Webinar on Insider's Insight into NFC

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This webinar organized by Endeavour - The Mobility Company focuses on "Insider's Insight into Near Field Communication, also popularly known as NFC". For more details on mobility, visit: www.techendeavour.com

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  • Ok getting started! This is Insider Insight in to Near Field ComputingLet me set a context around the term NEAR FIELD COMPUTINGYou know about using blutooth it’s a
  • .I want to thank Techendeavour for this opportunity to host Webinar so we call all keep up with the up with the quickly changing trends in using near field communication mobile payment technology.I want to thank you for dedicating some of your time this morning to listen to this webinar as I know you’re all extremely busy this time of year and yet you’re interested in learning how Near Field Computing technology works and the new business opportunities becoming available.I want Personally speaking I’m fascinated this topic and hope you feel the same way.Section I: Introduction to Near Field Communication (NFC) -Section II: NFC Ecosystem (think stakeholders) with focus on NFC Enabled Smartphone DevicesSection III: NFC Use CasesSection IV: Guidelines & Consideration for you to consider when thinking about an NFC app development strategySection V: Future of NFC
  • I want to set a context for how NFC be used then get into the technical aspects.Think about all the little things you carry in your wallet – credit cards, health cards, loyalty cards – Now let me ask you this Do you think your mobile phone will become your virtual wallet?So let me tell you a story that exemplifies what this may look like in your future:Use Case Details As per above diagramLet’s take my friend friend Mike gets on a train to go to his office.He sees a poster announcing a free concert this evening. He touches his NFC Mobile Phone to the NFC mark on the poster and transfers the detailed information onto his phone. He reserves seats for the concert with his mobile phone, using mobile communications (e.g., SMS, internet, packet-based connections), to receive thecomplimentary tickets. He sends a text message to his wife to invite her to the concert and dinner.When he arrives at his office, he touches his NFC Mobile Phone to the office gate and opens the door.At lunch time, he pays for his meal using one of the credit cards stored in his phoneusing NFC tap-and-go at the POS register in the cafeteriaAfter lunch, he visits the office of his new business partner for a meeting. Those attending the meeting exchange their business cards stored in their NFC Mobile Phones by touching their phones together.He meets his wife at 6 PM, and they go to the concert venue. He touches his NFC Mobile Phone to a turnstile at the entrance to the concert, their reservations are confirmed, and they are admitted.They visit a shopping center after the concert, where they go shopping and have dinner.When they arrive at their house, he realizes that he has left his NFC Mobile Phone on the train. He immediately calls the mobile network operator and makes a request to disable all active NFC services in the phone. If his NFC Mobile Phone is later found, he will be able to reactivate these services.Alright so let’s move on to how NFC works
  • Talk to the slide – note if you’re familiar with RFID technology you’ll see there is some similarity – on NFC has considerably more capabilities due to it’s two way nature.NFC IntroductionIts a standards-based wireless communication technologySmall operating distance at around 10 cmBased on RFID technology at 13.56 MHzData exchange rate up to 424 Kbits/secondNFC is distinguished by its intuitive interface and its ability to enable largely proprietary wireless networking platforms to interoperate in a seamless manner.NFC is compatible with, and incorporates a range of existing RFID standards providing interoperability with contactless payments and ticketing infrastructure.The primary uses of NFC are to:Connect electronic devices, such as wireless components in a home office system or a headset with a mobile phoneAccess digital content, using a wireless device such as a mobile phone to read a “smart” poster embedded with an RF tagMake contactless transactions, including those for payment, access and ticketingSTOP HERENFC HistoryRFID has restriction that it is a one-way communication standard; from the code to the reader.This restriction was resolved in the 1990’s with new NFC standard which was jointly developed by Philips and Sony. But this standard was only acknowledged by the ISO organization in 2003 and from that moment became an open standard for two way contactless communications.The critical developments of two-way communications, faster data transfer speed and increased data security have made an explosive growth in the use of contactless technology for payments. However, because of the interactive communication opportunities offered by the two-way capabilities of NFC, this technology only offers its full potential when used with an interactive device such as a mobile phone.
  • There are different ways or Modes operation that can be programmed into a NFC applicationNFC Operating ModesReader ModeAccess information on the move like content distribution, information access, think of it as smart advertising (think of examples here) TAP and GO …The NFC device is capable of reading NFC Forum mandated tag types, such as in the scenario of reading an NFC Smartposter tag. The reader/writer mode is on the RF interface compliant to the ISO 14443 and the contactless RFID smart card standard call Felcity card or FeliCa schemesNFC Card Emulation Mode – (This is secure mode)Make contactless transactions like mobile payment, ticketing, access control, transit, top-ups, toll-gateThe NFC device itself acts as an NFC tag, appearing to an external reader much the same as a traditional contactless smart card. This enables contactless payments and eticketing, for example.Peer-to-Peer (P2P) Mode Communication connectivity like data transfer, fast, easy and convenient device association, setup & configurationTwo NFC devices can exchange data. For example, you can share Bluetooth or WiFi link set up parameters, and exchange data such as virtual business cards or digital photos. Peer-to-Peer mode is standardized on the ISO/IEC 18092 standard.
  • How doesNFC compares to the other short-range communication technologies? The above table provides a quick comparison:When compared to the other short-range radio technologies, NFC is extremely short ranged and what I call people-centric. Some of the other short-range communication technologies have similar characteristics, for example RFID, while others are completely different yet complimentary to NFC; for example Bluetooth and Infrared.A good scenario of such compliment is the combination of NFC and Bluetooth, where NFC is used for pairing (authenticating) a Bluetooth session used for the transfer of data.
  • So let’s summarize the Benefits here … You may be sitting there wondering WHY Would I need this? We’ll be talking about that shortly.Intuitive: NFC interactions require no more than a simple touch.Security-ready: NFC has built-in capabilities to support secure applications.Versatile: NFC is ideally suited to the broadest range of industries, environments, and uses.Technology-enabling: NFC facilitates fast and simple setup of wireless technologies, such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi.Interoperable: NFC works with existing contactless card technologies.Inherently secure: NFC transmissions are short range (from a touch to a few centimeters).Open and standards-based: The underlying layers of NFC technology follow universally implemented ISO, ECMA, and ETSI standards.
  • A NFC enabled phone is only part of a bigger picture or ecosystem of interconnections of devices and stakeholders that are needed to make it all work – each stakeholder having their own motivations for allowing use of NFC capabilities
  • NFC Ecosystem which shows different stakeholders which includes ecosystem players and players who provides key functionalities for this ecosystem like TSM(Trusted Service Manager) and MNO (Mobile Network Operator)
  • NFC EcosystemAs shown by the arrows in the diagram, the current contactless business domain is expanding into domains including NFC mobile business opportunities.In some mass market businesses such as transport or payment, a contactless infrastructure already exists in a growing number of schemes, and users have some experience with those contactless services.The NFC Mobile Phone will enhance these existing services and provide opportunities for new revenue sources.The NFC Mobile Ecosystem can be built as a new marketplace, and its success depends on the win-win relationships among all the stakeholders.The NFC Mobile Ecosystem extends the current contactless ecosystem model with additional functionality.
  • NFC Smart phone Devices - HighlightsMore than 20 mobile phone manufacturers are currently producing or rumored to be in preproduction of NFC-enabled handsetsGoogle released the Android NFC APIs to developers, sparking an initiative to create NFC applicationsDifferent development possibilities, combined with Google’s growth rate and market share, the acquisition of Motorola Mobility, and the addition of card emulation by Google, represent perfect conditions for massive market expansionSamsung leads the pack of NFC enabled handsets with Android and Bada OS devices like Galaxy S II and S5230 (marketed under various names depending on the country), Galaxy Nexus, Wave 578
  • Let’s cover one vendor in more detail – RIMBlackBerry Bold 9900 and BlackBerry Curve 9360 Are World's First SIM-Based Smartphones to Receive MasterCard PayPass Handset Certification BlackBerry NFC phone users are set to be the first to use their mobile instead of their work ID badge to access buildings and other physical and online facilities, RIM and ID card giant HID Global have revealed.NO TO TALK MORE ABOUT ABOUT RIM’s perspective I’ll hand the next couple of slides to RAO
  • Let’s talk more about various ways we can use NFC
  • NFC can be used for a wide variety of mobile applications, including:Making payments with a wave or a touch anywhere contactless card point-of-sale (POS) readers have been deployedReading information and “picking up” special offers, coupons and discounts from smart posters or smart billboardsStoring tickets for transportation, parking access or eventsStoring personal information that will allow secure building accessUse Case Details As per above diagramMike gets on a train to go to his office.He sees a poster announcing a free concert this evening. He touches his NFC Mobile Phone to the NFC mark on the poster and transfers the detailed information onto his phone. He reserves seats for the concert with his mobile phone, using mobile communications (e.g., SMS, internet, packet-based connections), and the complimentary tickets are sent to his mobile phone. He sends a text message to his wife to invite her to the concert and dinner.When he arrives at his office, he touches his NFC Mobile Phone to the office gate and opens the door.At lunch time, he pays for his meal using one of the credit cards stored in his phone.After lunch, he visits the office of his new business partner for a meeting. Those attending the meeting exchange their business cards stored in their NFC Mobile Phones by touching their phones together.He meets his wife at 6 PM, and they go to the concert venue. He touches his NFC Mobile Phone to a turnstile at the entrance to the concert, their reservations are confirmed, and they are admitted.They visit a shopping center after the concert, where they go shopping and have dinner.When they arrive at their house, he realizes that he has left his NFC Mobile Phone on the train. He immediately calls the mobile network operator and makes a request to disable all active NFC services in the phone. If his NFC Mobile Phone is later found, he will be able to reactivate these services.
  • There is often confusion and overlap between a mobile payment, mobile banking, and the use of the mobile phone to simply order goods or receive delivery while paying by other means. Below is the correct definition of Mobile Payment Mobile payment: a payment, defined as a transfer of funds in return for a good or service, where the mobile phone is involved in both the initiation and confirmation of the payment. The location of the payer and supporting infrastructure is not important: he may or may not be ‘mobile’ or ‘on the move’ or at a Point of Sale (PoS); the payment may be processed by credit cards or by a prepaid wallet. Example: funds are transferred and deducted from the prepaid amount or billed by the MNO.Mobile Payment - Stakeholder ExpectationConsumer ExpectationsPersonalized serviceMinimal learning curveTrust, privacy and securityUbiquitous – anywhere, anytime and any currencyLow or zero cost of usageInteroperability between different network operators, banks and devicesAnonymity of payments like cashPeer to peer transfersMerchantFaster transaction timeLow or zero cost in using the systemIntegration with existing payment systemsHigh securityBeing able to customize the serviceReal time status of the mobile payment serviceBanksNetwork operator independent solutionsPayment applications designed by the bankExceptional branding opportunities for banksBetter volumes in banking – more card payments and less cash transactionsCustomer loyaltyTelecom network providersGenerating new income by increase in trafficIncreased Average Revenue Per User (ARPU) and reduced churn (increased loyalty)Become an attractive partner to content providersMobile Device ManufacturerLarge market adoption with embedded mobile payment applicationIncrease in Average Revenue Per User (ARPU)GovernmentRevenue through taxation of m-paymentsStandardsFraud managementMobile Payment - BenefitsReduce cost and cash usageServe under-banked geographiesNetwork Operators ROI through increase in air-time and data usageExtra revenue through mobile paymentsPossible diversification into other areas of the consumer’s needs and lifestyleMerchantsFaster throughput at the checkoutSend real time marketing messagesConsumerMobile device fulfills multi functionsConvenience
  • Introduction Google Wallet is a free Android app that turns your mobile phone into your virtual wallet, so you can tap, pay, and save using virtual versions of your Citi® MasterCard® with PayPass™ and amazing deals from Google Offers in the near future.At launch, Google Wallet will be compatible with the Nexus S 4G by Google, available on Sprint. Over time, we plan on expanding support to more phones and additional card issuers.Currently, MasterCard PayPass is available at over 140,000 merchants across the United StatesDown the line, your phone with Google Wallet will be the one thing that holds everything you need to carry - paper excluded, of course. Eventually your loyalty cards, gift cards, receipts, boarding passes, tickets, even your keys will be seamlessly synced to your Google Wallet. And every offer and loyalty point will be redeemed automatically with a single tap of your phone to the payment terminal.Tap and PayGoogle Wallet uses contactless payment technology to securely transfer your payment credentials via near field communication (NFC).SaveYou’ll be able to complete transactions with Google Wallet, all while redeeming discounts with Google Offers at the same time.Free to UseYou would think consolidating your wallet into your phone would cost something, right? No way! Google Wallet is free to use. However, there may be fees associated with using the cards loaded in Google Wallet.
  • Medical cardsThe Medical cards stored in the NFC mobile phone (or NFC-card) of a patient makes it possible for a doctor to quickly access a patient's details such as the patient's personal information, disease, treatment undergone and a history of all the treatments.It can also be used for medical insurance coverage, billing and payment of insurance premiums, in which the medical insurance card will be stored in the user's NFC phone. It allows a user to pay for his medical treatments by swiping the card over the Terminal.NFC Use cases in healthcarePaymentPay with NFC phones at contactless POSInformation GatheringUse NFC phones to read patient history from smart card or phone-to-phoneAccessEnsure secure hospital area access for personnel with NFC phone and contactless readerAsset ManagementUse NFC phones to read smart tags on prescriptions to track inventoryReportingUse NFC phones to track patient visitsRecord activities performed by health care workers with NFC devices and smart tagsOtherConfiguring a telematics infrastructureImproving treatment qualityDigitizing information and therefore saving paperSimplifying and streamlining administration processesReducing misuse by all participants in the health servicesReferences:http://www.nfc-forum.org/events/oulu_spotlight/Forum_and_Use_Cases.pdfhttp://www.gi-de.com/en/products_and_solutions/products/healthcare_cards_1/Electronic-Healthcare-Cards-4356.jsphttp://www.gi-de.com/en/products_and_solutions/solutions/ehealth/e-health.jsphttp://searchhealthit.techtarget.com/healthitexchange/meaningfulhealthcareinformaticsblog/nfc-technology-and-its-impact-on-healthcare/http://www.nfcworld.com/2011/10/11/310605/patientid-plus-uses-nfc-to-speed-up-medical-administration/http://nfcme.com/patientid-speeds-up-medical-administration-process-with-nfc/
  • Imagine NO Check out line (everThe cornerstone of the new NFC-based retail solution is the checkout and payment process, where most benefits can be realized. To reach the targeted results solution will support connectivity to other NFC devices, such as a smart shopping cart, and also leverage the integrated security architecture.How NFC works in Retail SolutionProduct data of smart tagged merchandize will be captured by a smart shopping cart, being connected to the back office system of the store. Here the EPC product information is turned into pricing information and is returned to the cart or the customer’s handset.Customer performs payment either directly to the shopping cart or at special payment terminals anywhere in the stores.The payment information is transmitted to the back office system and also to the integrated security system of the store.After the payment customer may leave the store without any further personal interaction.When exiting, the smart tags are going to be deactivated by the security gates.BenefitsAs a result of the new check-out and payment solution, crowded check-out counters can be avoided improving customer satisfaction and also increasing store capacity. With the proposed NFC-based logistics the check-out and payment transaction becomes and individual activity, eliminating the need for staying in line, and the long wait till others finish their own transactions.NFC-enabled mobile handsets will also support functions such as loyalty applications, product authentication, capturing product information, etc.Source http://www.stolpan.com/index.phpStoLPaN (‘Store Logistics and Payment with NFC’) is a pan-European consortium supported by the European Commission’s Information Society Technologies program. StoLPaN will examine the as yet untapped potential for the new kind of local wireless interface, NFC and mobile communication.
  • Purpose is this summary?
  • When you begin thinking about a mobile app strategy that incorporates NFC you can use these general guidelines to refine your thinking process.Would your app be more useful if you could speed up transaction time?Would you benefit or use interoperability
  • There are 7 Commonly known threats to NFC security are:Eavesdropping, where the third party receiving a signal using the antennaUnwanted activation, which is somewhat similar to eavesdropping. Third party attacker tries to activate the card without the owner’s knowledgeData Corruption, or modifying the data which was transmitted using NFC device using the valid frequencyData Modification, where the attacker is sending valid, but altered data to the receiving NFC deviceData Insertion, where attacker tries to insert a new message into a NFC communicationMan-in-The-Middle-Attack, where two parties who want to establish communication are tricked into communicating with or via the third party which is therefore enabled to record the entire conversationDenial of service, where the attacker tries to interfere with the RF field, in order to prevent the transactionThe point here is you will need to research of of these threats to see how they might be used to compromise a NFC enabled smartphone and app.
  • And finally moving on to the Future of NFC
  • Source: https://www.gplus.com/Mobile-Payments/Insight/INFOGRAPHIC-Goodbye-Wallets-How-Mobile-PaymentsWe know that mobile payments are redefining commerce, but will our phones soon replace our wallets?PayPal seems to think so. The payments giant boldly predicts that the wallet will be dead by 2015. It’s putting its money where its mouth is: It recently acquired mobile payments provider Zong for $240 million.Google recently launched Google Wallet, the search giant’s mobile payment systemVisa recently made a strategic investment in Square, the mobile payments platform now worth more than $1.4 billion.Mobile payment transactions already total $240 billion annually, but that's just the tip of the iceberg. Juniper Research reports that the market will grow 2x to 3x in the next 5 years.The race is on between mobile technology companies to get their devices to market, but who will be the dominant provider in the mobile payment space?
  • Any gadget that you can put this NFC chip on is a potential use caseUSB Drives - The SD Association, which is a standardization body for the SD memory cards, is planning to devise a standard to insert NFC chips in the next generation of SD and microSD cards. Technically this is already been done by companies like Netcom, but having a standard means future products will be uniform and play well with others.The development of such smart-chip technology to be inserted into SD cards will be done in partnership with GlobalPlatform, which standardizes secure application management.Deploying a universal mobile payment system might have a lot to do with the SIM card that resides inside our phones, as it turns out. The GSMA announced today that 45 of the world's largest wireless carriers are in favor of a SIM-based NFC solution, and have committed to support and implement related products and services.SD cards are so mobile -
  • NFC Future Use casesPaymentAdd and use a prepaid gift card in an NFC phoneLoyalty/ CouponingAdd or redeem points with NFC POS and NFC phoneDownload coupons from smart poster to NFC phoneP2P - transfer coupon to friend, recommend productsRedeem / send coupons between NFC phone and POSInformation GatheringRead product history / warnings from tag to NFC phoneTouch tags to collect shopping listTouch a tag and opt-in to get SMS store or mall offers (tracks customer entry as well)Asset ManagementUse NFC phones to read smart tags per productMore…Collect deposit from bottle recycling machineActivate electronic devices after purchaseSource: NFC Forum
  • I want to give this over to the Technical Team now for Questions --
  • Webinar on Insider's Insight into NFC

    1. 1. Insider’s Insight into NFCEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    2. 2. Agenda > Section I: Introduction to Near Field Communication (NFC) > Section II: NFC Ecosystem with focus on NFC Enabled Smartphone Devices > Section III: NFC Use Cases > Section IV: Guidelines & Considerations > Section V: Future of NFC Key Highlights > BlackBerry Speaker --- Pradeep Rao, Alliances Solutions Manager, RIMEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    3. 3. Section I: Intro to Near Field CommunicationEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    4. 4. What is NFC – Near Field Communication? NFC allows for a NFC requires an The initiator generates The Target Picks up simple data exchange initiator and a target a Radio Frequency the RF field and between two devices (RF) field with a range receives the data it by way of a physical of about 4cm. contains touch.Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    5. 5. NFC – Operating Modes Contactless Card NFC NFC Device Device NFC NFC Device Contactless Device Reader Reader Mode Card Emulation Mode Peer-to-Peer ModeEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011 Source: SpringCard
    6. 6. NFC v/s Short Range Comm. Tech. NFC RFID IrDa Bluetooth Set up Time <0.1ms <0.1ms ~0.5s ~6s Range Up to 10cm Up to 3m Up to 5m Up to 30m Usability Human centric, Easy, Item centric, Easy Data centric, Easy Data centric, Medium Intuitive, Fast Selectivity High, Given, Security Partly given Line of Sight Who are you Pay, get access, share, Use Cases Item tracking Control and exchange Network for data initiate service, easy set data exchange, headset up Consumer Touch, Wave, Simply Get information Easy Configuration needed Experience connectEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011 Source: NFC Forum
    7. 7. NFC - Benefits + Intuitive + Security Ready + Versatile + Technology Enabling + Interoperable + Inherently Secure + Open & Standard BasedEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    8. 8. Section II: NFC Ecosystem with focus on NFC Enabled Smartphone DevicesEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    9. 9. Trusted NFC Eco System Service Source: NFC Forum Manager Mobile Service Network Provisioning Provisioning Users Key Functionalities Ecosystem Players Component Handset Chipset + Tag Manufacturer Manufacturer ManufacturerEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011 Source: NFC Forum
    10. 10. Trusted NFC Mobile Business Opportunity Service Source: NFC Forum Manager Mobile Network Service Provisioning Provisioning Users Current Contactless Business Key Functionalities Ecosystem Players Component Handset Chipset + Tag Manufacturer Manufacturer ManufacturerEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    11. 11. NFC Smartphone Devices • Android Gingerbread and Ice Cream Sandwich supports NFC • Samsung leads the pack of NFC enabled devices • BlackBerry Tag will come as part of the next BlackBerry 7 update • Apple, Sony Ericsson, HTC and LG are speculated to be considering NFC Samsung Samsung Nokia C7 Blackberry Galaxy SII Galaxy Nexus Bold 9900Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    12. 12. NFC & Blackberry > NFC enabled devices > Bold 9900/9930 and Curve 9350/9360/9370 BlackBerry Tag Service Its part of BlackBerry 7 update … > Developers will have access to Tag API Users can share photos, documents, URLs and contact info MasterCard recently approved two BlackBerry models (Bold 9900 and Curve 9360) for its Pay Pass program …Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    13. 13. NFC From RIM Perspective • NFC embedded Smartphones CAGR 2010 – 2015: 200%” • Major handset manufacturers and operating systems suppliers are committed to delivering mobile devices with the built-in ability to deliver NFC functionality • Consumers equipped with an NFC-enabled device will be able to use it to access a wide range of applications — from payments to discount coupons, access control to transport ticketing and beyond • Phones using NFC as a payment technology are neither new, nor solely a product of the US market. NFC trials in Europe and Asia-Pacific have netted very positive consumer response. The United States brings to the equation a large addressable market willing to deploy embedded NFC in a standardized format.Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    14. 14. NFC From RIM Perspective Access Control (Handheld Support) BlackBerry Accessories (Pairing / Streaming Control) (Intelligent Modes) Payment , Loyalty, Gift Card, Coupon, Ticketing (Handheld Support) NFC Tags, Smart Posters (e.g. Marketing)Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    15. 15. Section III: NFC Use Cases … …Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    16. 16. NFC Mobile Application Use Cases Station Store Theatre / Airport Vehicle Office / Restaurant / Stadium Anywhere Gate pass Personalize Enter/exit office Pay by credit Pass entrance Download & personalize Mobile Phones Seat position Card application Usage of NFC Get info from Exchange business Get event info Smart poster Use to represent Cards Get loyalty points Check usage history Driver’s license Get info from Log into PC Get & use coupon Download ticket Information kiosk Pay parking fee Print using copier Share info & coupon Lock phone remotely Pay bus/taxi fee machine Among users Industries Mass & public Drivers & Security Banking Entertainment Any Transport Vehicle services Service Retail Advertising Credit Card Source: NFC ForumEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    17. 17. NFC Business Opportunity > Mobile Payment > Healthcare (Medical Card) > Retail (Smart Shopping Cart)Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    18. 18. NFC in Mobile Payment Mobile payment A transfer of funds in return for a good or service, where the mobile phone is involved in both the initiation and confirmation of the payment. (Source: Innopay) Key StakeholdersEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    19. 19. Popular Example For Mobile Payment using NFCEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    20. 20. NFC in Healthcare: Medical Cards & Patient IDs Health Cards can store patients key health factors like blood group, age, health insurance coverage and so on. Health Cards: > Reduces patient stress during emergencies for Medical Reimbursement (insurance coverage), Billing and Payment of Insurance premium. > Easy and instant access of patient’s vital health factors instantly when required. > Easily updatable > Reduces misuse/frauds by all participants in the health servicesEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    21. 21. NFC in Retail Reading product info Smart shopping cart Tagger (reads tags, merchandise communicates with Customer mobile over NFC) enters retail store. NFC embedded handset Sending payment Sending payment Tag info to back office info to security killed in store system Customer leaving store Retrieving pricing without personal info interactionEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    22. 22. Section IV: NFC Guidelines & ConsiderationsEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    23. 23. NFC Application Guidelines & Considerations Faster Interoperability Integration with Follow regulatory Should address Switching between transaction between devices, existing payment norms for mobile security and privacy reader/writer time tags and standards systems payments concerns modes without lagEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    24. 24. NFC Security Challenges > Eavesdropping > Unwanted activation > Data Corruption > Data Modification > Data Insertion > Man-in-The-Middle-Attack > Denial of serviceEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    25. 25. Section V: Future of NFC……………………..……….Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    26. 26. Future of NFC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2014 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2015 Sales of NFC equipped phones NFC transactions alone will The value of all mobile money will exceed $75 billion. approach $50 billion. transactions is expected to reach $670 billion. 1 in 5 cell phones worldwide Google predicts that 50% of cell will use NFC technology. phones will use NFC technology. Digital goods will make up nearly 40% of this market. Asia, Western Europe and North America will be responsible for 75% of all mobile payment transactions.Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011 Source: G+
    27. 27. Future of NFC: Technical Perspective > New standards to embed NFC chips into SD or Micro SD cards > New type of NFC tags which can store more data > NFC enabled SIM cards > SIM-based NFC payment solutionEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    28. 28. What Next? ………………….………... > Many real-life scenarios can be adapted to NFC such as Integration of id-cards, passports, finger-prints, driver-license > Storage area for critical information to provide user’s privacy and authorizing people to access those information > Secure exchange of critical data > Storing tickets for transportation, parking access or eventsEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    29. 29. Any Questions?Endeavour Software Technologies © 2011
    30. 30. Thank you! US: +1 512 464 1218 UK: +44 20 7193 0986 India: +91 80 4288 5500 info@techendeavour.com www.techendeavour.comEndeavour Software Technologies © 2011

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