinking about those fearful things. You're doing the work and loving it. Travis: Yeah, you're in the state of flow. Barrie: Yup, that's it. Travis: And I'm not cognizant of what it is or is not as much as I am in the moment. Barrie: Yeah, and that in the moment experience is the peak experience for living your passion. Travis: Now, I go to a lot of big events and at times, now I'm an outward person, I have a radio show, I talk to a lot of people, but even at times it's overwhelming for me. And I think, "Wow, if this overwhelming at times for me and I'm outgoing, what is it for people that are not outgoing?" At times I just want to crawl back in my bed in my room and just, you know. Barrie: Absolutely, and do you mean the public persona part, the public speaking, and-- Travis: Well, just mixing and mingling in a room full of 800 people, and all of those things. Not even necessarily on the stage. Just interacting and all of the other stuff when you're in large groups of
  14. 14. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 14 of 21 people, it requires a whole level of, requires a skill set and focus that you've got to be completely present to do. Barrie: Yes, you can, and I also have found, as I've gotten older, I have less tolerance for those things myself just because being in large crowds of people and having all of that attention and energy focus your direction is very draining. And you need time to refuel, at least I do. I'm more of an introvert and I know that I need, once I do an event like that I need time to go back and spend time on my own in a quiet space and refuel my mind and my heart, and get back in that focused place again. Travis: Yeah, well I spend 85% of my work hours alone thinking, writing, whatever. Barrie: Right. Travis: And so I'm like you, I love to reflect, and thought, and expand ideas, and study, and the complete opposite of what I was when I was a young man. And I'm at my best when I'm doing that. I'm rethinking when I say that. I'm at my best when I'm with people also but there's a big part of me that likes to spend the time alone just like what you were talking about. But I struggle to balance. I guess the reason why I'm sharing that is the whole reason why we created the show is I feel like success in business is not represented in a fair, honest light. Barrie: Right. Travis: I think most people are held up to levels of perfection like look how smart and brilliant these people are, or I am, which is meant to sell products and help teach people, and I think what it does is de-incentivize people more because they think, "Wow, I could never measure up to that." Barrie: Yes, that's right. Travis: And that frustrates me and so I would really rather the whole truth come out and we double the amount of entrepreneurs in the game of providing services that matter, or products. Barrie: Well-- Travis: So that everybody knows that it's okay to be afraid or to feel stupid, or to be lost, or whatever and it's normal. Barrie: It's very normal and I also, what you were just saying about people looking at other people who are successful and say, "I could never do that, or I could never be that." And one of the beautiful things that I'm seeing in MySpace online is so many entrepreneurs who are redefining what success means to them and how and why they want to work. And success for a lot of these people that I admire so much and now it's becoming for me as well as very little to do with the amount of money I make or the
  15. 15. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 15 of 21 amount of things I can afford to buy. Although, you know, money is important but it has more to do with the quality of life, with the balance that you can achieve with the joy that you have in your work, with the relationships you have with the ability to have experiences that are fulfilling and meaningful. And the cherry on the cake for passionate work in my mind is having passionate work that fulfills some sense of purpose, some sense of greater purpose for you whether it's serving people through building homes for them or serving people through some creative endeavor, or serving people through being a coach. But something where you feel like you are adding to rather than diminishing your space on earth here. Travis: Yeah, I agree with you. Barrie: Yeah, and so that's success to me, being able to do those things, and you don't need a ton of money to be able to do those things, really. I think I read somewhere that $75,000 a year is sort of the diminishing point of return for happiness that if you make a lot less than that you're going to be struggling and that's going to impact your happiness. But making a lot more than that doesn't necessarily make you any happier. You got enough money with $75,000 a year that you'll be able to live a comfortable life and do a lot of the things that you want to do. Travis: Right. Barrie: And I thought that was very interesting. So it's not a requirement to be rich, to be successful. Travis: Yeah, I agree. Doing things on your own terms and so your terms can vary with each individual that we're talking to, right. Barrie: Absolutely. Travis: So let's flip this over on the other side. What are the top 4, 5 things that you feel like people do that prevent them from getting to a place of happiness with their career, or their business, or whatever. Barrie: Well, I think the number one is the fear factor that we talked about before and really deceiving yourself about those limiting beliefs that you have inside. Because I think if you take time to really examine the limitations that you think you have, you really don't have them, and if you challenge them you'll see that you can overcome them. I was so afraid of technology, I didn't even know what URL meant when I first started really and truly I didn't. That's embarrassing to admit but it's true. Travis: Right. Barrie: And if I can push past that I know anyone out there listening can figure out what they need to figure out. So that's the first thing, is getting past those stories and those limitations. I think finding support is a huge thing as well. Finding both a tribe of people who are like minded, who can inspire you for doing some of the things that you want to do, accomplishing what you want to accomplish, so that
  16. 16. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 16 of 21 you are surrounding yourself by people who lift you up rather than pull you down. Having a mentor's an amazing way to propel yourself forward with somebody who really is invested in what you're doing and wants to help you get ahead. Travis: I agree. Barrie: Or coach, or council, or whatever you need, to move forward. I think being financially responsible is another big factor, you know. If you are spending money mindlessly, if you are not aware of what you are bringing in and putting out, you don't have a good grasp when your finances, then you need to do that. There's a great book out there called The Total Money Makeover for anyone who needs some help with saving and paying off debt and that sort of thing, it's a really great book to help you get all that in order. And then really understanding how to create a business plan and how to set aside money for business if that's what you want to do. So that's a practical but very important factor. And then I'd say also being sure you communicate with the people who were in your family in your life. A lot of people will have these great ideas and they will think about them, and they'll put pen to paper, and they'll go down the road, and then they announce to their family, or their wife, or whatever. "I think I'm going to quit my job and start a business." And you see their head spin-off and smoke coming out of their ears because they feel threatened, and frightened, and all of that. And communicating regularly with the people in your life's about what you're thinking about, asking for their support, brainstorming with them, getting them involved in your plans. And if there is an issue, if there is some sort of issue between you and your spouse or your family members, getting a mediator help you navigate through those situation. Travis: Nice. So that's four, you got one more? Barrie: Let's see. Travis: You're pretty good; I'm putting you on the spot. Barrie: Yeah, I'm trying to think, one more. Travis: No, let's leave it at 4. Barrie: Okay. Travis: Because you did such a great job and actually what you did is, you delivered on the five on the front, I think you gave me six or seven on front. Barrie: Good. So I'm still breaking even here.
  17. 17. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 17 of 21 Travis: Yeah, you do, and really good. Hey Barrie, are you ready for the lightning round? Barrie: Yeah, let's go. Travis: Do you have your seatbelt on? Barrie: I don't have a seatbelt but I'm holding on. Travis: Okay, good. So what book or program made an impact on you related to your business or related to business that you'd recommend? Barrie: Yeah, there's a book that I've read right as I first got started in my business that helped me enormously. And it's not really a business book but it will help you with business. It's by mega-coach, and author and speaker named Steve Chandler, and the book is called Fearless: Creating the Courage to Change the Things You Can. And this book really, really helps me understand the illusion of fear and learn how to manage fear and how to act in spite of fear, it was very eye-opening for me. Travis: Wow, I've never heard that, I'm going to put that on my list. Barrie: Yup, great guy, Steve Chandler. Travis: Excellent. What's one of your favorite tools or pieces of technology that you've recently discovered if any that you'd recommend to other business owners? Barrie: Yeah, for anyone who uses the internet for their business or has an online business, I recently discovered a really cool app called Buffer, that's B-U-F-F-E-R, and it helps you share information on all kind of social media in one click of a button. And if you're not savvy with social media and you don't have a social media manager, but everyone knows the importance of using it for your business, this is a great app, a great tool to help you do it quickly. Travis: Yeah, I agree with you. What famous quote would best summarize your belief or attitude in business? Barrie: Yes, it's by a guy named Howard Thurman and he is a civil rights leader, and a philosopher, and theologian, and the quote is this, "Don't ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then go do that because what the world needs is people who have come alive. Travis: I like that. Barrie: Yeah.
  18. 18. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 18 of 21 Travis: Alright, so I'll let you prepare for those three questions and that's the only three questions we ever share with a guest. Because you and I talked about it, we like the conversation just to be as organic as possible. Barrie: Absolutely. Travis: And I think people are on their best, or at their best when they're on their toes. Barrie: Okay. Travis: Do you have any special super powers? Barrie: Any special what? Travis: Super powers that you like to share with us. Barrie: Well, I think one of my special super powers is listening, and that's what got me into the coaching profession to begin with. I like to listen to people and I can intuit meanings behind what they are saying. And there's a real skill to listening well and to hearing what people say and being able to reflect it back to them so that they feel heard and they feel supported, and able to be safe, and share what they want to share. And maybe take the next step forward toward what they want to achieve in life. Travis: Great skill, I have that skill also. Barrie: Good. Travis: What do you dream of? Barrie: Oh wow, I dream of travel, I love travelling and I couldn't do a lot of it when my children were small. And so that's sort of my big dream goal, is to do a lot of traveling. I'm going to Italy in October to work on a course with another online entrepreneur who runs a bed and breakfast there in Italy, and is a creator and writer. That's going to be fun. I dream of making a positive impact on a lot of people, helping them to pull out of their fears and achieve your dreams. And I'm able to do some of that but I'd like to do it on an even bigger level through my coaching and my writing and my courses. And I dream of being able to appreciate every moment that I'm in and not get too lost in the past or the future, but to really savor the moment and see the joy and the beauty in everything I'm doing. Even the most mundane task because there is beauty even in the mundane.
  19. 19. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 19 of 21 Travis: Right. You've been a great guest. The depth that you go on both sides of this, the things that people should be doing and the things that typically get in their way just off of the top of your head speaks to the level of depth and thinking, and skill set that you have in this. Barrie: Oh, thank you, that's nice. I'll live on that all day. Travis: You bet. So I want to say thank you for taking the time to come out and hangout with me. Barrie: It was my pleasure, thank you so much Travis, this was a lot of fun. Travis: Yeah, I thoroughly enjoyed it. How do people connect with you? Barrie: Yeah, they can connect with me through either of my sites, BarrieDavenport.com or liveboldandbloom.com, their contact form's there. They can reach me through Facebook through barriedavenport, or on Twitter @coachbarrie, and so any of those ways are fine with me. Travis: Great. Can you hangout for a couple more minutes? Barrie: Absolutely. Travis: Excellent. So listen, I want to remind you that you can get all of the links to the book and resources mentioned in the show, actually there was a couple of books listed even throughout the interview. So just go to RockstarEntrepreneurNetwork.com and while you're there, I have a challenge for you, it's something that I told you about in the very beginning. I want you to click on the little icon right there on the right side of the screen that says send us a voice message. I want you to tell me a challenge or a problem that you're having with your business. I want you to think about from the perspective of what's keeping you from growing or finding that next level of success that will allow you to reach your true potential and make a difference. Are you struggling with marketing, staffing, sales, profits, it doesn't matter, any aspect of business. Just click on the send us a voice message and then give us your name, your business type, and what the problem is, and very soon we're going to start answering your questions on air. And I want you to think about it from this perspective. If you're having a problem with a certain thing or multiple things, there's a good chance that there's a large group of people having that same set of problems. So by being courageous enough to share that problem with us, we can help others, we can help you and everybody else listening. So today I want to close the show, or before I close the show, I want to remind you that no matter where you are as an entrepreneur, if you're just starting or you're setting the standard for everybody else, you're an inspiration to those around you to go after their dreams too, so keep it up. Our quote for today comes from Sophocles, and the quote reads, "Always desire to learn something useful." This is Travis Lane Jenkins signing off for now, do you want to say good bye Barrie?
  20. 20. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 20 of 21 Barrie: Good bye to all of your lovely listeners and thank you again for having me. End of Interview Travis: Thank you. To your incredible success my friend, take care.
  21. 21. THE ENTREPRENEUR’S RADIO SHOW Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs that Grow Your Business Copyright © 2012, 2013 The Entrepreneur‟s Radio Show Page 21 of 21 How We Can Help You We know that finding someone that you can trust online today is hard and that so many “so called gurus” are self-‐appointed and have never really even done what they teach you to do. That‟s exactly why we created the Double Your Profits Business Accelerator. This is an exclusive offer for our fans at a fraction of its normal cost. Here's what to expect. We'll Schedule a 'One on One' private session, where we'll take the time to dive deep into your business and tell you what is missing, so that you can have your best year ever! We'll do this by performing a S.W.O.T. Analysis. This tells us your Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats within your business. This will be an eye opener for YOU, for several reasons, however some of the most common reasons are. As the 'Business Owner' it‟s difficult to see the big picture of your own business because you‟re in the middle of a daily management. And you are too emotionally involved to completely impartial. This is a common problem for EVERY business owner. It doesn‟t matter if you are a one-man army, or an army of 150, the problem is still the same. Travis Lane Jenkins Business Mentor-Turn Around Specialist Radio Host of The Entrepreneurs Radio Show “Conversations with Self-made Millionaires and High-level Entrepreneurs That Grow Your Business"

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