Econosystemics

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A introduction to Econosystemics, a discipline of study that combines economics with global ecology in pursuit of sustainability.

A introduction to Econosystemics, a discipline of study that combines economics with global ecology in pursuit of sustainability.

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  • 1. ECONOSYSTEMICS Reframing Economics for Sustainability Bryan K. Long Editor / Author / Activist ECONOSYSTEMICS.COM
  • 2. ECONOSYSTEM
    • A dynamic system of value transformations and transactions encompassing human society and the global ecosystem.
      • Dynamic: Energy dissipating; changing with time
      • System: Organized interacting components (sub-systems)
      • Value: Usefulness to a system’s maintenance, growth, or development
  • 3. Economics
    • e-kə- ˈ nä-miks a social science concerned chiefly with description and analysis of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services
    • Alternative framing: The analysis and modeling of value creation, exchange and consumption within human society.
    (Miriam Webster Dictionary)
  • 4. Value
    • Value depends on context.
    • Yet we quantify it every time we buy or sell.
    • Implicitly what we are trying to measure with GDP: how much value did our economy create?
    • Negative value: An interaction that diminishes the net value in a system
  • 5. Productivity
    • The use of time, energy, capital, labor, biological systems and material resources to create value.
    • Efficiency : Using less time, energy, capital, labor, biological systems and/or material resources to create the same amount of value.
  • 6. Distribution and Marketing
    • Distribution : The delivery of value from the time and place of creation to the time and place of value.
    • Marketing : Effort to create a context in which the perception of value is high.
  • 7. Money
    • A measurement scale for the quantification of value
    • A future “call” on value from any participant in the monetary system.
  • 8. Ecology
    • i- ˈ kä-lə-jē 1: a branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their environments 2: the totality or pattern of relations between organisms and their environment
    • Alternative framing: The analysis, decription and modeling of an ecosystem .
    • [Ecosystem: a system of biological species within a geophysical environment]
    (Miriam Webster Dictionary)
  • 9. The Human “Footprint”
    • Land : Mostly cities, agriculture and pasturage
    • Ocean : Fish stocks plummeting
    • Rainforests : Disappearing
    • Arctic : Melting
    • Biodiversity : Greatest extinction event in 65 M years
    The Earth at Night
  • 10. Modern Economics
  • 11. Modern Economics Natural Resources
  • 12. Modern Reality
  • 13. Econosystemics Energy Geophysical Systems Biological Systems Human Systems Value Impact Impact
  • 14. Econosystemics
    • i- ˈ kä-nō-sis-təm-iks
    • Broader discipline encompassing macroeconomics and planetary ecology.
    • “ Natural world” includes us.
    • Value flows in both directions.
    • Sustainable human civilization can only be modeled within this larger context.
  • 15. Sustainability
    • Material resource flow must be circular
    • Value flow must be circular
    • Waste must be minimized
    • Energy must be “renewable”
    • Efficiency knowledge must be shared
    • “ Negative Value” activities must be eliminated
      • Pollution
      • Ecosystem destruction
      • War
      • Social oppression
  • 16. Econosystemics Challenges
    • Mapping whole-planet energy and resource flows
    • Modeling multi-species interactions
    • Characterizing/quantifying non-monetary value and negative-value transactions
    • Reconciling present-value and future-value
    • Reconciling human-value and inherent-value perspectives
  • 17. Social Challenges
    • Kicking the fossil fuel habit
    • Letting go of exploitive consumption, and adopting cooperative development.
    • Transcending tribal conflict
    • Being able to see the big picture
    • Developing pervasive social responsibility
    • Stopping population growth
  • 18. Sustainable Development
    • It’s not about going back to the farm.
    • There is a difference between growth and development.
    • Quality of life is about food, water, shelter, education, rights and opportunities
    • Total recycling can give us plenty of resources. Solar, wind, geothermal and advanced nuclear technologies can give us plenty of energy.
    • But we have to get from here to there.
  • 19. ECONOSYSTEMICS
    • Econosystemics is about finding our way to a sustainable future.
    • For More Information and Links, visit:
    • http://www. econosystemics .com
    Reframing Economics for Sustainability