Online Literacy and Critical Thinking
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Online Literacy and Critical Thinking

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These days, students and teachers alike are spending a lot of time online. Among issues which affect those who "live on the Internet," information validity and "information overload" are frequently ...

These days, students and teachers alike are spending a lot of time online. Among issues which affect those who "live on the Internet," information validity and "information overload" are frequently discussed. Both of these issues can be addressed through critical thinking. More specifically, students and teachers can undertake what Alexandre calls "online literacy," the Internet version of "media literacy." By evaluating, creating, and analyzing online content, anyone should be able to assess the validity of the information they process and decrease the effects of "information overload" in their online lives.

This session will explore online literacy in learning and teaching contexts.

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Online Literacy and Critical Thinking Online Literacy and Critical Thinking Presentation Transcript

  • ALEXANDRE ENKERLI HTTP://ENKERLI.WORDPRESS.COM Online Literacy and Critical Thinking
  • This Session
    • Semi-directive
    • Use chat to interact
    • Questions at end
    • Recording will be available
    • Slides already available
  • Introductions
    • Locations
    • Interests
    • Primary roles
      • Students
      • Teachers
      • Journalists/media
  • Origins of this Session
    • Journalism on online reading
      • “ Kids these days”
    • Living online
    • Information overload and globalisation
    • Other WiZiQ sessions
  • Tall Order
    • Primary learning
    • Takes time
      • Ways of Knowing
    • “ Planting landminds”
  • Literacy
    • “ Reading and writing”
    • Basic skill
    • Savviness (being savvy, know what to do with)
    • Individual approach
  • Media Literacy
    • “ Don’t get fooled”
    • “ Everyone has something to sell”
    • “ In on secret”
    • “ How to read newspapers”
    • Media criticism
  • Journalistic Assumptions
    • Source trust
    • Removing bias
    • Balance and neutrality
    • Difference in skills
  • Critical Thinking
    • “ Critical sense” («sens critique»)
    • Behind information
    • Can a representation be accurate?
    • Make mind
    • Criticism Not Nitpicking
  • Online Disadvantages
    • Fragmented reading
    • Skimming
    • No authority?
    • Information overload
  • Online Advantages
    • Ease of finding
    • Ease of sharing
    • Multiplicity of voices
    • Multichannel
    • Informal
  • Forced Critical Thinking
    • Spam
    • Troll
    • Fanboy
    • April Fool’s
    • The Onion
    • The Colbert Report
    • The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
    • Blog
  • Information Overload
    • “ Fire hydrant”
    • Don’t try to take everything in
    • Deemphasize memory
    • Seek information or let information select you
    • Keywords, tags, folksonomies
    • Distributed reading
  • Taking In
    • “ Read, read, read”
    • Immerse yourself
    • Overwhelming
    • Don’t worry about understanding everything
    • Reserve judgement
    • Notice patterns
  • How to Read
    • Concentric circles
    • Front and back matter
    • Headings
    • Assumptions
    • Shaver and Reimer on better reading
  • Processing
    • Evaluating
    • Creating
    • Analyzing
  • Post-Reading
    • “ Establish relationship with author”
    • Discuss
    • Share
    • Comment
    • Transform
  • Writing
    • Active reading
    • Note-taking
    • Quick writing
    • Public writing
    • Dare write
    • Try ideas out
    • Getting comments
  • Source
    • Source criticism
    • Source bias
    • Primary or secondary source
    • Narrative and form
    • “ Why do they say this?”
    • Cultural translation
  • Source Types
    • Joke
    • Fairytale
    • Rumour
    • Legend
    • Newspaper piece
    • Encyclopedia entry
    • Personal narrative (anecdote)
    • Peer-reviewed scholarly journals
  • What to do with source?
    • Context
    • Author
    • Internal structure
    • Representative of viewpoint
    • Use in broader approach
    • Independent verification
    • Discuss
  • Wikipedia as Source
    • Encyclopaedias in general
    • Neutrality as ideal (NPOV)
    • Exhaustivity as dream (Diderot)
    • Britannica isn’t better
      • Often single-author
      • Selected topics
      • Anglo-American
      • Monolingual
  • Links
    • Baloney Detection Kit
    • Shaver and Reimer on Reading Better
    • Intellectual Self-Defense
    • Intute’s Virtual Training Suite
      • Internet Detective
    • Raising Standards – By Lowering Them
  • Wikipedia Articles
    • Information Criticism
    • Critical Literacy
    • Credibility
    • Cognitive Authority
    • Source Evaluation
    • Source Criticism
  • Alexandre Links
    • Main blog: Disparate http://enkerli.wordpress.com/
    • Slideshare
    • Diigo
    • Twitter
    • Drop.io