Wjec gcse exam prep higher paper unit 2

53,589
-1

Published on

Adapted ppt for unit 2 of WJEC English Language

Published in: Education
0 Comments
31 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
53,589
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
805
Comments
0
Likes
31
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • http://www.wjec.co.uk/index.php?subject=51&level=7&list=paper
  • Wjec gcse exam prep higher paper unit 2

    1. 1. WJEC GCSE Higher TierWJEC GCSE Higher TierUnit 2 English ExamUnit 2 English ExamPreparationPreparationThe writing paper
    2. 2. Paper Two of your English exam will assessyour WRITING SKILLSPaper Two of your English exam will assessyour WRITING SKILLSYou will be asked to complete:•Two non fiction writing tasks – both are worth20 marks•You will have an hour to complete this section,and must answer both questions•You should aim to spend around 30 minutes oneach writing task. This should include 5minutes to check your work once you havecompleted each task
    3. 3. The tasksThe tasksThe writing tasks will ask you to produce a non fiction text, for example, a letter or an email.It is likely to be a functional task, such as writing to inform or explain.The exam board say:‘This unit will test transactional and discursive writing through two equally weightedtasks (20 marks each). Across the two tasks candidates will be offered opportunitiesto write for a range of audiences and purposes, adapting style to form and real-lifecontext in, for example, letters, articles, leaflets, reviews etc.’Both tasks require you to produce a non fiction text in which you have the chance todevelop your ideas in detail, for example, an article for a magazine or newspaper. Thismight involve writing to argue or persuade.You will be given a clear form, purpose and audience for each task. Usually the audience ofthe text will be mentioned in the task, for example, ‘write an email to a friend to let themknow about…’. If an audience is not given, you will be writing for an examiner.There may be a link between the tasks you are asked to complete on Paper Two and textsyou read on Paper One.The following slide will show you an exampleThe writing tasks will ask you to produce a non fiction text, for example, a letter or an email.It is likely to be a functional task, such as writing to inform or explain.The exam board say:‘This unit will test transactional and discursive writing through two equally weightedtasks (20 marks each). Across the two tasks candidates will be offered opportunitiesto write for a range of audiences and purposes, adapting style to form and real-lifecontext in, for example, letters, articles, leaflets, reviews etc.’Both tasks require you to produce a non fiction text in which you have the chance todevelop your ideas in detail, for example, an article for a magazine or newspaper. Thismight involve writing to argue or persuade.You will be given a clear form, purpose and audience for each task. Usually the audience ofthe text will be mentioned in the task, for example, ‘write an email to a friend to let themknow about…’. If an audience is not given, you will be writing for an examiner.There may be a link between the tasks you are asked to complete on Paper Two and textsyou read on Paper One.The following slide will show you an example
    4. 4. Answer Question 1 and Question 2.In this unit you will be assessed for your writing skills, including the presentation of yourwork. Take special care with handwriting, spelling and punctuation.Think about the purpose, audience and, where appropriate, the format for your writing.A guide to the amount you should write is given at the end of each question.1. A company that runs play-schemes for children in the 3-10 age range is looking to recruitpart-time staff for the school summer holidays.You decide to apply.Write your letter of application.The quality of your writing is more important than its length. You should write aboutone to two pages in your answer book.2. You have to give a talk to your class with the title ‘Mobile Phones: a blessing or a curse?’Write what you would say.The quality of your writing is more important than its length. You should write aboutone to two pages in your answer book.
    5. 5. REMINDERWhen an examiner marks your work, they will look at thefollowing Assessment Objectives for writing:1.That you can communicate clearly, effectively andimaginatively, using and adapting forms and selectingvocabulary appropriate to task and purpose in ways whichengage the reader.2.Organise information and ideas into structured andsequenced sentences, paragraphs and whole texts, using avariety of linguistic and structural features to supportcohesion and overall coherence.3.Use a range of sentence structures for clarity, purpose andeffect, with accurate punctuation and spelling.
    6. 6. Guide toplanning yourwriting
    7. 7. YOU MUST PLAN YOUR WRITINGYOU MUST PLAN YOUR WRITINGTiming:•Ideally, you want to spend around 30minutes on each task, including around 5minutes to plan and check your work.•The examiner will expect your writing to bearound 4 – 5 paragraphs which isapproximately one and a half to two sides ifyou have average sized handwriting.
    8. 8. Stage 1: P.A.L.LStage 1: P.A.L.LThe first thing that you should do in an exam is read the question carefully. Whenyou are sure that you understand what you are being asked to do, look for thePALL.PURPOSE – What is the purpose of the task?What is it asking you to do?AUDIENCE Who is it for?LANGUAGE What language will be used?LAYOUT How is it set out on the page? What features should you include?
    9. 9. TRY:Find the PAF in the following examination questions.Write a letter to your school magazine which argues for oragainst homework being set at Key Stage 4.Write a review for a teen website about a film or TVprogramme you have seen recently.Write a report for your local newspaper which offersadvice on how to provide more facilities for teenagers.Write an article for a teen magazine persuading youngpeople to stop smoking.TRY:Find the PAF in the following examination questions.Write a letter to your school magazine which argues for oragainst homework being set at Key Stage 4.Write a review for a teen website about a film or TVprogramme you have seen recently.Write a report for your local newspaper which offersadvice on how to provide more facilities for teenagers.Write an article for a teen magazine persuading youngpeople to stop smoking.
    10. 10. Stage 2: Spider diagramStage 2: Spider diagramAfter writing your PALL, the next stage is to put down all of your thoughts ona given topic. Think about the shorter question from Jan 2011:Write a letter to your head teacher explaining how to improve yourschool or college.Remember to:Write a letterExplain the things that would make your school or college better.Your P = to explain the things that would make your school or college betterYour A = your head teacherYour L= formal and persuasiveYour L = a letter
    11. 11. Your next step should be to design a spider diagram to get down as manythoughts as possible about the question.ImproveschoolNewcomputersNew uniformNew school rulesBetter foodNew playing fieldsNew sports equipmentMore teachersLonger school dayNew buildingsMore text books
    12. 12. Stage 3: Developing your ideasStage 3: Developing your ideasThe next step is to develop your ideas by adding more detail to your plan and to note downwhat you will include in each paragraph.Look at how this plan, based upon the previous spider diagram, would help you write youressay.Intro – Formal – Dear Mr or Ms …… state briefly why you are writing to them, that you feelschool needs to change. State that you have a number of suggestions.Para 1 – If school needs to change something fundamental like uniform and school rulesexplain how to change and the impact on school.Para 2 – Explain improvements to sporting facilities and equipment. Why important.Para 3 – Explain improvements you would like to see to canteen food. Why important.Para 4 – Explain improvements to lessons. More text books, better computers, more teachers,more interesting lessons? Explain what you’d like to see and why.Conclusion – Summarise your main points and thank your head teacher for reading. Can youthink of a final sentence to push him or her into understanding why your changes are soimportant?
    13. 13. Basic skillsto improveyour writing
    14. 14. Structuring your writingStructuring your writingAfter you have written your plan, you need to think about how to structureyour writing. Here are some handy hints:•Start each new paragraph with a topic sentence. Topic sentences introduceyour paragraph. They let the reader know what to expect.•Link your paragraphs using connectives – words or phrases that show yourreader how your ideas link and work together. Here are some different kinds ofconnectives:• Time order: At first, Then, Later• Logical order: Therefore, Consequently, As a result• Contrast: On the other hand, In contrast• Simple ordering of ideas: Firstly, Secondly, Finally• Development of ideas: Because of this, Also, Moreover, What is more,In addition
    15. 15. Structuring your writing (continued)Structuring your writing (continued)Think carefully about how to paragraph your work:•Start by introducing what your writing is going tobe about•Develop your ideas in the next two, three or fourparagraphs•Keep to one main idea for each paragraph•Make sure you restate your point of view clearlyat the end of your writing. You could also save anew idea for your conclusion.
    16. 16. Look at this question:Many older people don’t use computers or the internet, eitherbecause they don’t see any value in them or because they areafraid of modern technology.You have been asked to give a talk to a group of older people topersuade them to use computers and the internet.Write what you would say. [20]The quality of your writing is more important than its length. You should write aboutone to two pages in your answer book.
    17. 17. Some other waysto improve yourwriting
    18. 18. SentencesSentencesTop Tip:Try using a range of sentences in yourwork.Why?It will make your writing moreinteresting and hopefully impress theexaminer.
    19. 19. Sentences continuedSentences continuedSo what kinds of sentences are there?The grammar bitThere are three kinds of sentences and you should try touse a mixture of all threeSimple sentencesCompound sentencesComplex sentences
    20. 20. Short sentencesA simple sentence contains one main idea, with one subject and a verb. It is asentence which is complete in itself.The boy sauntered into the roomBoy = subjectSauntered = verbAs you can see, the sentence is only about one thing which is a boy saunteringinto a room!Sentences continuedSentences continued
    21. 21. Sentences continuedSentences continuedShort sentences have a variety of uses.They can:•Add excitement to your writingThe girl started running. She turned. The man was still following.•Make a powerful pointPeople often promise to stop misbehaving in lessons. This never seems tohappen – someone always lets the class down. Something needs tochange.•A single word sentence looks fab!The fog stretched ahead of her, enclosing and wrapping itself around thehouse, the car, the world. Silence.
    22. 22. Sentences continuedSentences continuedCompound sentencesCompound sentences are easy, they are two simple sentences joined together.This type of sentence must be balanced though, each part of the sentence must beable to ‘stand on its own’.Two simple sentences:My friend invited me to a tea party. My parents didn’t let me go.A compound sentence:My friend invited me to a tea party, but my parents didnt let me go.Do you want to stay here, or would you like to go shopping with me?I have a lot of work to finish, so I will be up all night.EASY!
    23. 23. Sentences continuedSentences continuedComplex sentencesA complex sentence is made up of at least one main clause and at least onesubordinate or supporting clause.ClausesIt sounds tricky but is in fact very easy. If you look at most longish sentences, you willnotice that the sentences are made up of different parts. The main clause is the part ofthe sentence that makes sense on its own. The subordinate clause links to the mainclause but can’t stand on its own.The horse galloped across the field as if something was chasing him.main clausesubordinate clause
    24. 24. Sentences continuedSentences continuedComplex sentences are great because we can ‘expand’ them.We can use extra detail to make the writing come alive and to enable them topicture what you are writing about.The horse, who was glad to be free, galloped across the field as if somethingwas chasing him.We can also use adjectives and nouns to add more detail:The delighted horse galloped joyously across the field as if something waschasing him.Remember:Showing range and variety in your writing gets you marks.This applies as much to your sentences as to vocabulary,punctuation and ideas.
    25. 25. TRYLook at a leaflet or magazinearticle. Choose one paragraph andcount how many sentences it has.Then identify the complex,compound and simple sentences.How much variety is there?
    26. 26. PUNCTUATIONPUNCTUATIONIf you want to get a top grade inyour exam you’ve got to knowabout punctuation.It’s easy when you know how.If you want to get a top grade inyour exam you’ve got to knowabout punctuation.It’s easy when you know how.
    27. 27. ApostrophesUse apostrophes to:Show possession.First find the ownerThe pen belonging to the teacherThe bag belonging to the ladyThen, add ‘sThe teacher’s penThe lady’s bagBut, if the owner already ends in s then just add the apostropheThe bikes belonging to the boysThe boys’ bikesThe coat belonging to Mrs SykesMrs Sykes’ coatUse apostrophes to:Show possession.First find the ownerThe pen belonging to the teacherThe bag belonging to the ladyThen, add ‘sThe teacher’s penThe lady’s bagBut, if the owner already ends in s then just add the apostropheThe bikes belonging to the boysThe boys’ bikesThe coat belonging to Mrs SykesMrs Sykes’ coat
    28. 28. Apostrophes RemindersApostrophes also show where letters have been removed.Do not talk = don’t talkShe will not talk = she won’t talkShe has not got any = she hasn’tApostrophes also show where letters have been removed.Do not talk = don’t talkShe will not talk = she won’t talkShe has not got any = she hasn’t
    29. 29. Try!Add the apostrophes in the sentences below:1.The cats whiskers.2.The teachers pen.3.There are birds nests in the beech trees.4.Paul caught the dogs tail.5.The boys toilets.6.Mrs Robinsons coat.7.The miners lamps.8.Its a big decision.9.The womens handbags.10. The builders toolkit.
    30. 30. How to uselanguage toget highermarks
    31. 31. This section is all about how to uselanguage creatively. An examiner willsee hundreds of examination papers.How can you get yours to stand out?Try to remember and use some of thefollowing tips in your writing. They willhelp you gain a higher mark. You knowit makes sense!This section is all about how to uselanguage creatively. An examiner willsee hundreds of examination papers.How can you get yours to stand out?Try to remember and use some of thefollowing tips in your writing. They willhelp you gain a higher mark. You knowit makes sense!
    32. 32. Everything youwanted to knowabout openingsand endingsEverything youwanted to knowabout openingsand endings
    33. 33. Openings and endingsOpenings and endingsOne of the most difficult things inEnglish is deciding how to start apiece of writing and then how tofinish it.Follow these simple tips to maximiseyour grade.
    34. 34. The job of an opening is to grab the reader’s attention. You must hook the reader straight awayand force them to continue reading.Here are some ways to do this:For non fictionStart with a quotation (real or made up)63% of 16 year olds don’t take enough exerciseAn anecdoteIt was watching X Factor with my friends that really got me into danceA rhetorical questionSchools to close? Teachers to resign? This is not some vision of the future – it is happeningnow….How to write an effective openingHow to write an effective opening
    35. 35. The conclusion is the ending to your writing – it is theimpression that you will leave the reader with. For a nonfiction essay you need to summarise (not just repeat) yourmain points and provide a final perspective on the topic. Tryand use anecdotes, or humour or statistics to conclude.If you take anything from this speech, I want you toremember that school uniform is unnecessary, it is uglyand most parents can ill afford it. Why does this schoolpersist in making us students suffer in this way? 97% ofstudents and 87% of parents think that students in Year10 and 11 should be given the choice to decide what theywear. Do the right thing. You know it makes sense.How to write an effective endingHow to write an effective ending
    36. 36. Different types of writingDifferent types of writingOne of the most common questionsasked by students is how to set out aletter, an article etc..This section is all about the differenttypes of writing you might be asked toproduce in your writing exam.
    37. 37. Part of your overall grade for writing will depend on your ability to spella wide range of words accurately. Handwriting is not assessed, however,if an examiner cannot read your writing you are unlikely to score highly.Follow these simple tips to boost your spelling:•create a list of common spelling errors. Try using this linkhttp://www.gcse.com/english/spellings.htm•learn to spell the most common words using the look, cover, write,check method•learn the difference between commonly confused words such as:• there/their/they’re• two/to/too• quite/quiet• effect/affect• where/were/we’re• accept/exceptSimple spelling rulesSimple spelling rules
    38. 38. What is a simile?A simile is a comparison of two things using like or asThe frost sparkled like diamonds on the pavementWhat is a metaphor?A metaphor is a comparison of two things where one thing is anotherThe boxer’s iron fist crashed into the opponentWhat is emotive language?Emotive language is any language that makes people feel emotionali.e. anger, sympathy etc..There are many valid reasons why cosmetics should not be tested onanimals. This hurtful industry causes unimaginable agony to theseinnocent animals. Would you condone experiments conducted onyour own child?Don’t forget that you can use statistics, even if you have madethem up yourself!Everything you ever wanted to know about metaphors, similes andemotive language – try using these devices even in non fictionEverything you ever wanted to know about metaphors, similes andemotive language – try using these devices even in non fiction
    39. 39. For your Englishexamination, you willbe asked to write in avariety of styles e.g. aletter, magazine articleetc.. and to write for avariety of differentpurposes e.g. to argue,to persuade etc..Different types of writingDifferent types of writing
    40. 40. To write a letter, you need to go back toyour PALL. Who is your audience? Yourletter will be very different if you arewriting to your head teacher than if you arewriting to your best friend. You must thinkcarefully about your language and yourtone.Letter writingLetter writing
    41. 41. Here are some general tips for letter writing.For formal letters:•Write your address in the top right hand corner•Write the business address in the top left hand corner•Start either with a name (if you are given it in the question) or with Dear Sir /Madam•Begin by stating why you are writing the letter•Write your points clearly and in paragraphs•Finish your letter with Yours faithfully if you began with Dear Sir / Madam•Finish your letter with Yours sincerely if you began with a nameFor informal letters:•Write your address in the top right hand corner. This shows the examiner youknow how to set out a letter•Start with Dear (name of friend)•Write your points clearly and in paragraphs•Finish your letter informally e.g. lots of love or speak soonLetter writingLetter writing
    42. 42. Writing an article for a newspaper or magazine is a verycommon question at GCSE.Follow these top tips for exam success!!1.Do write a headline, it shows you are aware ofpresentational features. Also use a strapline which fitsunderneath the headline. Use subheadings when youchange topics.2.Don’t waste your time drawing pictures – an empty boxwill suffice and you don’t need to bother writing incolumns.3.Think carefully about the purpose of your article, makesure you sustain the purpose until the end of your article.4.Express your ideas clearly, usually one idea perparagraph.Writing articles for newspapers and magazinesWriting articles for newspapers and magazines
    43. 43. Writing a report is another common GCSE question. Moretop tips………•Reports are nearly always factual and ask you to dothings such as write a report for the school magazineabout a recent school play or a school trip•Reports are usually a mix of fact and opinion (butremember, your facts don’t have to be true)•Use a headline like a newspaper article•Use reported speech•Try using what, when, who and where in your openingparagraph to set the scene for the reader•Write organised paragraphs which explain whathappenedWriting a reportWriting a report
    44. 44. You may be asked to write a review. A review is basically your account of anevent and your thoughts and feelings on it.A review usually follows the same structure:1.A brief description / summary of the concert, play, film, TV programmethat you are reviewing.2.A bit more detail with examples to highlight what was good or bad aboutit.3.Your opinion.Top tips for writing a review•If you are asked to write a review about a film, don’t give away the ending•Consider ending with an evaluation and marks out of 10•If possible, write about any technical details e.g. in a film / play reviewyou could write about the special effects / settings / the director / theacting•Your review topic (film / book / holiday / concert etc.) can be real orimaginaryWriting a reviewWriting a review
    45. 45. In addition to writing in a particularstyle i.e. a letter or a newspaperreport, you will be asked to write for aparticular purpose i.e. to argue yourpoint of view, to persuade your readerof something, or to explain a particulartopic.
    46. 46. Top tips:•Find your PALL and write a plan – examiners want to see structured,considered work•An argument means you put forward a well considered point of view– for or against a given topicConsider using all or some of the following:•anecdotes real or imaginary•statistics real or imaginary•arguments to counter the main alternative views•rhetorical questions•emotive language•rule of three•repetition•hyperboleWriting an argumentWriting an argument
    47. 47. Top tips:•Find your PALL and write a plan – examiners want to see structured,considered work•Being persuasive means to encourage your readers to believe or dosomething•Writing to persuade is generally more emotional and one sided thanwriting to argueConsider using all or some of the following:•emotive language – make your writing particularly emotional•anecdotes – real or imaginary•Pronouns - ‘we’ or ‘you’ to give a sense of belonging•List or rule of three•statistics - real or imaginary•rhetorical questions•examples of what could be done to improve the situationWriting to persuadeWriting to persuade
    48. 48. Top tips:•Find your PALL and write a plan – examiners want to see structured,considered work•Writing to advise means to give your audience help to do something,so depending on your PALL , your work needs to be very clearly laidoutConsider using all or some of the following:•bullet points or headings to separate ideas into sections•diagrams (not too elaborate though!)•offer logical solutions•commands (then you should…..)•be encouraging and motivating in your tone•try and capture the reader’s attention (what kind of learner areyou??)•depending on PAF, be polite but informalWriting to adviseWriting to advise
    49. 49. Top tips:•Find your PALL and write a plan – examiners want to see structured,considered work•Explaining something means being objective and explaining how andwhy something happens. You may be asked to write something formallyor explain about something that is personal to youConsider using all or some of the following:•try describing a situation and explaining how and why it came about andwhat effect it had•always give reasons and examples for why something occurs•use statistics or ‘evidence’ either real or made up but make it soundbelievable•be clear and specific•focus on the title, if you are asked to write about something memorable– then write about that•consider your language, it should be interesting to readWriting to explainWriting to explain
    50. 50. Writing to informWriting to informTop tips:•Find your PALL and write a plan – examiners want to see structured,considered work•Informative writing means you are giving clear information to your reader inan easy to understand styleConsider using all or some of the following:•include both facts and opinions – either real or imaginary•use statistics or evidence – either real or imaginary. You should sound as ifyou know about the subject•personal anecdotes to make it more interesting•consider language use carefully – who are you writing for and how will thisinfluence your language use•make your information very clear – imagine your reader knows nothing aboutthe topic
    51. 51. Specimen Exam andMark scheme
    52. 52. Test yourself!Specimen mark scheme andanalysisThe next slide will give you the opportunity to try out some ofthe skills you have learned in this unit of work. Remember,you must answer both questions and have 1 hour tocomplete all of the writing.A mark scheme is included so you can assess your work.Good Luck!!
    53. 53. Answer Question 1 and Question 2.In this unit you will be assessed for your writing skills, including the presentation of yourwork. Take special care with handwriting, spelling and punctuation.Think about the purpose, audience and, where appropriate, the format for your writing.A guide to the amount you should write is given at the end of each question.1. A company that runs play-schemes for children in the 3-10 age range is looking to recruitpart-time staff for the school summer holidays.You decide to apply.Write your letter of application.The quality of your writing is more important than its length. You should write aboutone to two pages in your answer book.2. You have to give a talk to your class with the title ‘Mobile Phones: a blessing or a curse?’Write what you would say.The quality of your writing is more important than its length. You should write aboutone to two pages in your answer book.
    54. 54. For each of questions 1 and 2 you will be awarded two marks:Content and organisation (13 marks)Here the examiner is looking for evidence of:•Purpose, audience and form•Organisation – cohesion and use of clear, ordered paragraphs•Use of a style appropriate to audience and purpose•A range of vocabularySentence structure, punctuation, spelling (7 marks)Here the examiner is looking for evidence of:•Sentence use•Punctuation•Spelling•Tense and agreementThe following slides will give you the mark scheme an examiner would use when marking yourwriting. Check each band carefully and see which band your work would ‘best fit’.Mark Scheme
    55. 55. Letter of application for a job. [20]An understanding of purpose, audience and format is particularly important in thistype of writing. As the task is of a functional nature, an understanding of real life‘uses of English is also important.Content and organisation (13 marks)0 marks: not worthy of creditBand 1 1-3 marks• basic awareness of the purpose and format of the task• some awareness of the reader / intended audience• some relevant comment but analysis is basic• simple sequencing of ideas provides some coherence• paragraphs may be used to show obvious divisions or group ideas into someorder• some attempt to adapt style to purpose / audience (e.g. degree of formality)• there is a limited range of vocabulary with little variation of word choice formeaning or effect
    56. 56. Letter of application for a job. [20]An understanding of purpose, audience and format is particularly important in thistype of writing. As the task is of a functional nature, an understanding of real life‘uses of English is also important.Content and organisation (13 marks)Band 2 4-6 marks• shows awareness of the purpose and format of the task• shows awareness of the reader / intended audience• a sense of purpose shown in analysis / comment and some reasons are given insupport of opinions and ideas• sequencing of ideas provides coherence• paragraphs are logically ordered and sequenced (e.g. topic sentences aresupported by relevant detail)• a clear attempt to adapt style to purpose / audience• there is some range of vocabulary, occasionally selected to convey precisemeaning or to create effect
    57. 57. Letter of application for a job. [20]An understanding of purpose, audience and format is particularly important in thistype of writing. As the task is of a functional nature, an understanding of real life‘uses of English is also important.Content and organisation (13 marks)Band 3 7-9 marks• shows clear understanding of the purpose and format of the task• shows clear awareness of the reader / intended audience• clear sense of purpose shown in content coverage; appropriate reasons givenin support of opinions/ ideas• ideas are shaped into coherent arguments• paragraphs or sections are used consciously to structure the writing• style is adapted to purpose / audience• there is a range of vocabulary selected to convey precise meaning or to createeffect
    58. 58. Letter of application for a job. [20]An understanding of purpose, audience and format is particularly important in thistype of writing. As the task is of a functional nature, an understanding of real life‘uses of English is also important.Content and organisation (13 marks)Band 4 10-13 marks• shows sophisticated understanding of the purpose and format of the task• shows sustained awareness of the reader / intended audience• content coverage is well-judged, detailed, and pertinent• arguments are convincingly developed and supported by relevant detail• ideas are selected and prioritised to construct sophisticated argument• paragraphs are effectively varied in length and structure to control progression• confident and sophisticated use of a range of stylistic devices adapted topurpose/audience• a wide range of appropriate, ambitious vocabulary is used to create effect orconvey precise meaning
    59. 59. Sentence structure, punctuation and spelling (7 marks)0 marks: not worthy of creditBand 1 1 mark• sentences are mostly simple or compound• compound sentences are linked or sequenced by conjunctions such as ‘and’ or ‘so’• punctuation (full stops, commas, capital letters to demarcate sentences) isattempted where appropriate and with some accuracy• the spelling of simple words is usually accurate• control of tense and agreement is unevenBand 2 2-3 marks• sentences are varied and both compound and complex sentences are used• there is use of some subordination to achieve clarity and economy• some control of a range of punctuation, including the punctuation of direct speech• the spelling of simple and polysyllabic words is usually accurate• control of tense and agreement is generally secure
    60. 60. Band 3 4-5 marks• a range of grammatical structures is used to vary the length and focus ofsentences• simple, compound and complex sentences are used to achieve particular effects• a range of punctuation is used accurately to structure sentences and texts,sometimes to create deliberate effects, including parenthetic commas• most spelling, including that of irregular words, is usually correct• control of tense and agreement is secureBand 4 6-7 marks•there is appropriate and effective variation of sentence structures•there is a sophisticated use of simple, compound and complex sentences toachieve particular effects•accurate punctuation is used to vary pace, clarify meaning, avoid ambiguity andcreate deliberate effects•virtually all spelling, including that of complex irregular words, is correct•tense changes are used confidently and purposefullyIt is presumed that candidates attaining Band 2 and above will have achievedthe criteria listed in the previous band(s). Fine tuning of the mark within aband will be made on the basis of a "best fit" procedure, weaknesses in someareas being compensated by strengths in others.
    61. 61. Additional task-specific guidanceGood answers may include some of the following features:• a sustained sense of register and purpose which meets the requirement for aletter of application (for example, a suitably formal tone and offering convincingreasons why the writer is a suitable applicant)• a clear and coherent approach (offering a range of skills and aptitudes suitablefor the requirements of the job)• a logical structure within which relevant information is conveyed effectively andclearly• an evident sense of cohesion with material linked effectively (use ofconnectives/subordination)• a range of appropriate and well-selected details to illustrate and give substanceto information offered (relevant details of previous part time work or offeringnames of people prepared to offer a reference)• some development of ideas (perhaps showing evidence of specific skills, such asworking with young children)• positioning and establishing a relationship with the reader (clear sense ofaudience)• ability to move from the general to the particular or vice-versa (specific andrelevant examples used within a coherent approach to the topic)• clear understanding of format
    62. 62. Less successful answers may be characterised by some of the followingfeatures:• uncertain sense of purpose and register (for example, ignoring the specificrequirements for the job or showing a limited sense of audience)• less secure control of structure (uncertain or random sequencing)• a tendency for details to be handled in isolation with limited sense of linking orcohesion (uneasy with connectives/subordination)• details are thin or generalised with little sense of development (for example, Iwould enjoy working with children but giving no evidence why this would be thecase)• limited development of why the writer would be a strong candidate and atendency to simple assertion (for example, I like adventure activities so I would begood in this job)• very limited awareness of the reader (for example, offering details unrelated tothe demands of the post applied for)• a tendency for comments about personal strengths and qualities to stay at thelevel of the general and to lack specific examples• limited understanding of the features of a letter of application
    63. 63. Talk to class : ‘Mobile Phones: a blessing or a curse?’ [20]An understanding of purpose, audience and format is particularly important in thistype of writing. As the task is of a functional nature, an understanding of real life‘uses of English is also important.Content and organisation (13 marks)0 marks: not worthy of creditBand 1 1-3 marks• basic awareness of the purpose and format of the task• some awareness of the reader / intended audience• some relevant comment but analysis is basic• simple sequencing of ideas provides some coherence• paragraphs may be used to show obvious divisions or group ideas into someorder• some attempt to adapt style to purpose / audience (e.g. degree of formality)• there is a limited range of vocabulary with little variation of word choice formeaning or effect
    64. 64. Content and organisation (13 marks)Band 2 4-6 marks• shows awareness of the purpose and format of the task• shows awareness of the reader / intended audience• a sense of purpose shown in content coverage and somereasons are given insupport of opinions and ideas• sequencing of ideas provides coherence• paragraphs are logically ordered and sequenced (e.g. topicsentences aresupported by relevant detail)• a clear attempt to adapt style to purpose / audience• there is some range of vocabulary, occasionally selected toconvey precisemeaning or to create effect
    65. 65. Band 3 7-9 marks• shows clear understanding of the purpose and format of thetask• shows clear awareness of the reader / intended audience• clear sense of purpose shown in content coverage;appropriate reasons givenin support of opinions / ideas• ideas are shaped into coherent arguments• paragraphs are used consciously to structure the writing• style is adapted to purpose / audience• there is a range of vocabulary selected to convey precisemeaning or to createeffect
    66. 66. Band 4 10-13 marks• shows sophisticated understanding of the purpose and format ofthe task• shows sustained awareness of the reader / intended audience• content coverage is well-judged, detailed, and pertinent• arguments are convincingly developed and supported by relevantdetail• ideas are selected and prioritised to construct sophisticatedargument• paragraphs are effectively varied in length and structure tocontrol progression• confident and sophisticated use of a range of stylistic devicesadapted to purpose/audience• a wide range of appropriate, ambitious vocabulary is used tocreate effect or convey precise meaning
    67. 67. Sentence structure, punctuation and spelling (7 marks)0 marks: not worthy of creditBand 1 1 mark• sentences are mostly simple or compound• compound sentences are linked or sequenced by conjunctions such as ‘and’ or ‘so’• punctuation (full stops, commas, capital letters to demarcate sentences) isattempted where appropriate and with some accuracy• the spelling of simple words is usually accurate• control of tense and agreement is unevenBand 2 2-3 marks• sentences are varied and both compound and complex sentences are used• there is use of some subordination to achieve clarity and economy• some control of a range of punctuation, including the punctuation of direct speech• the spelling of simple and polysyllabic words is usually accurate• control of tense and agreement is generally secure
    68. 68. Band 3 4-5 marks• a range of grammatical structures is used to vary the length and focus ofsentences• simple, compound and complex sentences are used to achieve particular effects• a range of punctuation is used accurately to structure sentences and texts,sometimes to create deliberate effects, including parenthetic commas• most spelling, including that of irregular words, is usually correct• control of tense and agreement is secureBand 4 6-7 marks•there is appropriate and effective variation of sentence structures•there is a sophisticated use of simple, compound and complex sentences toachieve particular effects•accurate punctuation is used to vary pace, clarify meaning, avoid ambiguity andcreate deliberate effects•virtually all spelling, including that of complex irregular words, is correct•tense changes are used confidently and purposefullyIt is presumed that candidates attaining Band 2 and above will have achievedthe criteria listed in the previous band(s). Fine tuning of the mark within aband will be made on the basis of a "best fit" procedure, weaknesses in someareas being compensated by strengths in others.
    69. 69. Additional task-specific guidanceGood answers may include some of the following features:• a sustained sense of register and purpose which meets the requirement for a talk (forexample, a lively, opinionated or witty approach)• a clear and coherent approach• a logical structure within which relevant information is conveyed effectively andclearly• an evident sense of cohesion with material linked effectively (use ofconnectives/subordination)• a range of appropriate and well-selected details to illustrate and give substance tosuggestions, information and opinions (relevant use of facts/figures/anecdotes)• some development of ideas and opinions (perhaps involving alternative views)• positioning and establishing a relationship with the reader via devices such asasides, questions, humour, use of active or passive voice and other journalisticdevices (clear sense of audience)• ability to move from the general to the particular or vice-versa (specificexamples used within a coherent approach to the topic)
    70. 70. Less successful answers may be characterised by some of the followingfeatures:• uncertain sense of purpose and register (for example, ignoring the requirement fora talk)• less secure control of structure (uncertain or random sequencing/no clear sense ofargument)• a tendency for details to be handled in isolation with limited sense of linking orcohesion (uneasy with connectives/subordination)• details are thin or generalised with little sense of development (for example, asingle sentence for each topic such as everyone like mobile phones)• limited development of ideas/opinions and a tendency to simple assertion (forexample, not having a mobile phone is ridiculous)• very limited awareness of the audience• a tendency for comments to stay at the level of the general and to lack specificexamples
    71. 71. Finally!!Top tips for exam success:1.Read widely and for pleasure.2.Read non-fiction and fiction. Make friends with your school librarian.3.Listen carefully in class. Your teacher is an expert and wants you togain the highest grade possible.4.Try completing as many practice papers as possible at home. Thisgives you a feel for the timings and the sort of questions you will beasked.5.Try planning imaginary essay questions using the three point method.6.Try and extend your vocabulary. Reading will help with this.7.Make a list of your weaknesses – is it spelling, apostrophes, planningetc. and work on them.8.Get a good night’s sleep before the exam.9.Ensure you have at least two black / blue pens.10.Take a deep breath, close your eyes and relax. You can do it!!
    72. 72. LinksLinksLinks to WJEC exam papersLinks to WJEC exam papershttp://www.wjec.co.uk/index.php?subject=51
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×