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  • 1. A Growing Market: Non-English Speakers in the US John Watkins Chief Operating Officer ENLASO Corporation jwatkins@translate.com ENLASO Webinar June 2006
  • 2. ENLASO Language Technology Center • Localization Webinars and Seminars • The ENLASO Multilingual Standard Electronic Newsletter • Development of language technologies • Localization training and consulting • Active participation in the establishment of standards and best practices through active involvement with: • GALA • STC • UNICODE • W3C • OASIS • ATA
  • 3. A Growing Market: Non-English Speakers in the US • Today’s audience • Ask John Watkins questions! – John will answer your questions at the end of the presentation – Any questions not addressed will be answered in writing and provided to all attendees shortly • Request a copy of the presentation – If you would like to request a copy of this presentation, please email John Watkins at: jwatkins@translate.com or by calling (208) 672-8500 x95 or Chris Raulf at: craulf@translate.com or by calling (303) 516 0857 x103
  • 4. A Growing Market: Non-English Speakers in the US John Watkins Chief Operating Officer ENLASO Corporation jwatkins@translate.com ENLASO Webinar June 2006
  • 5. Why are we here? • Madeleine Albright started it: – An address to the UN in 1996: Cuban jet fighters downed two unarmed civilian planes from Miami, she said, quot;Frankly, this is not cojones, this is cowardice.quot; • Volkswagen carried it farther: – Here today, gone tamale – Kick a little gracias
  • 6. Why are we here? • On a more positive note – http://www.hp.com/go/hispanic (more later...)
  • 7. Presentation Overview 1. Defining key terms 2. Identifying the market demographics 3. Understanding the audience 4. Implementing effective strategies (Examples)
  • 8. Some Definitions… • Locale Combination of language, cultural preferences, character set, and other information that describes a particular target market or audience. • Globalization (G11N) Implementation of a global strategy that ensures the product or deliverable meets the needs of each locale, from early product development through localization. • Internationalization (I18N) Process of creating (or re-engineering) a product or deliverable to support difference locales. Usually a pre-requisite for successful localization. • Localization (L10N) Process of adapting a product for a particular locale. Usually comes after internationalization, creating a deliverable that has the look and feel of being created for the specific locale. • Interpretation Converting real-time spoken content in a source language into spoken content in a target language, either simultaneously or sequentially. • Translation Process of translating, editing and proofing textual content from a source language to a target language.
  • 9. Definitions, continued • Spanish An Iberian romance language spoken by over 350 million people worldwide. The official language of more than 20 countries (and “official/unofficial” recognition in one state in the US – New Mexico). Includes 9 other closely related languages. Hispanic refers a derivation from Spain, its people and culture. • Indo-European Languages Includes most languages of Europe and the Indic languages of India. These include the Germanic, Scandinavian, Romance, Baltic, Slavic, Iranian, Hindi, and Urdu languages. • Asian and Pacific Island languages Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Vietnam, Hmong, Khmer, Lao, Thai, Tagalog. • Other languages Includes Uralic (Hungarian), Semitic (Arabic & Hebrew), African, and native North American languages along with indigenous languages of Central and South America.
  • 10. Demographics • Relative US population by language Data: US Census Bureau, 2000
  • 11. Demographics • Population and English ability US English Language Skill Language Family Limited English By Language Family Spanish 13.8 14.3 50 Indo-European 3.4 6.6 45 40 Asian Pacific 3.6 3.4 35 24.3 In Millions Total 20.8 24.3 30 English 25 Limited 14.3 20 15 20.8 10 13.8 6.6 3.4 5 3.4 3.6 0 Spanish Indo- Asian Total European Pacific Limited English means they self-ranked English ability at less than “speaking very well” Data: US Census Bureau, 2000
  • 12. Demographics • US Geographic distribution Population by Geography West US Region South Asian Pacific Indo European Spanish Midwest North East 0.0 3.0 6.0 9.0 12.0 In Millions Data: US Census Bureau, 2000
  • 13. Demographics • Population growth by language family 1990 2000 % Language Population Population Change Spanish 17,345,064 28,101,052 62% Indo-European 8,790,133 10,017,989 14% Asian Pacific 4,471,621 6,960,065 56% Data: US Census Bureau, 2000
  • 14. Demographics • US Hispanic population – Spanish-speakers are the predominant market with ~50% of the foreign born US population coming from Central & South America • 34.5% from Central America • 9.9% from Caribbean • 6.6% from South America – ~60% of the US Spanish-speaking population comes from Mexico Data: US Census Bureau, 2000
  • 15. Demographics Summary • Nearly 50% of Non-English speaking households speak English less than “very well” • Some metro areas have majority populations who do not speak English very well • Both the Hispanic and Asian-Pacific populations have increased over 50% in 10 years • The Hispanic population is the largest Non-English speaking group in the US (~60% of Mexican heritage)
  • 16. Understanding the Market • Focus on the US Hispanic Market – Demographics show that the Hispanic market predominates in the US non-English speaking space – 41% of new jobs have gone to Hispanic workers: 2.4M jobs since May 2005, nearly 1M to the Hispanic workers. – Growth rate of the Hispanic market • Growth rate of 7.7% per year – three times the average US household value • Currently nearly $700 Billion, $250 Billion from “low income” populations • Projected at over $1 Trillion by 2010 – 2 million small and midsize Hispanic-owned U.S. businesses to grow to 8 million by 2010 Sources: HispanicBusiness.com, US Small Business Administration
  • 17. Understanding the Market • Spanish speakers in the US do not represent an homogenous culture – Most requested foreign language is Spanish – Regional differences in vocabulary (Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican…) – Related languages (Spanish-origin languages and Central American indigenous languages)
  • 18. Understanding the Market • Assimilation, integration, and cultural considerations – Original Assimilation Model • Three generations result in cultural assimilation • Holds true for smaller population groups – New model • Reduced assimilation • Supported by large populations sharing a common culture (e.g., California, Texas, Florida) • 80% of US Hispanic population retains Spanish – Integration of Spanish & English (Spanglish) in younger populations – Spanish remains primary language for adults
  • 19. Understanding the Market • Spanish variants – Agenciero: Guat. and Perú diligent // Cuba and Mex. removal agent // Argent. lottery seller // Vulg. Chile. money lender – Apendejarse: Col., Pan. and Sto. Dom. to go soft in the head // Cuba, Nicar. to get scared – Apensionar: to impose a tax or pension // Col., Chile, Mex and Perú to become sad – Droga: drug // Fig. Col. and Ecuad. Annoying or bothersome person or thing // Canarias, Navarra, Mex. Debt – Tiznado: blackened // Central America drunk person – Cartucho: cartridge // Chile (vulg) sexually inexperienced – Pico: beak, peak // Chile (vulg) male genital // Col. kiss // Mex. picos = running shoes – Guagua: Chile baby // Cuba bus – Banqueta: stool // Mex. Sidewalk Examples thanks to Spanish Back Office (spanishbackoffice.com)
  • 20. Understanding the Market • Overseeing the Spanish language evolution – La Real Academia Española – Contributions from committees in every Spanish speaking country – Aids in creating standardized Spanish with accepted regional terminology • Impact of education – >50% Latin American Hispanics in the US do not have a high-school diploma – Reliance on regional vocabulary Thanks to Jorge Uphoff for background information on La Real Academia Espanola Education demographics provided by the US Census, 2000
  • 21. Effective Strategies • Current Status – Common Sense Advisory email research of the 100 most valuable US brands: • Less than 50% of companies respond to Spanish-language questions on Web forms / emails • Of those, 50% responded in English – Impact of immigration reform – Debate on defining the US “National Language” – Realities of a consumer-based economy Experiment described in their study “Corporate Email Disconnect” and in “Hispanic Marketing: A Cultural Perspective” by Donald DePalma, Multilingual Magazine, #79 April/May 2006 See also www.commonsenseadvisory.com/latino/
  • 22. Effective Strategies • Reaching the audience – The US Hispanic market is large and growing – Companies are just beginning to reach these markets, spending $3.3B for market of $700B – People prefer to hear your message in their native language (new immigrants and first generation) – Translation could be a wise investment, but not a monolithic approach to the Hispanic market
  • 23. Effective Strategies • What is communicated – Globalization – Internationalization • Verbal/Aural information – Interpretation • Printed information – Localization & Translation
  • 24. Effective Strategies • Interpretation – Spoken content from source language to target language • In person • Telephone-based (connections in ~1 minute) – Predominates in Healthcare and Legal applications – Project characteristics • On-demand service • Reliance on technological infrastructure • Fast-paced, 24/7 service – Vendor characteristics • Appropriate skills with interpretation resources • Availability • Cost
  • 25. Effective Strategies • Interpretation examples – Hospitals • Patient registration • Physician assistance – Legal • Interviewing & depositions • Court – Voice mail systems • “Press 1 for English, Press 2 for Spanish” • Connect to Online interpretation
  • 26. Effective Strategies • Localization – Take written content and convert to target language • Multiple language support on one product (most common for instructions) • Unique product “look and feel” in each language (most common for Web sites) – Project characteristics • It is new: Naiveté of localization customer (not used to thinking about Non-English speaking consumers) • Large number of small projects • Fast turn around • Less expensive (US resources) • Targeting correct market (language base and reading level) – Vendor characteristics • Experience with US Non-English speaking market • Understanding of language needs (which Spanish for what market) • Linguistic resources with appropriate marketing, legal, medical, educational background • Capability to execute QA with appropriate US-market representatives
  • 27. Effective Strategies • Localization examples – Product materials • Packaging • Installation instructions • User manuals – Retail • Web site support • Store signs – Customer surveys – HR materials • Employee enrollment • Benefits information • Memoranda – Legal & Financial • Notices • Disclosures • Agreements
  • 28. Examples • Office Depot – New Office Depot Hispanic marketing campaign supports “Back-to-School” Initiatives – Integrated program (mailers, advertising, Web) positions Office Depot as the “destination of choice” for Hispanic Students, Parents and Teachers
  • 29. Examples • McDonald’s – Icons – Spanish language support in US
  • 30. Examples • HP – Approximately 3% of current revenue, projected to grow to 10% by 2010 – In spring 2004, the $79.91 billion Hewlett-Packard established a division devoted to U.S. Hispanic- and female-owned small and midsize businesses – Surveyed consumers for marketing preferences (mail) – Mailed Spanish & English Catalogs – Educating consumers to online information www.hp.com/go/hispanic
  • 31. Examples • Scotts (e.g., Miracle Gro) – Packaging materials – Bilingual instructions – Web site 20% of US traffic
  • 32. Examples • University of Michigan Health System – English & Spanish informational materials – Telephone help line in both languages
  • 33. Examples • Legal – Loan Origination Agreement
  • 34. Conclusion • Demographics – Increasing presence of Non-English speakers in the US – Spanish speakers predominate • Understanding the Market – Hispanic market is not homogenous – Significant market size with remarkable growth rate • Effective Strategies – Communicating with the audience is a primary step – Interpretation – Localization/Translation – Appropriate resources available who are experienced with the market
  • 35. Further information • US Census Bureau: www.census.gov • Hispanic Business Web site (www.hispanicbusiness.com) • Common Sense Advisory (www.commonsenseadvisory.com) • MultiLingual Magazine (www.multilingual.com)
  • 36. Thank you! Any questions?
  • 37. Contacts • John Watkins (208) 672-8500 x95 jwatkins@translate.com • Chris Raulf (303) 516-0857 x103 craulf@translate.com
  • 38. Demographics by Metro Area Number % of US Metro Area Limited Population English Hialeah, FL 126,358 59.3 East Los Angeles, CA 57,966 51.9 Santa Ana, CA 156,692 51.7 El Monte, CA 53,662 51.1 Miami, FL 160,790 47.1 Laredo, TX 69,071 43.6 Brownsville, TX 52,970 42.0 Garden Grove, CA 57,313 37.6 Elizabeth, NJ 41,068 36.8 Salinas, CA 49,099 35.9