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  • When a company faces crisis, it gains a forum to bolster or damage the brand – the way a crisis can take a life of its own is greater with social media. Its actions and behavior as well as how it communicates those actions and behavior determine the impact.
  • Strategic Direction is never more important than in a crisis. Think about a flight plan… However, too many decision makers can cause a bureaucratic backlog and prevent you from responding to issues in a timely manner. One way to combat this is by making sure they understand the process in place and when leadership will be called in to assess a situation. Understanding when to escalate is crucial in dealing with a crisis, which leads us into our next slide. As noted in the SOW, we will tailor this to Monster.ca’s social media/internal/PR team.
  • Social media leaders must find the most leveraged plan of action, stick with it and continually monitor the social media pages…
  • Create a Listening Strategy and Report Executives Are Interested In Fan/Follower Increases Customer Successes Celebrate Response Wins/Timeliness
  • Journalists research social media sites to do investigative reporting during a crisis. What is not current can hurt you… We are going to go through some scenarios with you today – and we have one we’d like you to consider how you’d respond to it. This is a just a training so lets walk through the brainstorming process together
  • TWC Website example during a crisis – outdated information was quoted in article as company fact Timing is everything Remove content that is old and outdated
  • in defense of a brand…examples
  • PHONE ICON
  • PHONE ICON
  • This strategy gives the brand more opportunity to guide the conversation, not the mob mentality…or E-ego. Centralize the discussion around your brand
  • Thank you so much for your time!  

Monster day 1 Monster day 1 Presentation Transcript

  • Adele Cehrs, President, Epic PR Group MONSTER.CA TRAINING: PART I Social Media Flash Crisis: Best Practices for Handling Negative Comments, Posts and Opinions
  • Session Overview
    • In this session, we’ll show you a 12 Step Process for how to protect your company against crises by:
      • Giving you guidelines for identifying what can go wrong.
      • Showing you how to position your company before a crisis happens.
      • Explaining why you should expect, and be ready for, “the worst.”
      • Telling you what to do in the face of a full-blown crisis, and what to do afterwards.
  • First Step to Prepare for Potential Crisis Issues
    • Understand Current Risks
    • Anticipate Potential Crisis Issues
    • Understanding and Anticipating: Trending Values
    1
  • Conduct an Internal Audit
      • Does your company have a wide range of customers that are unpredictable?
      • Does your company have employees or contractors that did not leave the company on good terms?
      • Are your employees or customers active and engaged on social media?
      • Does your company have an active social media presence?
      • Does your company have diversity issues?
      • Does your company have sexual harassment issues?
      • Does your company have financial problems? Has there ever been internal ethics issues?
      • Does your company have unsatisfied investors, customers, board members, etc.?
      • Has your company been a target from competitors or unsatisfied customers in the past?
    2
  • Scenario #1
    • A young business man was recently fired from his job for lying to his boss about why he was not able to participate in an after-hours conference call. The man had a previous engagement to attend a hockey game with friends and the tickets were very expensive and non-refundable. He told his boss he had a family emergency and therefore would not be able to attend. His boss, a fellow hockey fan, happened to see the young man cheering in the stands when he watched a recording of the game later that evening. 
    • The young man claims he was advised to tell his boss a fictitious reason for not attending by Monster Canada in their presentation “10 Things you can’t Tell Your Boss” and has taken to a variety of social media sites threatening litigation . He has posted an excerpt from the presentation -- “Don’t tell your boss you can’t stick around because you’re going to meet your colorist for a root touch up. You need to come up with a more compelling excuse” – on not only his personal social media sites, but a national newspaper blog/website. He is receiving lots of feedback from readers and those in the legal/employment field.  The story is now being picked up by local/national television stations.
      • What steps should Monster Canada take to help minimize the story?
      • What steps should/could have been taken to prevent the situation from escalating?
  • Assemble Crisis Response Team
    • Be Open, Yet Limit People Involved
    • Importance of Processes
    • Just in Case
        • IT Staff
        • Attorney Contact Info
        • SEO Expert
        • PR Contacts Internally/Externally
        • Notify Staff Internally (Proceed with Caution)
    3
  • Event Crisis Flowchart Reality Shows
  • Assign a “Chief Listening Officer”
    • Real Time Monitoring Strategies
    • Monitor/Track Overall Tone of Pages
    • Listening and Reporting: What the C-Suite Wants
    4
  • To Respond or to Not Respond
    • Keys to Understanding When to Respond
    • Use ONLY Positive Language
    • Responding to Customer Service Issues/Concerns Before They Happen
    5
  • Understand How Traditional Journalists Use Social Media in Crisis
    • According to the Society for New Communications Research (SNCR), 70 percent of journalists said they use social networks to assist in reporting (compared to 41 percent last year).
  • Scenario #2
    • A reporter recently read a presentation created by Monster Canada titled “Benefits of Bringing in Students” which was posted on an external share site. In the presentation, a slide discusses the role students can play in the workplace. Specifically, “Additional assistance in all sorts of tasks and projects ranging, from the smallest and most menial (that no one else wants to do) , to bigger and more complex.”
    • From this presentation, he was given the impression that Monster Canada is supporting and/or endorsing the exploitation of student workers . He has used this presentation/excerpt as an example in several articles which have appeared in a national publication, on the web, posted on his/company Facebook page and tweeted to all his followers.
    • As a result, Monster Canada is getting inquirers from the media and negative criticism via its social media sites . In addition students, labor organizations, civil rights groups etc have started to voice their displeasure with Monster Canada in both traditional and social media forums.
      • What should Monster Canada do?
      • What steps and/or policies could/should be implemented to prevent a similar situation?
  • Provide Positive/Current Digital Content
    • Develop “Social Media Editorial Calendar”
    • How an Editorial Calendar Can Help in a Crisis
    • Understand what content needs to be updated or removed to reflect current strategies
    6
  • Recruit Champions/Fans Before You Need Them…
    • Monster.ca Has Fans : Engage “Brandvocates”
    • Influence the Influencers
      • Klout Score/Involvement/Monitoring Tools for Engagement
    • Offer Structured Participation Models
    • Provide Social Media Examples
    7
  • Scenario #3
    • A corporate recruiter is utilizing Monster Canada’s Facebook articles/posts in some questionable recruiting practices. 
    • Specifically, he has posed as a perspective employee in the Virtual Job Fair and gathering personal information on job hunters for personal use. Additionally, he is “badmouthing” Monster in chat rooms, while steering job-seekers to his firm’s website.
    • What steps should be taken to mitigate this situation?
  • Be Transparent
    • Problems Arise: Own Up to Mistakes (When Appropriate)
    • Tell Them How You Are Generally Addressing the Issue
    8
  • Recent Crisis Examples
      • United Breaks Guitars
      • DKNY Bunny Killer
      • Weiner Crisis
      • Charlie Sheen Meltdown
      • Starbuck 9/11 Misstep
      • Toyota Recall
      • Delta Baggage Fees for Returning Military Men
      • Dominos
      • Gap Logo Crisis
  • Scenario #4 Dominos Pizza Crisis via YouTube
  • Setting Social Media Policies Internally/Externally
    • Enforcing Rules for Internal Staff
    • Setting House Rules for Fans/Followers
    • What NOT to Tolerate
    9
  • Crisis Drills and Crisis Brand Channels
    • Develop Crisis Channels to Communicate:
      • News stories, videos, fact sheets, etc.
      • Dedicated Twitter Page
      • Buttons for Questions on Company Website
      • Dark Website
    • Consider SEO Strategies
    10
  • Be Proactive
    • During a crisis, be sure to let the market know:
      • You're listening
    • Guide the discussion
    11
  • Remain Calm
    • It’s not personal (usually)
    • Don’t cloud your judgment –respond rationally; not emotionally
    • You cannot do EVERYTHING
    • Bring in the experts
    12
  • WE KNOW PEOPLE Adele R. Cehrs President Epic PR Group 703-299-3404 105 N Washington St, Suite 202 Alexandria, VA 22314 www.epicprgroup.com Twitter: EpicPRGroupDC