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BIC Conference: The Realities of Digital

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Keynote given by Peter Collingridge at the BiC (Books in Classification) conference in London, December 2010. …

Keynote given by Peter Collingridge at the BiC (Books in Classification) conference in London, December 2010.


BIC Script

I’m Peter Collingridge, co-founder of Enhanced Editions. I have a 13 year background in digital publishing, starting off at Canongate in 1997, where I set up their first website, which was described by the Guardian as “A cool club stocked with well-read friends rather than a lazy corporate exercise”.

The connection I made with readers directly through this website has been a big influence on my outlook towards the opportunities of digital, and part of what I will talk to you about today.

I left Canongate 4 years later to set up my own consultancy, Apt, which has produced over 25 digital projects for publishers, from HarperCollins and 4th Estate, to Random House, Granta Magazine, Picador, Mills and Boon, Hachette, Walker Books, Laurence King, Little Brown, Portobello, Frances Lincoln and many more.

In 2009 I co-founded Enhanced Editions with two of my smartest friends. Enhanced Editions was set in the belief that we could make the ebooks that the 21st century deserved, and our first project was Nick Cave’s The Death of Bunny Munro. Here’s a short video about that:

[Show video]

Bunny came out in September last year, and was lucky enough to receive some pretty amazing feedback from users, the media, and the industry. We’ve produced more than 20 apps in the last year, as well as helping Andrew Wylie “destroy publishing” with his Odyssey Editions launch.

From all these projects, and more, we have learned a huge amount, all of which comes under the banner of today’s topic - the realities of digital change.

I don’t want to stand here and give you the sales pitch. In fact, we are basically closing our doors for the next few months to all but the most exciting of projects, because we feel that it’s time we went back “to the lab” to work on the next generation of products.

What I would like to do is share with you our current thinking about what the future of publishing looks like, and how we think publishers should be set up to benefit from such a future.

So, this afternoon I am going to talk briefly about where we think publishing is headed (clue: it’s all about your consumers), and how the most effective publishers will orient themselves to this direction.


////

By 2015, publishing industry executives estimate that between 20-50% of books sold in the US will be digital. Other countries, including the UK, will not be far behind.

Industry analyst Mike Shatzkin reckons that “If by the end of 2012, 25% of sales for a new book are digital, then about half of new book sales will be made through online purchases”

In other words, as well as a shift to digital in terms of ebook sales, don’t forget about the continued chunk of the print business also going through online retailers. The consequence of both is obvious: physical sales, and the shops that make them, will be cannibalized. And some of those shops will close, probably concentrating power in the hands of fewer, larger players.

Scott Lubeck of BISG recently told me that he is interested in the “cataclysmic tipping point” in eBook publishing; that moment when the existing supply chain, geared around physical products, begins to disintegrate. His estimate is that it is around 15-20%, and that as well as bookshops closing, other things will happen. Economies of scale, such as the price of paper, printing, ink, and distribution, will go away. And the result of that is that physical books will become more expensive, or even less profitable, thereby driving cost-conscious consumers even further towards ebooks, and publishers to the wall.

Tim Spalding, founder of social reading website LibraryThing, takes this further when he talked recently of other “positive feedback loops” in eBooks. One such effect is “the highlander principle” - this is that in ecommerce, success tend

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  • 1. The realities of digital change all the time.Enhanced EditionsBICNovember 30, 2010
  • 2. Canongate.net 1.0 (1997–2002)
  • 3. “ At last… a publisher’s site that feels like a cool club stocked with well-read friends rather than a lazy corporate exercise.” The Guardian
  • 4. Definition of apt1 : unusually fitted or qualified2 a : having a tendencyb : ordinarily disposed3 : suited to a purpose;especially: being to the point4: keenly intelligent andresponsive
  • 5. Jim RhysStrategy Product EE Peter Publishing
  • 6. The evolution of the bookwww.enhanced-editions.com
  • 7. Users Awards Media“Sets the gold MediaGuardian “The momentstandard for future Innovation award digital publishingliterary apps.” came of age” iTunes & Observer The Bookseller apps of the year“Worth every cent. “Sprinkling a littleNo actually worth eConsultancy rock’n’roll glamoura lot more!” Innovation Award over publishing” Guardian Wolff Olins “Future” award
  • 8. PlanningMetadata / ONIXDocBook, ePub, MobiWeb designSEOIdentity & book designUser experienceProject managementOdyssey
  • 9. Innovation Customer focusFutureof publishing
  • 10. 1The forecasters
  • 11. “If, by the end of2012, 25% of salesfor a new book aredigital, then abouthalf of new booksales will be madethrough onlinepurchases”Shatzkin
  • 12. “What % of salesas digital is acataclysmictipping point forthe physical supplychain?”Lubeck
  • 13. “Positive feedbackloops in ebooks:success accrues toa small number ofcompanies”Spalding
  • 14. “It’s time to stoplooking for readersfor your writers,and to start findingwriters for yourreaders”Godin
  • 15. “[Random Housewill…] change frombeing a b2bcompany to b2ccompany.”Dohle
  • 16. Publishing 2010 2015% Digital 5% ±50%Model B2B B2CNeeds to Read Choose Purchase Read Discuss Shareinfluence
  • 17. 2Romance is not dead
  • 18. 1. Find 2. Launch 3. Connectwriters rebrand with readers
  • 19. 1. Long term 2. Insight 3. Extendedrelationships footprint
  • 20. Target 8,000 users 15 pp / visitentries: 250 10,000 20,000 uniquesActual: 823 comments 3x Facebook 1m views fans 20m visits 2x Twitter
  • 21. Print Targets& PR Win Digital
  • 22. 3The goal
  • 23. Products Customer focusEnhancedEditions
  • 24. “When it comes tothe really important decisions, data trumps intuition every time. ” Jeff Bezos
  • 25. Next-level Next-level Innovation &apps communities customer focusInformed by Clear valueuser propositionfeedback
  • 26. “Among 45,000respondents wesaw a breathtakingvelocity for thegrowth of weekly ordaily e-reading:doubled from7-14% in sixmonths.”BISG
  • 27. Philip Pullman on publishing in 2010
  • 28. “Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.” Samuel Beckett @gunzalispeter@enhanced-editions.com