Lesson #8
Can Twitter Lead
a Revolution?
The Situation

•   Elections were held in Iran on Friday, June 12th; 10th
    presidential election since 1979 Islamic Rev...
What Happened

•   Demonstrations/protests began immediately
•   Protestors took to the Internet
•   Iranian military decl...
What role is
social media playing, if any?
“What is fascinating to me is the
 degree to which in Iran today - and in
 Lebanon - the more secular forces of
  moderati...
“When histories of the Iranian
   election are written, Twitter will
   doubtless be cast as a protagonal
technology that ...
“However things turn out in Iran, this
will probably be forever known as the
         Twitter Revolution.”




      -- Ke...
“Twitter is my new CNN.”




 -- Twitter user, Monday, June 15
“[T]his event hast been Twitter’s
            finest hour.”




-- Andrew Sullivan, The Atlantic Monthly and The
        Da...
“These are just a handful of data
points that have been shooting around
    the Internet, via Twitter or the
  opposition-...
“Twitter is so simplistic and silly that
it is a perfect digital tool to overthrow
 a government - which kind of makes
 th...
“This is the first revolution that has been catapulted
 onto a global stage and transformed by social media.
       I’ve be...
“Twitter’s impact inside Iran is zero.
Here, there is lots of buzz, but once
  you look...you see most of it are
    Ameri...
Questions?

         Emily                      Blake
ereeves@stoneward.com    brutherford@stoneward.com
   501.772.6142 (...
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Swim Lesson 8 Can Twitter Lead A Revoloution

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Swim Lesson 8 Can Twitter Lead A Revoloution

  1. 1. Lesson #8 Can Twitter Lead a Revolution?
  2. 2. The Situation • Elections were held in Iran on Friday, June 12th; 10th presidential election since 1979 Islamic Revolution • Decision between hard-line president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Mir Hossein Mousavi • Ahmadinejad declared the winner by a 2-to-1 landslide on Saturday, June 13th (Ahmadinejad with 62.6% of the vote to 33.75% for Mousavi) • Mousavi said the vote was tainted by widespread fraud and his followers responded with serious unrest 2
  3. 3. What Happened • Demonstrations/protests began immediately • Protestors took to the Internet • Iranian military declared that Iranian websites and blogs that “create tension” must pull down their content or face consequences • Foreign journalists were encouraged to leave the country and seemed to be restricted from reporting in the streets of Tehran • Information circulates that social media is playing some role: Facebook, Flickr,YouTube and Twitter • On Wednesday, June 17th, the U.S. State Department asks Twitter to delay routine maintenance which sparks immediate interest from the U.S. press 3
  4. 4. What role is social media playing, if any?
  5. 5. “What is fascinating to me is the degree to which in Iran today - and in Lebanon - the more secular forces of moderation have used technologies like Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, blogging and text-messaging as their virtual mosque, as the place they can now gather, mobilize, plan, inform and energize their supporters, outside the grip of the state.” -- Tom Friedman, NY Times, Tuesday, June 16
  6. 6. “When histories of the Iranian election are written, Twitter will doubtless be cast as a protagonal technology that enabled the powerless to survive a brutal crackdown and information blackout by the ruling authorities.” -- Marc Ambinder, The Atlantic Monthly, Monday, June 15
  7. 7. “However things turn out in Iran, this will probably be forever known as the Twitter Revolution.” -- Kevin Jones, MotherJones.com, Monday, June 15
  8. 8. “Twitter is my new CNN.” -- Twitter user, Monday, June 15
  9. 9. “[T]his event hast been Twitter’s finest hour.” -- Andrew Sullivan, The Atlantic Monthly and The Daily Dish blog, Monday June 15
  10. 10. “These are just a handful of data points that have been shooting around the Internet, via Twitter or the opposition-friendly blogs. And all have been instrumental in building a public opinion case against the Iranian government for undercounting the support for Mousavi. The problem is, none of them appear any longer to be true.” -- Joshua Kucera True/Slant, Monday, June 15
  11. 11. “Twitter is so simplistic and silly that it is a perfect digital tool to overthrow a government - which kind of makes the trendy microblogging service the Forrest Gump of international relations.” -- All Things Digital, Tuesday, June 16
  12. 12. “This is the first revolution that has been catapulted onto a global stage and transformed by social media. I’ve been thinking a lot about the Chicago demonstrations of 1968 where they chanted “the whole world is watching.” Really, that wasn’t true then. But this time it’s true...and people throughout the world are not only listening but responding. They’re engaging with individual participants, they’re passing on their messages to their friends, and they’re even providing detailed instructions to enable web proxies allowing Internet access that the authorities can’t immediately censor. That kind of participation is really extraordinary. -- Clay Shirkey, NYU Professor, Tuesday, June 16
  13. 13. “Twitter’s impact inside Iran is zero. Here, there is lots of buzz, but once you look...you see most of it are Americans tweeting among themselves.” -- Mehdi Yahyanejad, manager of a Farsi- language news site based in Los Angeles, Wednesday, June 17
  14. 14. Questions? Emily Blake ereeves@stoneward.com brutherford@stoneward.com 501.772.6142 (text) 501.772.6108 (text) @reeves501 @blakerutherford

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