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Pastry

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  • 1. Patisserie Project:Black Forest Gateau By Emma Druitt
  • 2. Introduction I will be producing an in depth study and analysis of my chosen dessert, Black Forest Gateau. I will be researching the history of my chosen dish and the influences involved that has made it the way it is today. I will then modify the black forest gateau and present it in a modern way while showing the use of different techniques. When I have my modified dish I will then present it with a description to the class.
  • 3. History The definitive origin of the cake is unknown. But in 1915 confectioner Josef Keller claimed to have invented the Black Forest Cherry Cake and is saying that he was the first person to have done so. He said he sold the cake in his café “Agner” in Bad Godesberg. This claim has not been confirmed. 1”In1915 when the recipe was thought to be invented”, Josef Keller was making a cake with just cherries and cream because the school students that always visited his sweets shop always demanded sweet treats. One day he went and added Kirshwasser to the cherries thus creating the Schwarzwalder Kirschtorte. 1“He Claus Schaeffe died in the spring of 1981 but his original cake recipe lives on by his son, Karl Keller (65 years old).” With the the delicacy still in high demand it is still sold to this present day by Claus Schaeffe in Triberg Germany at Café Schaeffe. His father was Josef Keller‟s apprentice.
  • 4. History 2“Schwarzwalder Kirschtorte was first mentioned in writing in 1934.” In the mid 1960‟s newspapers reveal references to a Black Forest cake which was served in trendy urban restaurants. In 1964 in the New York Times, Klaus Limberg, a pastry chef was selling the cake at his café “Tavern on the Green”. From 1963 to 1975 we can see the recipe change from a basic cherry, cream and kirsch cake to a more elaborate recipe with added lemons, two different types of cherries (sour and sweet) and imported chocolate. The non-traditional versions now omit the kirsch so that the cake is lighter as the alcohol tended to make the cake heavy.
  • 5. History The name is not directly named after the Black Forest, 1“which is a mountain range South West of Germany”, but of the kirsch liquor or Schwarzwalder. The liquor is distilled from tart cherries and gives the cake its flavour and alcoholic texture. Cherries, Cream and Kirsch were formally made in the form of a dessert rather than a cake. It is said to have originated in Germany the cherries were cooked and served with cream and kirsch with a cake which combined cherries, biscuit and cream.
  • 6. The Black Forest The Black Forest, 1“the place where Historians believe the cake originated from in the 16th century”. The Forest is said to evoke darkness and mystery and was called the Black Forest because the trees were so thick that they blocked out the light. 3“It is also where The Brothers Grimm created their fairytales „Hansel and Grettel‟ and „Little Red Riding Hood‟”, this forest is where these stories are set. The Forest is well known for growing its familiar sour cherries which is the main component in the cake that gives it its originality.
  • 7. Timeline 1915: Josef Keller said to 1934: have invented the Black Forest Cake first“Black Forest Cherry mentioned in writing Cake” 2012: 1962-1975: The original cakes The recipe changed toare still being sold in a more sophisticatedTriberg Germany by cake with added Claus Schaeffe ingredients.
  • 8. Original RecipeIngredients225g/8oz butter, softened, plus extra for greasing225g/8oz caster sugar160g/5½oz self-raising flour65g/2¼oz cocoa powder½ tsp baking powder4 medium eggsFilling and decoration340g/11¾oz jar of morello cherry jam2 x 80g/2¾oz packs of sweetened dried sour cherries2–3 tbsp Kirsch100ml/3½fl oz cherry brandy (ideally morello cherry brandy)500ml/18fl oz double cream50g/2oz dark chocolate, coarsely gratedfresh cherries, to decorateO Preparation methodO Preheat the oven to 190°C/375F/Gas 5. Grease 2 x 20cm/8 in loose-based sandwich tins and line the bases with baking parchment.O Put the butter, sugar, flour, cocoa powder, baking powder and eggs into a food processor and blend until smooth and thick. You may need push the mixture down from the sides a couple of times to make sure the mixture is well blended.O Divide the batter between the prepared cake tins and spread it out evenly with a rubber spatula.O Bake for 22–25 minutes or until the cakes are nicely risen and just beginning to shrink away from the sides of the tins. Remove them from the oven and cool for 5 minutes before turning out on to a wire rack. Take off the lining paper and leave the cakes to cool.O When the cakes are cold, cut them in half, horizontally, with a long-bladed serrated knife. Take care to keep the knife parallel to the work surface, to get a good even cut. Place the cakes back on the wire rack or a board, cut sides up.O For the filling, put the jam in a saucepan with the sour cherries and Kirsch and place over a low heat. Bring to a gentle simmer and cook for 6–8 minutes, stirring, until the jam has melted and the cherries are beginning to swell. Leave to cool for 15 minutes.O Sprinkle the cherry brandy over the chocolate sponges, then spread three of them with the sour cherry mixture and leave to cool. Make sure that the sponge without the cherry topping is from the top half of a cake.O Whip 300ml/10fl oz of the cream with an electric hand-whisk until soft peaks form.O Transfer one of the sponges (with the cherry topping) very carefully to a cake stand or plate – slide a cake tin base under the sponge to help you. Using a couple of pudding spoons, dollop about a third of the whipped cream gently on top of the cherry mixture. There is no need to spread it out, but try to keep the spoonfuls evenly spaced over the cake. Sprinkle with a little of the grated chocolate.O Top with another sponge and repeat the layers twice more. You should end up with three layers of sponge, cherries, cream and chocolate. Place the final sponge on top, with its top surface facing upwards.O Whip the remaining 200ml/8fl oz of the cream with an electric hand-whisk until soft peaks form.O Using the flat side of a palette knife, spread about three tablespoons of the cream over the top of the cake, taking it all the way to the edge. Spoon the remaining cream into a piping bag fitted with a large, plain nozzle and pipe rosettes around the edge of the cake. Tip almost all the remaining grated chocolate into the centre and sprinkle the rest over the rosettes.Decorate with fresh cherries if you have some. Keep the cake cool or chill until ready to serve.
  • 9. How to make the cake
  • 10. Famous Chefs Heston Blumenthal is one of the famous chefs who has chosen to re- invent the black forest gateau. On his show “In search of perfection” he serves a deconstructed cake that involves chocolate mousse, aerated chocolate, crunchy biscuit, apricot compote, sour cherries, chocolate ganache, chocolate sponge and kirsch cream/mousse.
  • 11. AnalysisThe Black Forest Gateau is something that everyoneknow and loves. It is something that has been around forgenerations and is remembered by its chocolate sponge,cream, kirsch soaked cherries and chocolate shavings.When thinking about my dessert I wanted to capture theaspects of the dish that everyone knows and loves butpresent it in a way that the elements were transformed. By adding to or changing the components of thedish I wanted people to taste a range of exciting flavoursbut for it to not be a sickly sweet dessert.
  • 12. My Techniques Used Chocolate cake covered in a chocolate plank:This is a dark chocolate cake to enhance the chocolate flavour of the dish. It has chocolateon the top and bottom of the cake slice which will add to the texture. This component isused to signify the chocolate cake and shavings used in the original. Vanilla Bavarois:This is a creamy vanilla bean bavarois, it is meant to be a melt-in-the-mouth texture andsignifies the cream from the original cake. Chocolate sauce:A rich chocolate sauce to enhance the chocolate flavour of the dish. The richness of thesauce helps to balance out the creaminess of the bavarois and tartness of the cherries. Chocolate soil:This adds to the texture of the dish and is chocolate to represent the chocolate (spongeand shavings) on the original cake. The crunchy granules make it a nice flavour that goeswith the rich chocolate cake. Cherry Granita:This cherry granita represents the kirsch soaked cherries and the kirsch sauce that isused to moisten the sponge. It adds a sweet cherry flavour to the dish and complements itnicely with the creamy vanilla and the chocolate components. Cherry:These are brandy soaked cherries that are there for the „cherry‟ component and it helps toadd texture and flavour. The cherries in the original recipe are one of the main componentsand so it was important to have that on my modernised dish and showcase them bysoaking them in brandy. Chocolate sticks:This adds height to the dish and is another chocolate component that adds texture. Mint:Mint is awesome, every dish should have mint because it completes any dessert you make:P
  • 13. Evaluations My dish came out the way I expected. It was creamy, chocolaty, had the cherry flavour and wasn‟t too rich that it was sickly sweet. It looks amazing (thanks Korey for the help!) and I‟m proud of the product I have served. I tested the product on my family and the level 3‟s. They both thought that it had amazing presentation, was delicious and the flavour combinations went together well. Overall a great result. Because of these evaluations I haven‟t changed my dish after my first product, apart from adding more gelatin in the bavarois, as it is presented in a modern way and meets the required brief.
  • 14. StakeholdersO 1. People who wish to sell this dessert at their restaurant. Because I have a food cost and have calculated all the necessary information it makes it easy for chefs to choose this as a dessert option.O 2. People on a diet. If you wish to eat a certain amount of calories but indulge in a dessert, the research I have gathered will show them exactly how much calories per serve. As well as people who are allergic to some ingredients.O 3. Food suppliers. If I wish to sell my dessert the food supplier has enough information to learn how much it will cost to manufacture it and sell it in a supermarket. If they wanted to simplify it, the dessert is made in a way that a simplified version is easy to achieve.O 4. People who wish to learn about the Black Forest Gateau and present it in a modern way. This gives them ideas about how they would plate and present the dish.
  • 15. Cultural and Dietary Needs O A cultural need of mine is that my dish would not be suitable for Muslims. Muslims are not allowed gelatine or alcohol and so they wouldn‟t be able to have the bavarois or the cherries and granita. This would mean that I would have to have some other forms of components such as a mousse with no gelatine, a non-alcohol filled granita and cherries that I could substitute with a juice. O As the years have past many other countries have changed the way the Black Forest Cake is made. Americans have added a non-alcoholic version and the Swiss have developed a cake that consists of layers of meringue with whipped cream and chocolate called Schwarzwaldtårta. O If someone was to eat my cake and would like a more nutritional version I would add low fat cream and milk as a substitute or reduce the amount of sugar in the dish. Although, if you were wanting it eat a Schwarzwaldtårta. cake, eat it without worrying about calories!! …Life is too short….
  • 16. Nutritional CalculatorObviously, with my high sugar and fat content, (due to the sweet ingredients) my dish is not very healthy. I would not eat this if you were on a diet as it is a “sometimes food” and you would need to go to a workout straight away! …..at least it tastes good haha 
  • 17. Food Cost
  • 18. Food cost with wagesTo produce one serve of my dish: For 2.5 hours of work This dish would be with one of the (making every component most expensive desserts in the from scratch) at $99 hour world. As the cost per serve is labour cost. expensive, one of the places you could serve this dessert could be at 247.50 (labour) + 2.17 (cost Wine3 at the Fortress, Galle in Sri of ingredients) = Lanka. This serves the worlds number 1 most expensive dish, The $249.67 per serve Fortress Aquamarine for $14,500 US. OR..
  • 19. Food Cost with WagesWith a food cost percentage of 24.74% and oneportion at $9.50 (incl. GST). Plus with labour of 2.5hours at 13.75hr = $34.38 + $9.50 =
  • 20. Future Trends• The Black Forest cake has changed slightly over the years since it was first invented. As we come into an age with more technical equipment the future trends could be that some of the processes could be made differently.• The cherries could be infused with kirsch in a machine that gives it a different texture and taste et cetera.• The portion sizes may well change to be smaller than they are now as people are usually going for tasty mouthfuls of food.• Because we are in the 21st century food is now more readily available. Back in the 20th century they may have only been able to make the cake once a year when the cherries were in season. Now that people are starting to have this accessibility we will be able to see foods throughout the year rather than seasonally. My dish is helped out by the fact that “The Black Forest” is local and growsthe cherries, this will save on transport costs and mean that more people in theregion can make the cake.• Molecular gastronomy is becoming well known, with some thanks to Heston Blumenthal. Components of the cake could be taken and added to using some molecular techniques such as Emulsifying, flavour pairing and smoking of ingredients.
  • 21. References http://www.javacoffeehouse.co.uk/Java-Coffee-House-Bath-Photos-Black-Forest-Cake-Gateau.html http://www.destination360.com/europe/germany/black-forest-photos http://momofukufor2.com/2010/07/cherry-clafoutis-recipe/ http://mi9.com/wallpaper/single-cherry_35832/ http://www.bazaardesigns.com/3990-red-fresh-cherry/ http://www.cookingetc.co.uk/tag/cherry/ http://www.buttermilkpress.com/blog/pie-recipes-easy-cherry-pie-recipe/ http://tripwow.tripadvisor.com/slideshow-photo/the-greatest-forests-of-germany-the-black-forest- stuttgart-germany.html?sid=12482562&fid=upload_12918521292-tpfil02aw-1241 http://www.conditorei-museum.de/texte9.htm 1. http://kitchenproject.com/history/BlackForestCake/index.htm http://primoapac01.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?dscnt=0&vl(1UI0)= contains&scp.scps=scope%3A%28EIT_Voyager%29%2Cprimo_central_multiple_fe&frbg=&tab=all_re sources&dstmp=1346622176183&srt=rank&ct=search&mode=Basic&dum=true&indx=1&tb=t&vl(5244 4011UI0)=any&vl(freeText0)=History+of+Black+Forest+Gateau&vid=EIT&fn=search http://www.google.co.nz/imgres?q=josef+keller+black+forest+cake http://zoqy.net/?p=2600 http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodcakes.html#blackforest 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Forest_cake http://www.vahrehvah.com/indianfood/black-forest-cake/ http://www.europeangiftpalace.com/The-German-Black-Forest-Tradition-History-and- Clocks:_:10000.html 3. http://davidgerman110.blogspot.co.nz/2010/09/black-forest-schwarzwald.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Forest http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-587042/Who-needs-gateau-Black-Forest.html http://www.google.co.nz/imgres?q=history+of+black+forest+gateau&um=1&hl=en&safe=active&sa=N& rls=com.microsoft:en-nz: http://www.timelineimages.com/search-cover-photos/black-forest-gateau#DT http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZQ7nwCJBlg

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