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Design principles

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  • 1. DesignDesign PrinciplesPrinciples Saints Talented Team
  • 2. The First StepsThe First Steps Know Your Target Audience How will they interpret your message? What needs are you trying to meet?
  • 3. The First StepsThe First Steps Find Inspiration Keep an idea file for copies of materials where the design/layout that have impressed you Don’t be afraid to “steal” ideas from others
  • 4. The First StepsThe First Steps Have all information ready before beginning your project Helps to avoid backtracking and loss of time Allows you to visually plan out your project (troubleshoot)
  • 5. Design PrinciplesDesign Principles
  • 6. Does the design feel like it is in balance? BalanceBalance
  • 7. Balance is one of the important points the success of a design. Everyone loves the convenience (not lame) to what they see. BalanceBalance
  • 8. Balance in graphic design can be achieved by adjusting the visual weight of each element, both in terms of scale, color, contrast, etc. BalanceBalance
  • 9. Broadly speaking, the balance in graphic design can be divided to two parts BalanceBalance
  • 10. 1. Symmetrical balance BalanceBalance Symmetrical balance occurs when the visual weight of design elements evenly divided in terms of horizontal, vertical, or radial. This style relies on a balance of two similar elements from two different sides.
  • 11. 1. Symmetrical balance BalanceBalance Conditions in the symmetrical equilibrium is a general style that is often used to achieve a balance in design. Although it is easy to implement, symmetrical balance is difficult to evoke emotion from the Visual readers because it was impressed too "planned". Symmetrical balance is also commonly referred to as formal balance.
  • 12. Symmetrical balance example BalanceBalance This poster has been assembled with a combination of visual elements symmetrically between the left and right. Design elements on the left side of the balance with other elements such as the right side of the mirror.
  • 13. BalanceBalance Arranging parts to achieve a state of equilibrium between forces of influences.
  • 14. 2. Asymmetrycal balance BalanceBalance Asymmetrical balance occurs when the visual weight of design elements are not evenly distributed in the central axis of the page. This style relies on visual games such as scale, contrast, color to achieve a balance with irregular. We often see a design with the big picture offset by the small but visible text balanced because the game contrast, color, etc.
  • 15. 2. Asymmetrycal balance BalanceBalance Asymmetrical balance is more likely to arouse emotions because the Visual reader and the resulting visual tension. Tensions asymmetric also referred to informal balance.
  • 16. Asymmetrical balance example BalanceBalance This poster uses the asymmetric form of contrasting styles and scale. Elements of a large black hand balanced by Flawless black text but its small size.
  • 17. - Radial balance BalanceBalance Can be considered a kind of Asymmetrical balance
  • 18. Tips: Balance in Graphic DesignTips: Balance in Graphic Design
  • 19. 1. Balance by color1. Balance by color can occur when a small area with bright colors combined with a large area with a dark color. In addition, of course, understanding the use of color must be mastered first
  • 20. 2. Balance by shape2. Balance by shape can be created through the field of complex composition with a flat field (plain). Field complex and more details will appear in balance with the plain area in the opposite side.
  • 21. 3. Balance by position3. Balance by position Balance in position is another example of the kind of balance Asymmetric, where a large object on one side balanced by putting the smaller objects on the other side.
  • 22. 3. Balance by position3. Balance by position Balance in position is another example of the kind of balance Asymmetric, where a large object on one side balanced by putting the smaller objects on the other side.
  • 23. 4. Balance by value4. Balance by value Value color can also be a key point in the balance of a design. Small area of high value- will create a balance when combined with a large area with a low value.
  • 24. 4. Balance by value4. Balance by value Black and white photographs combine the main object of a man and a dog that has a high value value (solid black) with a broad area that has a lower value (gray).
  • 25. 5. Balance by texture5. Balance by texture Texture also affects the balance of a design. Just like the previous principle, in which the area is more complex, detailed and attract the attention going to look good when combined with a large area of the flat. Small area with an interesting texture looks balanced when combined with a large area and flat (no texture)
  • 26. 5. Balance by texture5. Balance by texture In this artwork, the narrow form of rippling water has a water texture which attract the focus appears balanced with a wider area but not textured.
  • 27. 6. Balance by eye direction6. Balance by eye direction can also occur when we lead the reader's eyes to the main content. The objects are used as "tools" to guide the reader's eyes composed with a larger area, while the main content displayed in a smaller area.
  • 28. 6. Balance by eye direction6. Balance by eye direction they help guide the eye and mind movement of the viewer. They can also bind the work into a single entity.
  • 29. ContrastContrast Simply contrast tells the viewer where to look first.
  • 30. ContrastContrast Some types of contrast to keep in mind are the relative darkness (called value in color theory), weight, form, placement, quantity, texture, and scale.
  • 31. ContrastContrast Without contrast, a designed piece may appear static, uninteresting, and hard for the reader to access because it is not immediately clear what to look at first.
  • 32. TypographyTypography
  • 33. TypographyTypography Too many type faces
  • 34. TypographyTypography Spacing
  • 35. TypographyTypography Alignment
  • 36. TypographyTypography Decorative faces aren't always beautiful
  • 37. TypographyTypography Size matters
  • 38. TypographyTypography Readability
  • 39. TypographyTypography Color
  • 40. TypographyTypography Grouping
  • 41. TypographyTypography Leading
  • 42. TypographyTypography Kerning

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