Making it relevant: Dogme,  the Web and business    English materials        Nick Robinson, York            TESOL France  ...
@nmkrobinson
A career though    Dogme
"The Thornbury/Meddings - Soars         Continuum" ©
Some definitionsDogme /     Web 2.0Teachingunplugged
“Dogme language teaching is considered to beboth a methodology and a movement. Dogme isa communicative approach to languag...
“The common conception (or misconception)is that unplugged teaching requireseschewing all forms of convenience, such ascou...
Language learning and use are situated,contextualised, social and personalised... ...andthis should reflect on the way tha...
... it’s all “about teaching thatfocuses on emergent language”(Meddings & Thornbury, 2009,p.8).
A Web 2.0 site allows users to interact andcollaborate with each other in a socialmedia dialogue as creators (prosumers)of...
The Web started out as a ‘pipe’.
Where did Web content come from?Top-down, expert-created, static, passively consumed
The web has evolved into a platform ...where we all work together to create, share, discuss, learn.
How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
Facebook use in France
Facebook use in France          23,190,260 users
Facebook use in France          23,190,260 users          51.97% of online             population
Facebook use in France          23,190,260 users          51.97% of online             population          35.80% of total...
Facebook use in France          23,190,260 users          51.97% of online             population          35.80% of total...
What do Dogme and Web 2.0 have in common?
A Web 2.0 site / An unplugged classroomallows users to interact and collaborate witheach other in a [social media] dialogu...
The ten key principles of         Dogme(Thornbury, Scott [2005])
Group taskDiscuss the following questions:   What does this principle mean   in relation to Dogme?   Is this principle als...
Four guiding principles    (and one law)1. Whoever comes is [sic] the right people.2. Whenever it starts is the right time...
What does this principle mean in relation to Dogme?Is this principlealso apparent inWeb 2.0? If so,how?How does/could this...
‘360 °content creation’                     Student   Publisher                   School    Business                   Tea...
Stay in touch!nick@english360.com@nmkrobinsonenglish360.com
Merci et au revoir!
Making it relevant: Dogme, the Web and business English materials
Making it relevant: Dogme, the Web and business English materials
Making it relevant: Dogme, the Web and business English materials
Making it relevant: Dogme, the Web and business English materials
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Making it relevant: Dogme, the Web and business English materials

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In 2005, Scott Thornbury laid out the principles of dogme ELT. From them emerges a picture of the classroom as an engaging, interactive space with the learner at its centre, free from the constraints of "third-party, imported materials". Where does this leave teachers who still want to "import" materials into the classroom? Do business English coursebooks, other published resources and material from the Web have a place in the dogme classroom? I'd argue they do, especially when personalised and localised to achieve another of dogme ELT's key goals: relevance. Reference will be made to English360.

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  • the Internet was created in my lifetime, and has come a long way, too\n originally, top-down\n text-based content provide by the few for mass consumption\n
  • used for reference / research / fact-finding\n no interactivity between users\n Analogy: like reading a book quietly, by yourself, in the library…\n
  • Web 2.0 – from the early ‘noughties’ - 2003/4\na platform which offers new possibilities for connecting and interacting with others\n instead of working on the Net, we can now network\n Analogy: unlike the solitary Net experience of the early days, interaction enabled by Web 2.0 could be likened to participating in a reading and writing circle!\n
  • far more interactive and democratic\n no longer the preserve of text - can combine media types > ‘mashups’ – e.g. social networking sites\n we can all have a Net presence – profiles, testimonials (LinkedIn), blogs\n all users can now easily upload their own content – wide-ranging (photos, video, recipes, ratings, tagging, favouriting)\n content is much more dynamic, and editable\n including rich content (e.g. Flash videos)\n** when did you last use the Web, and why?**\nview others’ content and share it\n but can also set privacy levels\n has opened doors to discussion and comments on forums, express your opinion\n facilitated communication with email, instant messaging systems, Skype\n
  • far more interactive and democratic\n no longer the preserve of text - can combine media types > ‘mashups’ – e.g. social networking sites\n we can all have a Net presence – profiles, testimonials (LinkedIn), blogs\n all users can now easily upload their own content – wide-ranging (photos, video, recipes, ratings, tagging, favouriting)\n content is much more dynamic, and editable\n including rich content (e.g. Flash videos)\n** when did you last use the Web, and why?**\nview others’ content and share it\n but can also set privacy levels\n has opened doors to discussion and comments on forums, express your opinion\n facilitated communication with email, instant messaging systems, Skype\n
  • far more interactive and democratic\n no longer the preserve of text - can combine media types > ‘mashups’ – e.g. social networking sites\n we can all have a Net presence – profiles, testimonials (LinkedIn), blogs\n all users can now easily upload their own content – wide-ranging (photos, video, recipes, ratings, tagging, favouriting)\n content is much more dynamic, and editable\n including rich content (e.g. Flash videos)\n** when did you last use the Web, and why?**\nview others’ content and share it\n but can also set privacy levels\n has opened doors to discussion and comments on forums, express your opinion\n facilitated communication with email, instant messaging systems, Skype\n
  • far more interactive and democratic\n no longer the preserve of text - can combine media types > ‘mashups’ – e.g. social networking sites\n we can all have a Net presence – profiles, testimonials (LinkedIn), blogs\n all users can now easily upload their own content – wide-ranging (photos, video, recipes, ratings, tagging, favouriting)\n content is much more dynamic, and editable\n including rich content (e.g. Flash videos)\n** when did you last use the Web, and why?**\nview others’ content and share it\n but can also set privacy levels\n has opened doors to discussion and comments on forums, express your opinion\n facilitated communication with email, instant messaging systems, Skype\n
  • far more interactive and democratic\n no longer the preserve of text - can combine media types > ‘mashups’ – e.g. social networking sites\n we can all have a Net presence – profiles, testimonials (LinkedIn), blogs\n all users can now easily upload their own content – wide-ranging (photos, video, recipes, ratings, tagging, favouriting)\n content is much more dynamic, and editable\n including rich content (e.g. Flash videos)\n** when did you last use the Web, and why?**\nview others’ content and share it\n but can also set privacy levels\n has opened doors to discussion and comments on forums, express your opinion\n facilitated communication with email, instant messaging systems, Skype\n
  • far more interactive and democratic\n no longer the preserve of text - can combine media types > ‘mashups’ – e.g. social networking sites\n we can all have a Net presence – profiles, testimonials (LinkedIn), blogs\n all users can now easily upload their own content – wide-ranging (photos, video, recipes, ratings, tagging, favouriting)\n content is much more dynamic, and editable\n including rich content (e.g. Flash videos)\n** when did you last use the Web, and why?**\nview others’ content and share it\n but can also set privacy levels\n has opened doors to discussion and comments on forums, express your opinion\n facilitated communication with email, instant messaging systems, Skype\n
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  • Interactivity: the most direct route to learning is to be found in the interactivity between teachers and students and amongst the students themselves.\nEngagement: students are most engaged by content they have created themselves\nDialogic processes: learning is social and dialogic, where knowledge is co-constructed\nScaffolded conversations: learning takes place through conversations, where the learner and teacher co-construct the knowledge and skills\nEmergence: language and grammar emerge from the learning process. This is seen as distinct from the ‘acquisition’ of language.\nAffordances: the teacher’s role is to optimize language learning affordances through directing attention to emergent language.\nVoice: the learner’s voice is given recognition along with the learner’s beliefs and knowledge.\nEmpowerment: students and teachers are empowered by freeing the classroom of published materials and textbooks.\nRelevance: materials (eg texts, audios and videos) should have relevance for the learners\nCritical use: teachers and students should use published materials and textbooks in a critical way that recognizes their cultural and ideological biases.\n
  • Interactivity: the most direct route to learning is to be found in the interactivity between teachers and students and amongst the students themselves.\nEngagement: students are most engaged by content they have created themselves\nDialogic processes: learning is social and dialogic, where knowledge is co-constructed\nScaffolded conversations: learning takes place through conversations, where the learner and teacher co-construct the knowledge and skills\nEmergence: language and grammar emerge from the learning process. This is seen as distinct from the ‘acquisition’ of language.\nAffordances: the teacher’s role is to optimize language learning affordances through directing attention to emergent language.\nVoice: the learner’s voice is given recognition along with the learner’s beliefs and knowledge.\nEmpowerment: students and teachers are empowered by freeing the classroom of published materials and textbooks.\nRelevance: materials (eg texts, audios and videos) should have relevance for the learners\nCritical use: teachers and students should use published materials and textbooks in a critical way that recognizes their cultural and ideological biases.\n
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  • Interactivity: the most direct route to learning is to be found in the interactivity between teachers and students and amongst the students themselves.\nEngagement: students are most engaged by content they have created themselves\nDialogic processes: learning is social and dialogic, where knowledge is co-constructed\nScaffolded conversations: learning takes place through conversations, where the learner and teacher co-construct the knowledge and skills\nEmergence: language and grammar emerge from the learning process. This is seen as distinct from the ‘acquisition’ of language.\nAffordances: the teacher’s role is to optimize language learning affordances through directing attention to emergent language.\nVoice: the learner’s voice is given recognition along with the learner’s beliefs and knowledge.\nEmpowerment: students and teachers are empowered by freeing the classroom of published materials and textbooks.\nRelevance: materials (eg texts, audios and videos) should have relevance for the learners\nCritical use: teachers and students should use published materials and textbooks in a critical way that recognizes their cultural and ideological biases.\n
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  • there are many more sources from which we can and do pull in content from variety of sources – current, has currency with learners, too (= motivating) as is relevant to them\n fresh, flexible and dynamic\n addressing the needs of each individual learner\n working together with colleagues\n
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  • Making it relevant: Dogme, the Web and business English materials

    1. 1. Making it relevant: Dogme, the Web and business English materials Nick Robinson, York TESOL France 5th November 2011
    2. 2. @nmkrobinson
    3. 3. A career though Dogme
    4. 4. "The Thornbury/Meddings - Soars Continuum" ©
    5. 5. Some definitionsDogme / Web 2.0Teachingunplugged
    6. 6. “Dogme language teaching is considered to beboth a methodology and a movement. Dogme isa communicative approach to language teachingthat encourages teaching without publishedtextbooks and focuses instead onconversational communication among learnersand teacher.”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogme_language_teaching
    7. 7. “The common conception (or misconception)is that unplugged teaching requireseschewing all forms of convenience, such ascoursebooks, broadband internet access,mobile devices, Web 2.0 tools etc.”http://teachertrainingunplugged.wordpress.com/2011/05/16/tdsig-unplugged-countdown-five/
    8. 8. Language learning and use are situated,contextualised, social and personalised... ...andthis should reflect on the way that we teach it.http://iasku.wordpress.com/2011/06/08/scott-
    9. 9. ... it’s all “about teaching thatfocuses on emergent language”(Meddings & Thornbury, 2009,p.8).
    10. 10. A Web 2.0 site allows users to interact andcollaborate with each other in a socialmedia dialogue as creators (prosumers)of user-generated content in a virtualcommunity, in contrast to websites whereusers (consumers) are limited to thepassive viewing of content that wascreated for them.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0
    11. 11. The Web started out as a ‘pipe’.
    12. 12. Where did Web content come from?Top-down, expert-created, static, passively consumed
    13. 13. The web has evolved into a platform ...where we all work together to create, share, discuss, learn.
    14. 14. How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    15. 15. How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    16. 16. How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    17. 17. How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    18. 18. How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    19. 19. How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    20. 20. How is Web content generated now?Bottom-up, active user-generated, dynamic content
    21. 21. Facebook use in France
    22. 22. Facebook use in France 23,190,260 users
    23. 23. Facebook use in France 23,190,260 users 51.97% of online population
    24. 24. Facebook use in France 23,190,260 users 51.97% of online population 35.80% of total population
    25. 25. Facebook use in France 23,190,260 users 51.97% of online population 35.80% of total population 49% male / 51% female
    26. 26. What do Dogme and Web 2.0 have in common?
    27. 27. A Web 2.0 site / An unplugged classroomallows users to interact and collaborate witheach other in a [social media] dialogue ascreators (prosumers) of user-generated contentin a [virtual] community, in contrast towebsites / coursebook-led classrooms whereusers (consumers) are limited to the passiveviewing of content that was created for them.Adapted fromhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0
    28. 28. The ten key principles of Dogme(Thornbury, Scott [2005])
    29. 29. Group taskDiscuss the following questions: What does this principle mean in relation to Dogme? Is this principle also apparent in Web 2.0? If so, how? How does/could this principle influence your teaching and your students’ learning? Give examples of classroom activities; use of (published) materials; and Web 2.0 tools.
    30. 30. Four guiding principles (and one law)1. Whoever comes is [sic] the right people.2. Whenever it starts is the right time.3. Whatever happens is the only thing that could have.4. When it’s over, it’s over.5. The “Law of Two Feet”: “If at any time during our time together you find yourself in any situation where you are neither learning nor contributing, use your two feet, go someplace else.”
    31. 31. What does this principle mean in relation to Dogme?Is this principlealso apparent inWeb 2.0? If so,how?How does/could this principle influence yourteaching and your students’ learning? Giveexamples of classroom activities, use of (published)materials, or Web 2.0 tools.
    32. 32. ‘360 °content creation’ Student Publisher School Business Teacher World
    33. 33. Stay in touch!nick@english360.com@nmkrobinsonenglish360.com
    34. 34. Merci et au revoir!
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