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Celebrating Men:Celebrating Men:Commemorating the 50thCommemorating the 50thAnniversaryAnniversaryof the March onof the Ma...
The 1963 March on washingtonThe 1963 March on washingtonA Historical PerspectiveA Historical Perspective
Movement SponsorsMovement Sponsors• Negro American Labor CouncilNegro American Labor Council• Southern Christian Leadershi...
Negro American Labor CouncilNegro American Labor CouncilThe first among equals in terms of originating and organizing the ...
SCLC, SNCC, CORE, NAACPSCLC, SNCC, CORE, NAACP& the Urban League& the Urban LeagueWhile the March on Washington was concei...
Movement FlashpointsMovement Flashpoints• Montgomery, Alabama – 1955 to 1956Montgomery, Alabama – 1955 to 1956• Greensboro...
MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA:MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA:1955 – 19561955 – 1956On December 5, 1955, Montgomery, Alabama became the firstOn ...
Greensboro, North Carolina:Greensboro, North Carolina:February 1, 1960February 1, 1960After the 1956 victory in Montgomery...
Albany, Georgia: 1961 - 1962Albany, Georgia: 1961 - 1962Albany is located in rural southwest Georgia, which in 1957 became...
Birmingham, Alabama:Birmingham, Alabama:March – May 1963March – May 1963On January 10, 1963, Dr. King and his top aides me...
Washington, DC: August 28,1963Washington, DC: August 28,1963The two primary forces behind the March on Washington were A. ...
Selma, Alabama:Selma, Alabama:February - March 1965February - March 1965In March 1965, SCLCIn March 1965, SCLC’’s James Be...
The Diaspora todayThe Diaspora todaySome Sobering StatisticsSome Sobering StatisticsCelebrating Men
High School Completion RateHigh School Completion RateHigh School Graduate or More by Race & GenderUnited States Census Bu...
4 Year College Degree4 Year College DegreeAttained 4 Year College Degree or Moreby Race & GenderUnited States Census Burea...
Relative Earning PowerRelative Earning PowerWage Gap By Gender & RaceHighBeam Research30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%110%1970 19...
Median Household IncomeMedian Household IncomeMedian Household Income by RaceThe US Census - 2012 Statistical Abstract$20,...
UnemploymentUnemployment40 Year Unemployment Trend - Men 20+Bureau of Labor Statistics0%5%10%15%20%25%19721974197619781980...
Incarcerated PopulationIncarcerated PopulationAfrican Americans representAfrican Americans representapproximately 13% of t...
Average Life ExpectancyAverage Life ExpectancyLife Expectancy Trends by Gender & RaceUnited States Census Bureau5560657075...
Our commitment toOur commitment toengageengageCelebrating Men
Emory’Emory’s Strategic Focus Areass Strategic Focus Areasfor Community Transformationfor Community TransformationGrow Chi...
Potential Men’s MinistryPotential Men’s MinistryInitiativesInitiatives• Unpack issues and align our strategyUnpack issues ...
Suggested ReadingSuggested ReadingCelebrating Men
Interested inInterested inGetting Involved?Getting Involved?Learn More:Learn More:http://emoryfellowship.org/connect/mens-...
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Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

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This presentation explores the question: to what extent has Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s DREAM been fulfilled? It includes three sections.
The 1963 March on Washington: A Historical Perspective (Slides 2-12)
The Diaspora Today: Some Sobering Statistics (Slides 13-20)
Our Commitment To Engage (Slides 21-24)

Learn more at http://emoryfellowship.org/connect/mens-ministry/.


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Transcript of "Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington"

  1. 1. Celebrating Men:Celebrating Men:Commemorating the 50thCommemorating the 50thAnniversaryAnniversaryof the March onof the March onWashingtonWashingtonTo What Extent Has The DREAM Been Fulfilled?To What Extent Has The DREAM Been Fulfilled?
  2. 2. The 1963 March on washingtonThe 1963 March on washingtonA Historical PerspectiveA Historical Perspective
  3. 3. Movement SponsorsMovement Sponsors• Negro American Labor CouncilNegro American Labor Council• Southern Christian Leadership Counsel (SCLC)Southern Christian Leadership Counsel (SCLC)• Student Non-Violent Coordinating CommitteeStudent Non-Violent Coordinating Committee(SNCC)(SNCC)• Congress Of Racial Equality (CORE)Congress Of Racial Equality (CORE)• National Association for the Advancement ofNational Association for the Advancement ofColored People (NAACP)Colored People (NAACP)• The Urban LeagueThe Urban LeagueCelebrating Men
  4. 4. Negro American Labor CouncilNegro American Labor CouncilThe first among equals in terms of originating and organizing the March on WashingtonThe first among equals in terms of originating and organizing the March on Washingtonfor Jobs and Freedom was the Negro American Labor Council. A. Philip Randolph,for Jobs and Freedom was the Negro American Labor Council. A. Philip Randolph,longtime labor activist and founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, formedlongtime labor activist and founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, formedthe Negro American Labor Council in May 1960 after the AFL-CIOthe Negro American Labor Council in May 1960 after the AFL-CIO’’s 1959 conventions 1959 conventionfailed to adopt internal desegregation measures. In late January 1963, staff aidesfailed to adopt internal desegregation measures. In late January 1963, staff aidesproposed that Randolph and the NALC sponsor a march inproposed that Randolph and the NALC sponsor a march in ““May 1963May 1963”” focused on thefocused on the““economic subordinationeconomic subordination”” of blacks, arguing that integration without economic equalityof blacks, arguing that integration without economic equalitywould produce limited gains in education, housing, public accommodations, andwould produce limited gains in education, housing, public accommodations, andtransportation. Randolph officially approved the staff report in March 1963, andtransportation. Randolph officially approved the staff report in March 1963, andunsuccessfully lobbied Dr. King, the Urban League and the NAACP to co-sponsor theunsuccessfully lobbied Dr. King, the Urban League and the NAACP to co-sponsor themarch. The NAACP and Urban League rebuffed Randolph due to concerns thatmarch. The NAACP and Urban League rebuffed Randolph due to concerns thatparticipation in the march could jeopardize their tax exempt status. Kingparticipation in the march could jeopardize their tax exempt status. King’’s disinterest,s disinterest,however, was due to his total preoccupation with the Birmingham protest at the time ofhowever, was due to his total preoccupation with the Birmingham protest at the time ofRandolphRandolph’’s outreach. In June 1963, as it became clear that Birmingham was a clears outreach. In June 1963, as it became clear that Birmingham was a clearmovement victory, King reconsidered and became the second major leader to embracemovement victory, King reconsidered and became the second major leader to embracethe March. In mid-June, representatives from SNCC, CORE, the NAACP and the Urbanthe March. In mid-June, representatives from SNCC, CORE, the NAACP and the UrbanLeague signed on, and Randolph was later selected as Director of the march. RandolphLeague signed on, and Randolph was later selected as Director of the march. Randolphtapped Bayard Rustin as his Deputy on July 2, 1963, and Rustin is credited withtapped Bayard Rustin as his Deputy on July 2, 1963, and Rustin is credited withorganizing the march in a little less than two monthsorganizing the march in a little less than two monthsCelebrating Men
  5. 5. SCLC, SNCC, CORE, NAACPSCLC, SNCC, CORE, NAACP& the Urban League& the Urban LeagueWhile the March on Washington was conceived and spearheaded by A. PhilipWhile the March on Washington was conceived and spearheaded by A. PhilipRandolphRandolph’’s Negro American Labor Council, its initial steering committees Negro American Labor Council, its initial steering committeeconsisted of representatives from the Southern Christian Leadership Council,consisted of representatives from the Southern Christian Leadership Council,the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, the Congress of Racialthe Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, the Congress of RacialEquality, the NAACP, and the Urban League. The groups negotiated aEquality, the NAACP, and the Urban League. The groups negotiated aconsensus March agenda that merged NALCconsensus March agenda that merged NALC’’s focus on black economics focus on black economicconditions with the other groupsconditions with the other groups’’ emphasis on pressuring Congress to passemphasis on pressuring Congress to passPresident KennedyPresident Kennedy’’s June 11, 1963, Civil Rights bill. The Harlem baseds June 11, 1963, Civil Rights bill. The Harlem basedFriendship Baptist Church (Rev. Thomas Kilgore) donated office space toFriendship Baptist Church (Rev. Thomas Kilgore) donated office space tomarch organizers. By the time the March had occurred, organizers secured,march organizers. By the time the March had occurred, organizers secured,inter alia, over 400 portable toilets, 21 temporary drinking fountains, 24 first aid-inter alia, over 400 portable toilets, 21 temporary drinking fountains, 24 first aid-stations, a check cashing facility, and 80,000 cheese sandwich lunchesstations, a check cashing facility, and 80,000 cheese sandwich lunchesprepared by Riverside Church in New York. In addition to the Big Six (NALC,prepared by Riverside Church in New York. In addition to the Big Six (NALC,SLCS, SNCC, CORE, NAACP, and the Urban League), representatives fromSLCS, SNCC, CORE, NAACP, and the Urban League), representatives fromlabor (Walter Reuther), and the Protestant (Rev. Eugene Carson Blake), Jewishlabor (Walter Reuther), and the Protestant (Rev. Eugene Carson Blake), Jewish(Rabbi Joachim Prinz), and Catholic (Matthew Ahmann) faith communities were(Rabbi Joachim Prinz), and Catholic (Matthew Ahmann) faith communities wereadded to the planning committee by A. Philip Randolph in August 1963.added to the planning committee by A. Philip Randolph in August 1963.Celebrating Men
  6. 6. Movement FlashpointsMovement Flashpoints• Montgomery, Alabama – 1955 to 1956Montgomery, Alabama – 1955 to 1956• Greensboro, North Carolina – February 1, 1960Greensboro, North Carolina – February 1, 1960• Albany, Georgia – 1961 to 1962Albany, Georgia – 1961 to 1962• Birmingham, Alabama – March to May 1963Birmingham, Alabama – March to May 1963• Washington, DC – August 28, 1963Washington, DC – August 28, 1963• Selma, Alabama – March 1965Selma, Alabama – March 1965Celebrating Men
  7. 7. MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA:MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA:1955 – 19561955 – 1956On December 5, 1955, Montgomery, Alabama became the firstOn December 5, 1955, Montgomery, Alabama became the firstbattleground city in African Americansbattleground city in African Americans’’ strategic campaign to dismantlestrategic campaign to dismantlesegregation. The campaign later became known as the Civil Rightssegregation. The campaign later became known as the Civil RightsMovement, and brought direct non-violent mass action to the doorstepMovement, and brought direct non-violent mass action to the doorstepof the southern white power structure. In Montgomery, Rosa Parksof the southern white power structure. In Montgomery, Rosa Parks’’arrest for refusing to give her seat to a white bus passenger sparked aarrest for refusing to give her seat to a white bus passenger sparked a382 day black boycott that inflicted severe financial harm on the382 day black boycott that inflicted severe financial harm on theMontgomery Bus Line. In lieu of public transportation, the black churchMontgomery Bus Line. In lieu of public transportation, the black churchand business community organized a volunteer carpool system thatand business community organized a volunteer carpool system thattransported blacks to destinations in and around Montgomery for overtransported blacks to destinations in and around Montgomery for overa year. Although a cross-section of black clergy, businesses anda year. Although a cross-section of black clergy, businesses andAlabama State faculty led the boycott, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.Alabama State faculty led the boycott, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.emerged locally and nationally as the groupemerged locally and nationally as the group’’s key strategist ands key strategist andspokesperson. The boycott ended on December 20, 1956, after thespokesperson. The boycott ended on December 20, 1956, after theSupreme Court ruled in Browder v. Gayle that enforced segregation onSupreme Court ruled in Browder v. Gayle that enforced segregation onbuses was unconstitutional.buses was unconstitutional.Celebrating Men
  8. 8. Greensboro, North Carolina:Greensboro, North Carolina:February 1, 1960February 1, 1960After the 1956 victory in Montgomery, Dr. King and various civil rights leadersAfter the 1956 victory in Montgomery, Dr. King and various civil rights leadersstruggled to launch a second battle against segregation. Between 1957-1959,struggled to launch a second battle against segregation. Between 1957-1959,the movement produced only a disastrous voter registration drive, a poorlythe movement produced only a disastrous voter registration drive, a poorlyattended 1957 Prayer March on Washington, and a 1958 Youth March onattended 1957 Prayer March on Washington, and a 1958 Youth March onWashington that was ignored by the media and large segments of the blackWashington that was ignored by the media and large segments of the blackcommunity. The movement appeared to be dead just three years after Dr.community. The movement appeared to be dead just three years after Dr.KingKing’’s emergence as a national figure. The turnaround came in February 1960s emergence as a national figure. The turnaround came in February 1960when four North Carolina A&T students launched thewhen four North Carolina A&T students launched the ““sit-insit-in”” phase of thephase of themovement. The four students refused to leave Woolworthmovement. The four students refused to leave Woolworth’’s lunch counter whens lunch counter whendenied service, and set off a national furor as HBCU students from throughoutdenied service, and set off a national furor as HBCU students from throughoutthe south launched similarthe south launched similar ““sit-inssit-ins”” to support the North Carolina A&T students,to support the North Carolina A&T students,and to protest segregated eating establishments. The sit-ins produced severaland to protest segregated eating establishments. The sit-ins produced severalbattleground victories, including the voluntary integration of lunch counters inbattleground victories, including the voluntary integration of lunch counters inNashville and Atlanta, and peaceful integration of AtlantaNashville and Atlanta, and peaceful integration of Atlanta’’s schools beginning ins schools beginning in1960. The sit-ins also launched the Student Non Violent Coordinating1960. The sit-ins also launched the Student Non Violent CoordinatingCommittee (SNCC), which later played a key role in organizing the 1963 MarchCommittee (SNCC), which later played a key role in organizing the 1963 Marchon Washington.on Washington.Celebrating Men
  9. 9. Albany, Georgia: 1961 - 1962Albany, Georgia: 1961 - 1962Albany is located in rural southwest Georgia, which in 1957 became the firstAlbany is located in rural southwest Georgia, which in 1957 became the firstregion in the country to be sued by the federal government for votingregion in the country to be sued by the federal government for votingdiscrimination. In November 1961, SNCC activist Charles Sherroddiscrimination. In November 1961, SNCC activist Charles Sherrodspearheaded the formation of an alliance between Albany State students, localspearheaded the formation of an alliance between Albany State students, localactivists, SNCC, SCLC and the NAACP to combat racially separate pollingactivists, SNCC, SCLC and the NAACP to combat racially separate pollingplaces, and segregated buses and city facilities (parks, libraries, etc.). Fromplaces, and segregated buses and city facilities (parks, libraries, etc.). FromNovember 1961-October 1962, organizers sustained a series of bus andNovember 1961-October 1962, organizers sustained a series of bus andmerchant boycotts, freedom rides, sit-ins and marches without securing anymerchant boycotts, freedom rides, sit-ins and marches without securing anyconcessions from Albanyconcessions from Albany’’s white leadership. The Albany movement disbandeds white leadership. The Albany movement disbandedin November 1962, without securing a victory. Dr. King later analyzed thein November 1962, without securing a victory. Dr. King later analyzed thedefeat at Albany as stemming from the movementdefeat at Albany as stemming from the movement’’s tactical error of demandings tactical error of demandingtoo broad a set of concessions, and underestimating the power of local whitestoo broad a set of concessions, and underestimating the power of local whitesto resist civil disobedience. Dr. King was criticized severely after Albany, andto resist civil disobedience. Dr. King was criticized severely after Albany, andportrayed as a "has been" leader. In selecting Birmingham as the movementportrayed as a "has been" leader. In selecting Birmingham as the movement’’ssnext battleground city, Dr. King vowed to learn the lessons from Albany.next battleground city, Dr. King vowed to learn the lessons from Albany.POSTSCRIPT: SNCC activist Charles Sherrod later served as an Albany CityPOSTSCRIPT: SNCC activist Charles Sherrod later served as an Albany Citycouncil member from 1976-1990. His wife, Shirley Sherrod, served in thecouncil member from 1976-1990. His wife, Shirley Sherrod, served in theObama administration as the USDA Rural Development Director for GeorgiaObama administration as the USDA Rural Development Director for Georgia..Celebrating Men
  10. 10. Birmingham, Alabama:Birmingham, Alabama:March – May 1963March – May 1963On January 10, 1963, Dr. King and his top aides met for a two-day retreat in Dorchester,On January 10, 1963, Dr. King and his top aides met for a two-day retreat in Dorchester,Georgia. The retreat was for the purpose of analyzing the Albany defeat, and identifyingGeorgia. The retreat was for the purpose of analyzing the Albany defeat, and identifyingthe next battleground city. Dr. King and the Dorchester strategists agreed to organize athe next battleground city. Dr. King and the Dorchester strategists agreed to organize aboycott of downtown Birmingham stores, confident that local black purchasing powerboycott of downtown Birmingham stores, confident that local black purchasing powercould cripple the citycould cripple the city’’s economic power structure. The groups economic power structure. The group’’s goals were to eliminates goals were to eliminatedesegregated stores, unfair hiring practices, and segregated recreational facilities. Indesegregated stores, unfair hiring practices, and segregated recreational facilities. InMarch, Dr. King, the SCLC, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and local activists launched a sevenMarch, Dr. King, the SCLC, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and local activists launched a sevenweek boycott of downtown Birmingham stores. During the seven-week campaign,week boycott of downtown Birmingham stores. During the seven-week campaign,national television audiences witnessed local police chief Bull Connernational television audiences witnessed local police chief Bull Conner’’s forces use polices forces use policedogs and pressurized hoses on protesters. The SCLCdogs and pressurized hoses on protesters. The SCLC’’s ability to sustain the boycott fors ability to sustain the boycott forseven weeks, and the national outrage over Connnerseven weeks, and the national outrage over Connner’’s use of police dogs and hosess use of police dogs and hosesforced Birminghamforced Birmingham’’s business leaders to negotiate with Dr. King. On May 7, 1963, Dr.s business leaders to negotiate with Dr. King. On May 7, 1963, Dr.King announced that the parties had negotiated theKing announced that the parties had negotiated the ““Birmingham Truce AgreementBirmingham Truce Agreement””,,which resulted in the desegregation of downtown stores and lunch counters, the hiring ofwhich resulted in the desegregation of downtown stores and lunch counters, the hiring ofblack employees in downtown stores, and the desegregation of city facilities. The victoryblack employees in downtown stores, and the desegregation of city facilities. The victorywas decisive and quick, but it came with a high price: several months after thewas decisive and quick, but it came with a high price: several months after the ““trucetruce””, a, abomb detonated at Birminghambomb detonated at Birmingham’’s Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, killing four young girlss Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, killing four young girlsattending Sunday school.attending Sunday school.Celebrating Men
  11. 11. Washington, DC: August 28,1963Washington, DC: August 28,1963The two primary forces behind the March on Washington were A. Philip Randolph (andThe two primary forces behind the March on Washington were A. Philip Randolph (andthe Negro American Labor Council) and Dr. King (the SCLC). Randolph conceived thethe Negro American Labor Council) and Dr. King (the SCLC). Randolph conceived theidea in January 1963 and persuaded King to join the effort in June 1963. With Randolphidea in January 1963 and persuaded King to join the effort in June 1963. With Randolphand King on board, a unity breakfast was held on June 19, 1963, in New York city duringand King on board, a unity breakfast was held on June 19, 1963, in New York city duringwhich the Urban League, NAACP, SNCC and CORE agreed to become march co-which the Urban League, NAACP, SNCC and CORE agreed to become march co-conveners. Organizers recruited black police officers from across the country to serve asconveners. Organizers recruited black police officers from across the country to serve asparade marshals, and agreed to prohibit sit-ins and civil disobedience during the march.parade marshals, and agreed to prohibit sit-ins and civil disobedience during the march.Over 200,000 persons attended the March on Washington, a quarter of whom wereOver 200,000 persons attended the March on Washington, a quarter of whom werewhite. Dr. King gave thewhite. Dr. King gave the ““I Have A Dream SpeechI Have A Dream Speech”” to thunderous applause near the endto thunderous applause near the endof the program. Thereafter, Bayard Rustin led participants in a verbal ratification of Marchof the program. Thereafter, Bayard Rustin led participants in a verbal ratification of Marchgoals: passage of the Kennedy bill, a $2 minimum wage, desegregation of schools, agoals: passage of the Kennedy bill, a $2 minimum wage, desegregation of schools, afederal jobs program, and a federal ban on discriminatory employment practices. At thefederal jobs program, and a federal ban on discriminatory employment practices. At theeventevent’’s close, Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays came forward and gaves close, Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays came forward and gavethe benediction. The daythe benediction. The day’’s euphoria did not last long: the Birmingham church bombings euphoria did not last long: the Birmingham church bombingoccurred one month after the March and President Kennedy was assassinated twooccurred one month after the March and President Kennedy was assassinated twomonths after that. The Kennedy Civil Rights bill was later signed into law on July 2,months after that. The Kennedy Civil Rights bill was later signed into law on July 2,1964.1964.Celebrating Men
  12. 12. Selma, Alabama:Selma, Alabama:February - March 1965February - March 1965In March 1965, SCLCIn March 1965, SCLC’’s James Bevel organized several marches from Selma,s James Bevel organized several marches from Selma,Alabama to Montgomery, Alabama, to protest the death of Jimmie LeeAlabama to Montgomery, Alabama, to protest the death of Jimmie LeeJackson. Jackson was shot by Alabama state troopers the previous monthJackson. Jackson was shot by Alabama state troopers the previous monthwhile attempting to shield his mother and 82 year-old grandfather from policewhile attempting to shield his mother and 82 year-old grandfather from policeblows following a march to protest voting rights abuses. The SCLCblows following a march to protest voting rights abuses. The SCLC’’s firsts firstattempt to make the 54 mile journey from Selma to Montgomery wasattempt to make the 54 mile journey from Selma to Montgomery wasinterrupted by beatings from Alabama state troopers on the Edmund Pettusinterrupted by beatings from Alabama state troopers on the Edmund PettusBridge. That evening, American prime time television was interrupted toBridge. That evening, American prime time television was interrupted tobroadcast images from the so-calledbroadcast images from the so-called ““Bloody SundayBloody Sunday”” march. Selma markedmarch. Selma markedthe first time that television brought southern brutality into the homes ofthe first time that television brought southern brutality into the homes ofAmerican and world audiences. In August 1965, the Voting Rights Act wasAmerican and world audiences. In August 1965, the Voting Rights Act waspassed by Congress and signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson. Manypassed by Congress and signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson. Manyscholars view Jimmie Lee Jacksonscholars view Jimmie Lee Jackson’’s death as the catalytic event which set thes death as the catalytic event which set thestage for passage of the Voting Rights Act. Over 1,000 mourners attendedstage for passage of the Voting Rights Act. Over 1,000 mourners attendedJimmie Lee JacksonJimmie Lee Jackson’’s funeral.s funeral.Celebrating Men
  13. 13. The Diaspora todayThe Diaspora todaySome Sobering StatisticsSome Sobering StatisticsCelebrating Men
  14. 14. High School Completion RateHigh School Completion RateHigh School Graduate or More by Race & GenderUnited States Census Bureau01020304050607080901001960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010Year EndedPercentageCompletedTotal MaleTotal FemaleWhite MaleWhite FemaleBlack MaleBlack FemaleHispanic MaleHispanic FemaleSince 1960, the highschool completion ratefor all racial groups hasimproved significantlyUnfortunately, the figuresbelie the high drop-out ratethat our children areexperiencing in many urbanand rural communitiesCelebrating Men
  15. 15. 4 Year College Degree4 Year College DegreeAttained 4 Year College Degree or Moreby Race & GenderUnited States Census Bureau0.05.010.015.020.025.030.035.01960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010Year EndedPercentageCompleted(%)Total MaleTotal FemaleWhite MaleWhite FemaleBlack MaleBlack FemaleHispanic MaleHispanic FemaleBlack Men and Womenhave made significantgains in the attainmentof 4 year collegedegrees since 1960However, AfricanAmericans andHispanics lag thepervasive population bya significant margin inattainment of a 4 yeardegreeLikewise, since the late1990’s, Black Men havelagged well behind BlackWomen on the achievementcurveCelebrating Men
  16. 16. Relative Earning PowerRelative Earning PowerWage Gap By Gender & RaceHighBeam Research30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%110%1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010Year EndedRelativePercentage(%)White MenBlack MenHispanic MenWhite WomenBlack WomenHispanic WomenOver the past 40 years,the wage differentialbetween Black Men andWhite Men has improvedby approximately 8%,Over the past 40 years,the wage differentialbetween Black Men andWhite Men has improvedby approximately 8%,The wage differential betweenWhite Men and all people ofcolor and women is stillsubstantialThe wage differential betweenWhite Men and all people ofcolor and women is stillsubstantialIn contrast, the differential for Black, Whiteand Hispanic Women has improved 44%,37%, and 21% respectivelyIn contrast, the differential for Black, Whiteand Hispanic Women has improved 44%,37%, and 21% respectivelyCelebrating Men
  17. 17. Median Household IncomeMedian Household IncomeMedian Household Income by RaceThe US Census - 2012 Statistical Abstract$20,000$25,000$30,000$35,000$40,000$45,000$50,000$55,000$60,0001970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2009YearHouseholdIncome($)AllWhiteBlackHispanicThere are still hugedisparities between racialgroups with regard tomedian household incomeCelebrating Men
  18. 18. UnemploymentUnemployment40 Year Unemployment Trend - Men 20+Bureau of Labor Statistics0%5%10%15%20%25%197219741976197819801982198419861988199019921994199619982000200220042006200820102012Year EndedUnemploymentPercentageBlack Males White Males Total PopulationHistorically,unemployment amongAfrican American menhas been more thandouble that of Whitemen – The trend hasremained constant overthe past 40 yearsCelebrating Men
  19. 19. Incarcerated PopulationIncarcerated PopulationAfrican Americans representAfrican Americans representapproximately 13% of total USapproximately 13% of total USpopulation, but African Americanpopulation, but African Americanmales comprise approximately 40% ofmales comprise approximately 40% ofthe US male prison populationthe US male prison populationAfrican American males areAfrican American males areincarcerated at a rate ofincarcerated at a rate ofapproximately 3,100 per 100K USapproximately 3,100 per 100K USresidents versus 460 White malesresidents versus 460 White malesand 1,260 Hispanic malesand 1,260 Hispanic males-5001,0001,5002,0002,5003,0003,500PrisonersPer/100KU.S.ResidentsTotal White Black HispanicRace or Ethnic OriginSentenced Prisoners per/100K U.S. ResidentsUS Department of Justice200020052010-200,000400,000600,000800,0001,000,0001,200,0001,400,0001,600,000TotalNumberIncarceratedTotal White Black HispanicRace or Ethinic OriginMale Prison PopulationFederal & State Systems - US Department of Justice200020052010Celebrating MenCelebrating Men
  20. 20. Average Life ExpectancyAverage Life ExpectancyLife Expectancy Trends by Gender & RaceUnited States Census Bureau556065707580851959-1961 1969-1971 1979-1981 1989-1991 1999-2001 2008Census YearLifeExpectancyatBirthAll MaleWhite MaleBlack MaleAll FemaleWhite FemaleBlack FemaleUnfortunately, thedisparity betweenBlack Men andWhite Men has onlydeclined 18%The past 50 years havemarked a significantimprovement in LifeExpectancy for all AmericansAnd, the disparitybetween Black Womenand White Women hasbeen reduced by 56%Celebrating Men
  21. 21. Our commitment toOur commitment toengageengageCelebrating Men
  22. 22. Emory’Emory’s Strategic Focus Areass Strategic Focus Areasfor Community Transformationfor Community TransformationGrow Children, Youth& FamiliesGrow Children, Youth& Families Transform At-Risk AdultsTransform At-Risk Adults Empower People& Communities FinanciallyEmpower People& Communities FinanciallyOur goal is to develop and beginexecuting a strategy thataddresses the needs ofchildren, youth and families in away that eventually reduces thehigh school dropout rate whilemaking more learners andfollowers of Jesus Christ. TheStrategy should include a planfor how people of EmoryFellowship might be a positiveinfluence at the BrightwoodEducational Campus and BridgeAcademyOur goal is to develop and beginexecuting a strategy that helpsus transform at risk adults in away that eventually leads tofewer homeless people. Thestrategy should include thelaunch of a worship and a smallgroup focused program thatdeals with habits, hurts andhang ups. Personscoordinating this project shouldhave experience with the targetpopulation, and will need toidentify recovered individuals tohelp lead the program launch.Our objective is to levelthe economic playingfield in the Brightwoodcommunity in a way thateventually leads to lowera lower unemploymentrare in Ward 4. Thestrategy should includethe strengthening of theEmory Beacon of Ligh sothat it can expand itscommunity developmentwork.Celebrating Men
  23. 23. Potential Men’s MinistryPotential Men’s MinistryInitiativesInitiatives• Unpack issues and align our strategyUnpack issues and align our strategy• Start a chapter of the United Methodist MenStart a chapter of the United Methodist Men• Continue Intergenerational MenContinue Intergenerational Men’s Forum’s Forum• Implement tiered intergenerational mentoringImplement tiered intergenerational mentoring• Fund a youth scholarship programFund a youth scholarship program• Plan a MenPlan a Men’s retreat for team building & spiritual development’s retreat for team building & spiritual development• Commit to a MenCommit to a Men’s Service Day (Emory/EBOL)’s Service Day (Emory/EBOL)• Build relationship w/one anotherBuild relationship w/one another• Relational InterviewsRelational Interviews• View the entire community as the churchView the entire community as the church• Sponsor a day at the ball park to include our young menSponsor a day at the ball park to include our young men• Host a MenHost a Men’s Barbeque Cook-off fundraiser’s Barbeque Cook-off fundraiser• Start a MenStart a Men’s Book Club Small Group’s Book Club Small GroupCelebrating Men
  24. 24. Suggested ReadingSuggested ReadingCelebrating Men
  25. 25. Interested inInterested inGetting Involved?Getting Involved?Learn More:Learn More:http://emoryfellowship.org/connect/mens-ministry/http://emoryfellowship.org/connect/mens-ministry/Contact:Contact:Philip Harmon or John ColemanPhilip Harmon or John ColemanCelebrating MenAs iron sharpens iron,So a man sharpens the countenance of his friend.Proverbs 27:17 (NKJV)
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