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111125 IChemE Palmer
 

111125 IChemE Palmer

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    111125 IChemE Palmer 111125 IChemE Palmer Presentation Transcript

    • AustraliaDesalination and Water Security Presentation to JCEC AGM Nov 2011 Neil Palmer, CEO
    • The National Centre ofExcellence inDesalination Australia Established in 2009 $20m funding over 5 years from Federal Government’s National Urban Water and Desalination Plan Research Roadmap developed 2
    • 14 Research Partners 3
    • Funding over 5 years: Source Australian Government $20m WA Government $3m Partners $7m Sponsors $1m Murdoch University $11m Project Partners $30m TOTAL $72m 4
    • The Australian Desalination Research Roadmapdeveloped priority research themes,validated by industry Pre-treatment Reverse osmosis desalting Novel desalting Concentrate management Social, environmental and economic issues 5
    • Research Projects Funding Projects NCEDA Partners TOTAL Round Funds Cash and In Kind 1 11 $2.8m $8.1m $10.9m 2 12 $3.0m $6.9m $9.9m 3 11 $3.8m $7.6m $11.3m TOTAL 34 $9.6m $22.6m $32.1m FR 4 opening Monday! 6
    • Projects by priority research themes Pretreatment 4 6 7 RO 12 Novel 5 Concentrate Social Total 34 projects 7
    • Desal Discovery Centre 8
    • Desal Discovery Centre 9
    • Desal Discovery Centre at Chemfest 12 Nov 2011 10
    • PeopleMurdoch University ViceChancellorProfessor Richard HiggottNCEDA Chief ScientificOfficerProfessor David FurukawaNCEDA CEONeil Palmer
    • PeopleGraeme Rowley Larry Lopez Larry Lopez
    • Students
    • International collaboration
    • Pilot Scale TestFacility 15
    • Pilot Scale T Facility estMembrane distillation 16
    • Pilot Scale TestFacility Membrane distillation 17
    • Pilot Scale TestFacility Great Victoria Desert 18
    • Tjuntjuntjara
    • Tjuntjuntjara
    • What is the place of seawater desalination in Australia’snatural cycle of drought and floods? 21
    • NCEDA vision for desalination: Efficient and sustainable augmentation of traditional water sources to provide security against the natural variability of rainfall and potential future impact of climate change 22
    • The Australian Millennium drought 1997-2010 23
    • The Australian Millennium drought 1997-2010 Pejar dam, Goulburn, NSW November 2005 24
    • The AustralianMillennium drought1997-2010 25
    • The drought breaks Extensive flooding in Eastern states in January 2011 26
    • Wivenhoe Dam, Brisbane, January 2011 27
    • Water QualityPopulation Growth 28
    • NCEDA’s new vision for desalination? Efficient and sustainable augmentation of traditional water sources to provide security against:  the natural variability of rainfall potential future impact of climate change declining traditional source water quality population growth 29
    • Australian Population Density Source: ABS Statistical Local Area-based projections. Compiled by the Environmental Information Resources
    • RainfallSource: Australian Bureau of Meteorology
    • Australian rainfall changeChange in rainfall, mm/ 10 years 1900 - 2010 1970 -2010 Source: The Critical Decade Climate Change Commission May 2010 p33 32
    • Perth, Australia 33
    • Perth reservoir inflows long termStreamflows (GL/pa) 13.1 GL Page 34 Courtesy Water Corporation
    • Decline in groundwater resources 35
    • Australian Desalination Distillation in 1895, Coolgardie
    • Coolgardie, 1895: distillation Golden Pipeline
    • Major Australian desalination plants Karratha Brisbane Whyalla Gold Coast Perth Sydney Adelaide Melbourne
    • Courtesy of Water CorporationPerth 1 145 MLD
    • Gold Coast 125 MLD Courtesy of WaterSecure
    • Courtesy of Sydney WaterSydney 250 MLD
    • Adelaide 300 MLD Courtesy of SA Water Corporation
    • Courtesy of Water CorporationPerth 2 - 300 MLD
    • Melbourne 450 MLD Courtesy of Victorian Government
    • Australia’s current major desal plants PLANT MLD MGD  PSDP 145 38  Gold Coast 125 33  Sydney 1 250 66  Adelaide 300 78  SSDP 1 150 39  Cape Preston 140 47  Melbourne 1 450 118 TOTAL 1560 419 45
    • Potential future plants PLANT MLD MGD  Whyalla 280 73  SSDP2 150 39  North Brisbane 150 39  North Perth 150 39  NSW Central Coast 50 13  WA West Pilbara 30 8  WA South Downs 35 10  TOTAL 845 221 46
    • City Water Desal Desal Percent Consumption Capacity, Capacity Desal 02/03*, GL ML/D GL/ySydney 634 250 91 14%Melbourne 479 450 164 34%Brisbane SWRO 223 125 46 20%Brisbane Reuse 223 232 85 38%Brisbane Total 223 357 130 58%Perth PDSP 212 144 53 25%Perth SSDP 212 150 55 26%Perth Total 212 294 107 51%Adelaide 178 300 110 62%TOTAL 1726 1651 603 35% * WSAAfacts 03 47
    • Trad Desal700 2012 Desal Capacity600 cf 2003 (pre drought) Consumption500400300200100 0 Sydney Melbourne Brisbane Perth Adelaide Note: Brisbane desal capacity includes Western Corridor recycling 48
    • So what do we tellpeople aboutdesalination? 49
    • For an averagehousehold, if allthe water camefrom desalination,the energy used isabout the same asthat used by therefrigerator 50
    • The McMansion.Energy to desalt all the day’s water is used by the airconditioning system in less than 30 minutes 51
    • The 747 has 4 engines each24 MW and cruises at 66MW – equivalent to 3 PerthDesal Plants 52
    • Queen Mary 2• 117 MW installed power• More than enough power to make desalinated water for the whole of Perth Source: Wikipedia 2011- RMS Queen Mary 2 53
    • All energy use forthe big Australiandesal plants isoffset with windand solar energyVery low operatingcarbon footprint 54
    • SA Water price increase for desalination 08/09 09/10 10/11 11/12 08/09 08/09 11/12 11/12Residential Charge $157.30 $137.60 $142.40 $234.40 $157.30 $234.400-30 kL $1.28 $1.93 30 $57.900-120 kL $0.71 $0.97 120 $85.2030-130 kL $2.48 $2.75 100 $275.00120-520 kL $1.38 $1.88 70 $96.60>130 kL $2.98 $2.98 60 $178.80>520 kL $1.65 $2.26 190 $339.10 190 $746.10Difference between total annual water bill in 08/09 and 11/12 $407.00Weekly amount $7.80 SA Water price from SA Minister for Water Security 55
    • Affordable watersecurity 56
    • Giant Cuttlefish, SA 57
    • Cockburn Sound, WA 2.5 haPSDP Courtesy of Water Corporation
    • Concentrate return Kwinana outfall impact finding:  “The effluent from the desalination plant is so highly diluted that it does not have a measurable impact on stratification or dissolved oxygen in the deep basin (>10m) of Cockburn Sound” Centre for Water Research, Uni of WA: Summary of Investigations into the Impact of the Perth Seawater Desalination Plant Discharge on Cockburn Sound, August 2007 59
    • International Workshop on Intakes andOutfallsGWI Desal Short SchoolAdelaide, South Australia 16-18 May 2012
    • 62
    • Australia THANK YOUwww.desalination.edu.au Neil Palmer CEO