C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 289he cardiovascular system is the first major system to function in the embryo. The...
290 THE DEVELOPING HUMANGene expression analysis and lineage tracing experi-ments suggest that progenitor cells from the p...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 291F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 Drawing of the embryonic cardiovascular system (approximatel...
292 THE DEVELOPING HUMANiliac veins (Fig. 13-4D). The subcardinal and supracardi-nal veins gradually develop and replace a...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 293F I G U R E 1 3 – 4 Illustrations of the primordial veins of embryo bodies (vent...
294 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 5 Dorsal views of the developing heart. A, During the fourth week (approximately...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 295F I G U R E 1 3 – 6 CT scan showing a duplicated superiorvena cava. Note the aor...
296 THE DEVELOPING HUMANAs folding of the head region occurs, the heart andpericardial cavity come to lie ventral to the f...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 297F I G U R E 1 3 – 8 A, Dorsal view of an embryo (approximately 20 days). B, Sche...
298 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 9 Longitudinal sections through thecranial half of embryos during the fourth wee...
F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 0 A, Sagittal section of the heart at approximately 24 days, showing blood flow through it (arrows). B,...
300 THE DEVELOPING HUMANof the inner endocardial cells undergoes epithelial–mesenchymal transformation, which then invades...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 301F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 2 Drawings of the heart showing partitioning of the atrioven...
302 THE DEVELOPING HUMANSeptum primumSeptum primumRA, right atriumRV, right ventricleLA, left atriumLV, left ventricleFora...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 303Septum secundum (upper limb)Foramen secundumSeptum secundum (upper limb)Septum s...
304 THE DEVELOPING HUMANBy the end of the fourth week, the right horn of thesinus venosus is noticeably larger than the le...
F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 5 Diagrams illustrating the fate of the sinus venosus. A, Dorsal view of the heart (approximately 26 d...
306 THE DEVELOPING HUMANvenosus is a separate chamber of the heart and opens intothe dorsal wall of the right atrium (Fig....
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 307Partitioning of Primordial VentricleDivision of the primordial ventricle is first...
308 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 1 8 Sketches illustrating incorporation of the bulbus cordis into the ventricles...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 309F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 9 Schematic sections of the heart illustrating successive st...
310 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 2 0 A, Ultrasound imageshowing the four-chamber view of the heartin a fetus of a...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 311F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 1 Partitioning of the bulbus cordis and truncus arteriosus. ...
312 THE DEVELOPING HUMANConducting System of HeartInitially, the muscle in the primordial atrium and ventricleis continuou...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 313After incorporation of the sinus venosus, cells from itsleft wall are found in t...
314 THE DEVELOPING HUMANATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECTSAn atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common congenital heartdefect and occurs m...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 315F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 3 The embryonic heart tube during thefourth week. A, Normal ...
316 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 2 6 Drawings of the right aspect of the interatrial septum. The adjacent sketche...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 317F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 7 Dissection of an adult heart with a large patent oval fora...
318 THE DEVELOPING HUMANVENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTSVentricular septal defects (VSDs) are the most common typeof CHD, accoun...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 319TRANSPOSITION OF THE GREAT ARTERIESTransposition of the great arteries (TGA) is ...
320 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 1 Illustrations of the common types of persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA). A,...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 321F I G U R E 1 3 – 3 3 A, Drawing of an infant’s heart showing a small pulmonary ...
322 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 4 Abnormal division of the truncus arteriosus (TA). A to C, Sketches of transv...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 323F I G U R E 1 3 – 3 5 A, Ultrasound image of the heart of a 20-week fetus with t...
324 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 7 A, Ultrasound image of the heart of a second-trimester fetus with a hypoplas...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 325F I G U R E 1 3 – 3 8 Pharyngeal arches and pharyngealarch arteries. A, Left sid...
326 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 9 Schematic drawings illustrating the arterial changes that result during tran...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 327Derivatives of Sixth Pair ofPharyngeal Arch ArteriesThe left sixth pharyngeal ar...
328 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 4 0 The relation of the recurrent laryngealnerves to the pharyngeal arch arterie...
C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 329F I G U R E 1 3 – 4 1 A, Postductal coarctation of the aorta. B, Diagrammatic re...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order...
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Sample Chapter the Developing Human Clinically Oriented Embryology with Student Consult Online Access 9e by Moore To Order Call Sms At 91-8527622422

  1. 1. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 289he cardiovascular system is the first major system to function in the embryo. The pri-mordial heart and vascular system appear in the middle of the third week. This precociouscardiac development occurs because the rapidly growing embryo can no longer satisfy itsnutritional and oxygen requirements by diffusion alone. Consequently, there is a need foran efficient method of acquiring oxygen and nutrients from the maternal blood and dispos-ing of carbon dioxide and waste products. The cardiovascular system is derived mainly from:● Splanchnic mesoderm, which forms the primordium of the heart (Fig. 13-1A and B)● Paraxial and lateral mesoderm near the otic placodes289Cardiovascular SystemEarly Development of the Heart andBlood Vessels 290Development of Veins Associated withEmbryonic Heart 290Fate of Vitelline and Umbilical Arteries 295Later Development of the Heart 295Circulation through the PrimordialHeart 298Partitioning of Primordial Heart 300Changes in Sinus Venosus 304Conducting System of Heart 312Birth Defects of the Heart and GreatVessels 313Derivatives of Pharyngeal ArchArteries 324Derivatives of First Pair of Pharyngeal ArchArteries 324Derivatives of Second Pair of PharyngealArch Arteries 324Derivatives of Third Pair of Pharyngeal ArchArteries 325Derivatives of Fourth Pair of Pharyngeal ArchArteries 325Fate of Fifth Pair of Pharyngeal ArchArteries 325Derivatives of Sixth Pair of Pharyngeal ArchArteries 327Pharyngeal Arch Arterial Birth Defects 327Fetal and Neonatal Circulation 333Fetal Circulation 333Transitional Neonatal Circulation 333Derivatives of Fetal Vessels andStructures 337Development of Lymphatic System 339Development of Lymph Sacs and LymphaticDucts 339Development of Thoracic Duct 340Development of Lymph Nodes 340Development of Lymphocytes 340Development of Spleen and Tonsils 340Summary of Cardiovascular System 340Clinically Oriented Problems 341C H A P T E R13T
  2. 2. 290 THE DEVELOPING HUMANGene expression analysis and lineage tracing experi-ments suggest that progenitor cells from the pharyngealmesoderm, located anterior to the early heart tube (ante-rior heart field), gives rise to ventricular myocardiumand the myocardial wall of the outflow tract. Moreover,another wave of progenitor cells from the pharyngealmesoderm (second heart field) also contributes to therapid growth and elongation of the heart tube. The myo-cardium of the left ventricle and the anterior pole of theheart tube are derived mostly from the second field.Expression of Hes-1, expressed in pharyngeal endodermand mesoderm (second heart field) plays an essential rolefor the development of the outflow tract.The basic helix-loop-helix genes, dHAND andeHAND, are expressed in the paired primordial endo-cardial tubes and in later stages of cardiac morphogene-sis. The MEF2C and Pitx-2 genes, which are expressedin cardiogenic precursor cells emerging from the primitivestreak before formation of the heart tubes (Wnt3a–mediated), also appear to be essential regulators inearly cardiac development.Development of Veins Associatedwith Embryonic HeartThree paired veins drain into the tubular heart of a4-week embryo (Fig. 13-2):● Vitelline veins return poorly oxygenated blood fromthe umbilical vesicle (yolk sac).● Umbilical veins carry well-oxygenated blood from thechorionic sac.● Common cardinal veins return poorly oxygenatedblood from the body of the embryo.F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 Early development of the heart. A, Drawing of a dorsal view of an embryo (approximately 18 days). B, Transversesection of the embryo showing the angioblastic cords in the cardiogenic mesoderm and their relationship to the pericardial coelom.C, Longitudinal section of the embryo illustrating the relationship of the angioblastic cords to the oropharyngeal membrane, pericardialcoelom, and septum transversum.Umbilical vesiclewith bloodislandsLevel ofsection BHeart primordium(plexiform heart)Plane of section CPericardial coelomCardiogenic mesodermAngioblastic cordSeptumtransversumCardiogenicmesodermEmbryonic endoderm Splanchnic mesodermEmbryonic ectodermNeural plateCut edgeof amnionBloodvesselsSite of cloacalmembraneConnecting stalkSite oforopharyngealmembraneAC Angioblastic cord Cloacal membraneOropharyngeal membranePericardial coelomAmnionConnectingstalkAllantoisNeural plateBUmbilical vesicle● Pharyngeal mesoderm● Neural crest cells from the region between the oticvesicles and the caudal limits of the third pair ofsomitesBlood vessel development—angiogenesis—is describedin Chapter 4. Primordial blood vessels cannot be distin-guished structurally as arteries or veins, but they arenamed according to their future fates and relationshipto the heart.EARLY DEVELOPMENT OF THEHEART AND BLOOD VESSELSInductive signals from the anterior endoderm stimulatesearly formation of the heart. The earliest sign of theheart is the appearance of paired endothelial strands—angioblastic cords—in the cardiogenic mesoderm duringthe third week (Fig. 13-1B and C). These cords canalizeto form two thin heart tubes. As lateral embryonic foldingoccurs, the endocardial heart tubes approach each otherand fuse to form a single heart tube (see Figs. 13-7C and13-9C). Fusion of the heart tubes begins at the cranialend of the developing heart and extends caudally. Theheart begins to beat at 22 to 23 days (Fig. 13-2). Bloodflow begins during the fourth week and can be visualizedby Doppler ultrasonography (Fig. 13-3).Molecular studies show that more than 500 genes areinvolved in the development of the mammalian heart.Several members of the T-box family of genes play anessential role in lineage determination, specification ofthe cardiac chambers, valvuloseptal development, andthe formation of the conducting system.
  3. 3. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 291F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 Drawing of the embryonic cardiovascular system (approximately 26 days), showing vessels on the left side. Theumbilical vein carries well-oxygenated blood and nutrients from the chorionic sac to the embryo. The umbilical arteries carry poorlyoxygenated blood and waste products from the embryo to the chorionic sac (the outermost embryonic membrane).AmnionAmniotic cavityPharyngeal arch arteriesSinus venosusDorsal aortaUmbilical arteryAortic sacPrimordial heartVitelline veinUmbilical vesicleVitelline arteryUmbilical veinUmbilical cordChorionic sac(Primordial placenta)Anterior, common, and posterior cardinal veinsDorsal intersegmental arteriesThe vitelline veins follow the omphaloenteric duct intothe embryo. This duct is the narrow tube connecting theumbilical vesicle with the midgut (see Fig. 11-1). Afterpassing through the septum transversum, the vitellineveins enter the venous end of the heart—the sinus venosus(Figs. 13-2 and 13-4A). The left vitelline vein regresseswhile the right vitelline vein forms most of the hepaticportal system (Fig. 13-5B and C), as well as a portion ofthe inferior vena cava. As the liver primordium growsinto the septum transversum (see Chapter 11), the hepaticcords anastomose around preexisting endothelium-linedspaces. These spaces, the primordia of the hepatic sinu-soids, later become linked to the vitelline veins.The umbilical veins run on each side of the liver andcarry well-oxygenated blood from the placenta to thesinus venosus. As the liver develops, the umbilical veinslose their connection with the heart and empty into theliver. The right umbilical vein disappears during theseventh week, leaving the left umbilical vein as the onlyvessel carrying well-oxygenated blood from the placentato the embryo.Transformation of the umbilical veins may be sum-marized as follows (Fig. 13-5):● The right umbilical vein and the cranial part of the leftumbilical vein between the liver and the sinus venosusdegenerate.● The persistent caudal part of the left umbilical veinbecomes the umbilical vein, which carries all the bloodfrom the placenta to the embryo.● A large venous shunt—the ductus venosus (DV)—develops within the liver (Fig. 13-5B) and connects theumbilical vein with the inferior vena cava (IVC). TheDV forms a bypass through the liver, enabling most ofthe blood from the placenta to pass directly to theheart without passing through the capillary networksof the liver.The cardinal veins (Figs. 13-2 and 13-4A) constitutethe main venous drainage system of the embryo. Theanterior and posterior cardinal veins, the earliest veins todevelop, drain cranial and caudal parts of the embryo,
  4. 4. 292 THE DEVELOPING HUMANiliac veins (Fig. 13-4D). The subcardinal and supracardi-nal veins gradually develop and replace and supplementthe posterior cardinal veins.The subcardinal veins appear first (Fig. 13-4A). Theyare connected with each other through the subcardinalanastomosis and with the posterior cardinal veinsthrough the mesonephric sinusoids. The subcardinalveins form the stem of the left renal vein, the supra-renal veins, the gonadal veins (testicular and ovarian),and a segment of the inferior vena cava (IVC) (Fig.13-4D). The subcardinal veins become disrupted inthe region of the kidneys (Fig. 13-4C). Cranial to this,they become united by an anastomosis that is repre-sented in the adult by the azygos and hemiazygos veins(Figs. 13-4D and 13-5C). Caudal to the kidneys, theleft supracardinal vein degenerates, but the right supra-cardinal vein becomes the inferior part of the IVC(Fig. 13-4D).Development of Inferior Vena CavaThe IVC forms during a series of changes in the pri-mordial veins of the trunk that occur as blood, returningfrom the caudal part of the embryo, is shifted from theleft to the right side of the body. The IVC is composedof four main segments (Fig. 13-4C):● A hepatic segment derived from the hepatic vein (prox-imal part of right vitelline vein) and hepatic sinusoids● A prerenal segment derived from the right subcardinalvein● A renal segment derived from the subcardinal–supracardinal anastomosis● A postrenal segment derived from the right supracar-dinal veinrespectively. They join the common cardinal veins, whichenter the sinus venosus (Fig. 13-2). During the eighthweek, the anterior cardinal veins become connected byan anastomosis (Fig. 13-5A and B), which shunts bloodfrom the left to the right anterior cardinal vein. Thisanastomotic shunt becomes the left brachiocephalic veinwhen the caudal part of the left anterior cardinal veindegenerates (Figs. 13-4D and 13-5C). The superior venacava (SVC) forms from the right anterior cardinal veinand the right common cardinal vein.The posterior cardinal veins develop primarily as thevessels of the mesonephroi (interim kidneys) and largelydisappear with these transitory kidneys (see Chapter 12).The only adult derivatives of the posterior cardinalveins are the root of the azygos vein and the commonF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 Endovaginal scan of a 4-week embryo.A, Bright (echogenic) 2.4-mm embryo (calipers). B, Cardiac acti-vity of 116 beats per minute demonstrated with motion mode.Calipers used to encompass two beats. (Courtesy of Dr. E.A.Lyons, Professor of Radiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, andHuman Anatomy, University of Manitoba and Health SciencesCentre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.)ABANOMALIES OF VENAE CAVAEBecause of the many transformations that occur duringthe formation of the SVC and IVC, variations in theiradult form may occur. The most common anomaly ofthe IVC is for its abdominal course to be interrupted;as a result, blood drains from the lower limbs, abdomen,and pelvis to the heart through the azygos system ofveins.DOUBLE SUPERIOR VENAE CAVAEPersistence of the left anterior cardinal vein results in apersistent left SVC; hence, there are two superior venaecavae (Fig. 13-6). This condition causes a right to leftshunting of blood. The anastomosis that usually forms theleft brachiocephalic vein is small or absent. The abnormalleft SVC, derived from the left anterior cardinal andcommon cardinal veins, opens into the right atriumthrough the coronary sinus.
  5. 5. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 293F I G U R E 1 3 – 4 Illustrations of the primordial veins of embryo bodies (ventral views). Initially, three systems of veins are present:the umbilical veins from the chorion, the vitelline veins from the umbilical vesicle, and the cardinal veins from the body of the embryos.Next the subcardinal veins appear, and finally the supracardinal veins develop. A, At 6 weeks. B, At 7 weeks. C, At 8 weeks. D, Adult.This drawing illustrates the transformations that produce the adult venous pattern. (Modified from Arey LB: Developmental Anatomy,revised 7th ed. Philadelphia, WB Saunders, 1974.)C DSubcardinalanastomosisRenal v.Stem of internalspermatic v.Internalspermatic v.Iliac venousanastomosisof posteriorcardinal vv.L. brachiocephalic v.L. subclavian v.Oblique v.IVCHepatic v.Hemiazygos v.L. suprarenal v.L. renal v.L. internal spermatic v.or ovarian v.L. common iliac v.Median sacral v.Posteriorcardinal v.R. internaljugular v.R. externaljugular v.Superiorvena cavaAzygos v.IVCInferior venacava (IVC)Internal iliac v.External iliac v.R. suprarenal v.R. renal v.R. internalspermatic v.or ovarian v.Subclavian v.Commoncardinal v.Hepatic segmentof inferior vena cava(IVC)Prerenal segment ofIVC (subcardinal v.)Renal segment of IVC(subsupracardinalanastomosis)Postrenal segment ofIVC (supracardinal v.)External iliac v.Hypogastric v.Subcardinal v.BAnterior cardinal v.Sinus venosusAnterior cardinal v.Common cardinal v.Caudal extension ofhepatic segmentof IVCSupracardinal v.Subcardinal v.Subcardinal anastomosisSubsupracardinalanastomosisPosterior cardinal v.Iliac venous anastomosisof posterior cardinal vv.Common cardinal v.Vitelline and umbilical vv.Posterior cardinal v.Subcardinal anastomosisSubcardinal v.Anastomosisthrough mesonephros(early kidney)Iliac venousanastomosis ofpostcardinal vv.ACardinal, umbilical,and vitelline veinsSupracardinalveinsSubcardinalveinsHepaticsegmentRenalveinsv. - veinvv. - veins
  6. 6. 294 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 5 Dorsal views of the developing heart. A, During the fourth week (approximately 24 days), showing the primordialatrium, sinus venosus and veins draining into them. B, At 7 weeks, showing the enlarged right sinus horn and venous circulation throughthe liver. The organs are not drawn to scale. C, At 8 weeks, indicating the adult derivatives of the cardinal veins shown in A and B.Truncus arteriosusBulbus cordisRight horn of sinus venosusAnterior cardinal veinCommon cardinal veinPosterior cardinal veinVitelline and umbilical veinsPrimordial atriumLeft horn of sinus venosusAnterior cardinal veinCommon cardinal veinPosterior cardinal veinLeft horn of sinus venosusAnterior cardinal veinAnterior cardinal veinRight horn ofsinus venosusDegenerating rightumbilical veinInferior vena cavaLiverVitelline veins forming portal veinAnastomosis between anterior cardinal veinsCommon cardinal veinDegenerating proximal leftumbilical and vitelline veinsDuctus venosusSphincter inductus venosusPlacentaDuodenumFuture right atriumFuture left atriumOblique veinof left atriumLeft brachiocephalic veinSuperior vena cava (SVC)Truncus arteriosusRoot of azygos veinInferior vena cava (IVC)Coronary sinusPersistent portionof left umbilical veinABC
  7. 7. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 295F I G U R E 1 3 – 6 CT scan showing a duplicated superiorvena cava. Note the aorta (A), the right superior vena cava (R,unopacified), and the left superior vena cava (L, with contrast fromleft arm injection). (Courtesy of Dr. Blair Henderson, Departmentof Radiology, Health Sciences Centre, University of Manitoba,Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.)ALRLEFT SUPERIOR VENA CAVAThe left anterior cardinal vein and common cardinal veinmay form a left SVC, and the right anterior cardinal veinand common cardinal vein, which usually form the SVC,degenerate. As a result, blood from the right side iscarried by the brachiocephalic vein to the unusual leftSVC, which empties into the coronary sinus.ABSENCE OF HEPATIC SEGMENTOF INFERIOR VENA CAVAOccasionally the hepatic segment of the IVC fails to form.As a result, blood from inferior parts of the body drainsinto the right atrium through the azygos and hemiazygosveins. The hepatic veins open separately into the rightatrium.DOUBLE INFERIOR VENAE CAVAEIn unusual cases, the IVC inferior to the renal veins isrepresented by two vessels. Usually the left one is muchsmaller. This condition probably results from failure of ananastomosis to develop between the veins of the trunk(Fig. 13-4B). As a result, the inferior part of the leftsupracardinal vein persists as a second IVC.Pharyngeal Arch Arteries and OtherBranches of Dorsal AortaeAs the pharyngeal arches form during the fourth and fifthweeks, they are supplied by arteries—the pharyngeal archarteries—that arise from the aortic sac and terminate inthe dorsal aortae (Fig. 13-2). Initially, the paired dorsalaortae run through the entire length of the embryo. Later,the caudal portions of the aortae fuse to form a singlelower thoracic/abdominal aorta. Of the remaining paireddorsal aortae, the right one regresses and the left becomesthe primordial aorta.Intersegmental ArteriesThirty or so branches of the dorsal aorta, the interseg-mental arteries, pass between and carry blood to thesomites and their derivatives (Fig. 13-2). The interseg-mental arteries in the neck join to form a longitudinalartery on each side, the vertebral artery. Most of theoriginal connections of the intersegmental arteries to thedorsal aorta disappear.In the thorax, the intersegmental arteries persist asintercostal arteries. Most of the intersegmental arteries inthe abdomen become lumbar arteries, but the fifth pairof lumbar intersegmental arteries remains as the commoniliac arteries. In the sacral region, the intersegmentalarteries form the lateral sacral arteries.Fate of Vitelline and Umbilical ArteriesThe unpaired ventral branches of the dorsal aorta supplythe umbilical vesicle, allantois, and chorion (Fig. 13-2).The vitelline arteries pass to the vesicle and later theprimordial gut, which forms from the incorporated partof the umbilical vesicle. Only three vitelline artery deri-vatives remain: celiac arterial trunk to foregut, superiormesenteric artery to midgut, and inferior mesentericartery to hindgut.The paired umbilical arteries pass through the connect-ing stalk (primordial umbilical cord) and become con-tinuous with vessels in the chorion, the embryonic partof the placenta (Chapter 7). The umbilical arteries carrypoorly oxygenated blood to the placenta (Fig. 13-2).Proximal parts of the umbilical arteries become theinternal iliac arteries and superior vesical arteries, whereasdistal parts obliterate after birth and become medialumbilical ligaments.LATER DEVELOPMENT OF THE HEARTThe external layer of the embryonic heart tube—themyocardium—is formed from splanchnic mesoderm sur-rounding the pericardial cavity (Figs. 13-7A and B and13-8B). At this stage, the heart is composed of a thinendothelial tube, separated from a thick myocardiumby gelatinous connective tissue, known as cardiac jelly(Fig. 13-8C and D).The endothelial tube becomes the internal endotheliallining of the heart—endocardium—and the primordialmyocardium becomes the muscular wall of the heartor myocardium. The visceral pericardium or epicardiumis derived from mesothelial cells that arise from the
  8. 8. 296 THE DEVELOPING HUMANAs folding of the head region occurs, the heart andpericardial cavity come to lie ventral to the foregut andcaudal to the oropharyngeal membrane (Fig. 13-9). Con-currently, the tubular heart elongates and develops alter-nate dilations and constrictions (Fig. 13-7C to E): thebulbus cordis (composed of the truncus arteriosus [TA],the conus arteriosus, and the conus cordis), ventricle,atrium, and sinus venosus.The TA is continuous cranially with the aortic sac(Fig. 13-10A), from which the pharyngeal arch arteriesexternal surface of the sinus venosus and spread over themyocardium (Fig. 13-7D and F).Prior to the formation of the heart tube, the homeoboxtranscription factor (Pitx2c) is expressed in the left heartforming field and plays an important role in the left-rightpatterning of the heart tube during formation of thecardiac loop. Progenitor cells added to the rostral andcaudal poles of the heart tube from a proliferative poolof mesodermal cells located in the dorsal wall of thepericardial cavity and the pharyngeal arches.F I G U R E 1 3 – 7 Drawings showing fusion of the heart tubes and looping of the tubular heart. A to C, Ventral views of thedeveloping heart and pericardial region (22–35 days). The ventral pericardial wall has been removed to show the developing myocar-dium and fusion of the two heart tubes to form a tubular heart. The endothelium of the heart tube forms the endocardium of theheart. D and E, As the straight tubular heart elongates, it bends and undergoes looping, which forms a D-loop that produces aS-shaped heart.BA CED1st pharyngealarch artery1st pharyngealarch arteryAmnionNeural foldFuture forebrainBulbuscordisPrimordialatriumPrimordialatriumEpicardiumMyocardiumEndocardiumCardiac jellyPericardialcavityHearttubeVitelline veinCommoncardinal veinVentriclePrimordial pharynxPericardial cavityMyocardiumWall ofumbilical vesicleEndocardialheart tubesSites of fusion ofendocardial heart tubesTruncusarteriosus2nd pharyngealarch arteryFuture leftventricleAmnion1st pharyngealarcharteryForegutNeural grooveFuturerightventricleUmbilical vein1st pharyngeal archarteryNeural foldNeural grooveBulbuscordisPrimordialatriumVentricleSinusvenosusTruncusarteriosusUmbilical veinLeft vitelline vein Cavity of umbilical vesicle
  9. 9. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 297F I G U R E 1 3 – 8 A, Dorsal view of an embryo (approximately 20 days). B, Schematic transverse section of the heart region ofthe embryo illustrated in A, showing the two heart tubes and the lateral folds of the body. C, Transverse section of a slightly olderembryo showing the formation of the pericardial cavity and fusion of the heart tubes. D, Similar section (approximately 22 days) showingthe tubular heart suspended by the dorsal mesocardium. E, Schematic drawing of the heart (approximately 28 days) showing degen-eration of the central part of the dorsal mesocardium and formation of the transverse pericardial sinus. The tubular heart now has aD-loop. F, Transverse section of the embryo at the level indicated in E, showing the layers of the heart wall.A BC DE FAmnionPericardial coelom(future pericardialcavity)Mesenchyme(embryonicconnective tissue)Neural grooveNeural foldNotochordLateralfoldDorsal aortaWall of umbilical vesicleHeart tubeNeural grooveDorsal aortaPericardial cavityFusing endocardialheart tubesWall oftubular heartParietal pericardiumEpicardium(visceralpericardium)Cardiac jellyMyocardiumDorsal mesocardiumNeural foldNeural groove3rd somitePrimitive nodeLevel ofsection BPrimitive streakCut edge of amnion Pericardial coelom(ventral to brain)AmnionForegutTruncus arteriosusRemnant of dorsal mesocardiumSomiteEndocardiumFusion ofdorsal aortaeMyocardiumEpicardiumForegutTransversepericardial sinusSinus venosusHeart wallAtriumCut edge ofparietal pericardiumBulboventricularloopLevel of section F
  10. 10. 298 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 9 Longitudinal sections through thecranial half of embryos during the fourth week, showing theeffect of the head fold (arrows) on the position of the heart andother structures. A and B, As the head fold develops, thetubular heart and pericardial cavity move ventral to the foregutand caudal to the oropharyngeal membrane. C, Note that thepositions of the pericardial cavity and septum transversum havereversed with respect to each other. The septum transversumnow lies posterior to the pericardial cavity, where it will formthe central tendon of the diaphragm.ACBAmnionPrimordial brainNotochordOropharyngeal membraneOropharyngeal membraneDeveloping forebrainDeveloping spinal cordOropharyngeal membraneEndodermForegutForegutPericardial cavityPericardial cavityPericardial cavityHeart tubeHeart tube (cut ends)Heart (cut ends)Septum transversum Septum transversumSeptum transversumarise. The sinus venosus receives the umbilical, vitelline,and common cardinal veins from the chorion, umbilicalvesicle, and embryo, respectively (Fig. 13-10B). The arte-rial and venous ends of the heart are fixed by the pha-ryngeal arches and septum transversum, respectively. Thetubular heart undergoes a dextral (right-handed) loopingat approximately 23 to 28 days, forming a U-shapedD-loop that results in a heart with the apex pointing tothe left (Fig. 13-7D and E and 13-8E).The signaling molecule(s) and cellular mechanismsresponsible for cardiac looping are largely unknown. Asthe primordial heart bends, the atrium and sinus venosuscome to lie dorsal to the TA, bulbus cordis, and ventricle(Fig. 13-10B and C). By this stage, the sinus venosus hasdeveloped lateral expansions, the right and left sinushorns (Fig. 13-5A).As the heart elongates and bends, it gradually invagi-nates into the pericardial cavity (Figs. 13-7B to D and13-8C). The heart is initially suspended from the dorsalwall by a mesentery, the dorsal mesocardium, but thecentral part of this mesentery soon degenerates, forminga communication, the transverse pericardial sinus,between the right and left sides of the pericardial cavity(Fig. 13-8E and F). The heart is now attached only at itscranial and caudal ends.Circulation through the Primordial HeartThe initial contractions of the heart are of myogenicorigin (in or starting from muscle). The muscle layers ofthe atrium and ventricle outflow tract are continuous,and contractions occur in peristalsis-like waves that beginin the sinus venosus. At first, circulation through theprimordial heart is an ebb-and-flow type; however, bythe end of the fourth week, coordinated contractions ofthe heart result in unidirectional flow. Blood enters thesinus venosus (Fig. 13-10A and B) from the:● Embryo through the common cardinal veins● Developing placenta through the umbilical veins● Umbilical vesicle through the vitelline veinsBlood from the sinus venosus enters the primordialatrium; flow from it is controlled by sinuatrial (SA) valves(Fig. 13-11A to D). The blood then passes through theatrioventricular (AV) canal into the primordial ventricle.When the ventricle contracts, blood is pumped throughthe bulbus cordis and truncus arteriosus (TA) into theaortic sac, from which it is distributed to the pharyngealarch arteries in the pharyngeal arches (Fig. 13-10C).The blood then passes into the dorsal aortae for distribu-tion to the embryo, umbilical vesicle, and placenta (seeFig. 13-2).
  11. 11. F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 0 A, Sagittal section of the heart at approximately 24 days, showing blood flow through it (arrows). B, Dorsalview of the heart at approximately 26 days, showing the horns of the sinus venosus and the dorsal location of the primordial atrium.C, Ventral view of the heart and pharyngeal arch arteries (approximately 35 days). The ventral wall of the pericardial sac has beenremoved to show the heart in the pericardial cavity.ABCDorsal aortaAortic sacAortic sacCut edge ofpericardiumPrimordial atriumRight atriumSinuatrial valveDorsal and ventralendocardial cushions1st pharyngeal arch arteryTruncus arteriosusBulbus cordisBulbus cordisBulbus cordisBulboventricular groovePrimordial ventriclePrimordialventriclePrimordial atriumLeft horn of sinus venosusRight horn of sinus venosusOpening of sinusvenosus into atriumLeft common cardinal veinRight anterior cardinal veinRight common cardinal veinRight posterior cardinal veinLeft posterior cardinal veinLeft umbilical veinRight umbilical veinLeft vitelline vein Right vitelline veinPharyngeal arch arteriesDorsal aortaTruncus arteriosusTruncus arteriosusLeft atriumVentricle1st2nd3rd4th5th6thCardiac jellyCommon cardinal veinSinus venosusAtrioventricular canal
  12. 12. 300 THE DEVELOPING HUMANof the inner endocardial cells undergoes epithelial–mesenchymal transformation, which then invades theextracellular matrix. The transformed AV endocardialcushions contribute to the formation of the valves andmembranous septa of the heart.Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β1 and TGF-β2),bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2A and BMP-4), thezinc finger protein Slug, and an activin receptor–likekinase (ChALK2) have been reported to be involved inthe epithelial–mesenchymal transformation and forma-tion of the endocardial cushions.Partitioning of Primordial AtriumBeginning at the end of the fourth week, the primordialatrium is divided into right and left atria by the formationand subsequent modification and fusion of two septa:the septum primum and septum secundum (Figs. 13-12and 13-13).The septum primum, a thin crescent-shaped mem-brane, grows toward the fusing endocardial cushionsfrom the roof of the primordial atrium, partiallydividing the common atrium into right and left halves.F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 1 A and B, Sagittal sections of the heart during the fourth and fifth weeks, illustrating blood flow through theheart and division of the atrioventricular canal. The arrows are passing through the sinuatrial (SA) orifice. C, Fusion of the atrioventricularendocardial cushions. D, Coronal section of the heart at the plane shown in C. Note that the septum primum and interventricular septahave started to develop.Truncus arteriosusSinuatrial orificeSinus venosusPrimordial atriumPrimordial atriumVentral AtrioventricularendocardialcushionsDorsalPrimordial right ventriclePlane of section DFused atrioventricularendocardial cushionsFused atrioventricularendocardial cushionsPrimordial interventricular septumArrow passing throughright atrioventricular canalSeptum primumSinuatrial valve guardingorifice of sinus venosusForamen primumLeft atrioventricular canalAtrioventricular canalBulbus cordisPrimordial ventricleA BC DRightatriumPartitioning of Primordial HeartPartitioning of the atrioventricular canal, primordialatrium, ventricle, and outflow tract begins around themiddle of the fourth week and is essentially completed bythe end of the eighth week. Although described sepa-rately, these processes occur concurrently.Partitioning of Atrioventricular CanalToward the end of the fourth week, atrioventricularendocardial cushions form on the dorsal and ventralwalls of the atrioventricular (AV) canal. As these massesof tissue are invaded by mesenchymal cells during thefifth week (Fig. 13-11B), the AV endocardial cushionsapproach each other and fuse, dividing the AV canal intoright and left AV canals (Fig. 13-11C and D). Thesecanals partially separate the primordial atrium from theprimordial ventricle, and the endocardial cushions func-tion as AV valves. The septal valves are derived from thefused superior and inferior endocardial cushions. Themural leaflets are mesenchymal in origin.The AV endocardial cushions develop from a special-ized extracellular matrix (cardiac jelly). After inductivesignals from the myocardium of the AV canal, a segment
  13. 13. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 301F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 2 Drawings of the heart showing partitioning of the atrioventricular (AV) canal, primordial atrium, and ventricle.A, Sketch showing the plane of the sections. B, Frontal section of the heart during the fourth week (approximately 28 days) showingthe early appearance of the septum primum, interventricular septum, and dorsal atrioventricular endocardial cushion. C, Similar sectionof the heart (approximately 32 days) showing perforations in the dorsal part of the septum primum. D, Section of the heart (appro-ximately 35 days) showing the foramen secundum. E, Section of the heart (at approximately 8 weeks, showing the heart after it ispartitioned into four chambers. The arrow indicates the flow of well-oxygenated blood from the right into the left atrium. F, Sonogramof a second trimester fetus showing the four chambers of the heart. Note the septum secundum (arrow). (Courtesy of Dr. G.J. Reid,Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Manitoba, Women’s Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba,Canada.)A BCDETruncus arteriosus (TA)Bulbus cordisRight common cardinal veinSinus venosusSinuatrial (SA) orificeSinuatrial orificeForamensecundumForamen primumEndocardial cushionSeptum primumPerforations inseptum primumSeptum secundumSeptum primumOrifice of sinus venosusSeptum secundumSeptum secundumForamen secundumSeptum primumMitral valvePapillary musclesTricuspid valveFusion of septumprimum to AV endocardialcushionsFused arterioventricular (AV)endocardial cushionsSeptum primumDorsal atrioventricularendocardial cushionSuperior vena cava (SVC)SVCCrista terminalisOrifice of SVCEntrance ofpulmonary veinsAtrioventricular canals(right and left)Valve of sinus venosusValve of sinus venosusAtriumVentricleLeft ventricleLeft ventriclePrimordial interventricular septumInterventricular septumLeft atrioventricular canalInterventricular foramenPlane of sections B to EFF
  14. 14. 302 THE DEVELOPING HUMANSeptum primumSeptum primumRA, right atriumRV, right ventricleLA, left atriumLV, left ventricleForamen primumForamen primumForamen primumDeveloping septum secundumForamen primum closedPrimordialAV septumForamen secundumForamen secundumFused endocardial cushionsPerforations of septum primum duringdevelopment of foramen secundumDorsal endocardial cushionsA1B1C1D1LARABCDARed arrows–well-oxygenated blood Blue arrows–poorly oxygenated bloodRARVRA LARV LVF I G U R E 1 3 – 1 3 Diagrammatic sketches illustrating progressive stages in partitioning of the primordial atrium. A to H, Sketchesof the developing interatrial septum as viewed from the right side. A1 to H1 are coronal sections of the developing interatrial septum.
  15. 15. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 303Septum secundum (upper limb)Foramen secundumSeptum secundum (upper limb)Septum secundum (lower limb)Oval foramen(foramen ovale)Oval foramenDegenerating part ofseptum primumOval foramen closedby valve of oval foramenSuperior vena cavaOval foramen openValve of oval foramenInferior vena cava(carrying well-oxygenated blood)Valve of oval foramen(derived from septum primum)Septum secundum (lower limb)E1EF1FG1GH1HRemnant of foramen secundumAs the septum secundum grows, note that it overlaps the opening in the septum primum, theforamen secundum. Observe the valve of the oval foramen in G1 and H1. When pressure in the right atrium exceeds that in the leftatrium, blood passes from the right to the left side of the heart. When the pressures are equal or higher in the left atrium, the valvecloses the oval foramen (G1).F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 3 , C O N T ’ D
  16. 16. 304 THE DEVELOPING HUMANBy the end of the fourth week, the right horn of thesinus venosus is noticeably larger than the left horn(Fig. 13-15A). As this occurs, the sinuatrial (SA) orificemoves to the right and opens in the part of the primordialatrium that will become the adult right atrium (Figs.13-11 and 13-15C). As the right horn of the sinus venosusenlarges, it receives all the blood from the head and neckthrough the SVC and from the placenta and caudalregions of the body through the IVC. Initially, the sinusAs the curtain-like septum primum grows, a largeopening, the foramen primum, is located between itscrescentic free edge and the endocardial cushions (Figs.13-12C and 13-13A to C). This foramen serves as ashunt, enabling oxygenated blood to pass from theright to the left atrium. The foramen primum becomesprogressively smaller and disappears as the septumprimum fuses with the fused AV endocardial cushionsto form a primordial AV septum (Fig. 13-13D and D1).Before the foramen primum disappears, perforations,produced by apoptosis, appear in the central part of theseptum primum. As the septum fuses with the fused endo-cardial cushions, these perforations coalesce to formanother opening in the septum primum, the foramensecundum. Concurrently, the free edge of the septumprimum fuses with the left side of the fused endocardialcushions, obliterating the foramen primum (Figs. 13-12Dand 13-13D). The foramen secundum ensures continuedshunting of oxygenated blood from the right to the leftatrium.The septum secundum, a thick crescentic muscularfold, grows from the ventrocranial wall of the rightatrium, immediately adjacent to the septum primum (seeFig. 13-13D1). As this thick septum grows during the fifthand sixth weeks, it gradually overlaps the foramen secun-dum in the septum primum (see Fig. 13-13E). The septumsecundum forms an incomplete partition between theatria; consequently, an oval foramen (foramen ovale)forms. The cranial part of the septum primum, initiallyattached to the roof of the left atrium, gradually disap-pears (Fig. 13-13G1 and H1). The remaining part of theseptum primum, attached to the fused endocardial cush-ions, forms the flap-like valve of the oval foramen.Before birth, the oval foramen allows most of theoxygenated blood entering the right atrium from the IVCto pass into the left atrium (Fig. 13-14A). This foramenprevents the passage of blood in the opposite directionbecause the septum primum closes against the relativelyrigid septum secundum (Fig. 13-14B).After birth, the oval foramen functionally closes dueto higher pressure in the left atrium than in the rightatrium. Approximately at 3 months of age, the valve ofthe oval foramen fuses with the septum secundum,forming the oval fossa (fossa ovalis).Changes in Sinus VenosusInitially, the sinus venosus opens into the center of thedorsal wall of the primordial atrium, and its right andleft horns are approximately the same size (Fig. 13-5A).Progressive enlargement of the right horn results fromtwo left-to-right shunts of blood:● The first shunt results from transformation of the vitel-line and umbilical veins.● The second shunt occurs when the anterior cardinalveins are connected by an anastomosis (Fig. 13-5B andC). This communication shunts blood from the left tothe right anterior cardinal vein. This shunt becomesthe left brachiocephalic vein. The right anterior cardi-nal vein and the right common cardinal vein becomethe superior vena cava (SVC) (Fig. 13-15C).F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 4 Diagrams illustrating the relationship ofthe septum primum to the oval foramen and septum secundum.A, Before birth, well-oxygenated blood is shunted from the rightatrium through the oval foramen into the left atrium when thepressure increases. When the pressure decreases in the rightatrium, the flap-like valve of the oval foramen is pressed againstthe relatively rigid septum secundum. This closes the ovalforamen. B, After birth, the pressure in the left atrium increasesas the blood returns from the lungs. Eventually the septumprimum is pressed against the septum secundum and adheresto it, permanently closing the oval foramen and forming theoval fossa.BEFORE BIRTHRIGHT ATRIUMHIGHER PRESSURELEFT ATRIUMLOWER PRESSURESeptum secundumSeptum primum(valve of oval foramen)Oval foramenShuntLEFT ATRIUMHIGHER PRESSURERIGHT ATRIUMLOWER PRESSURESeptum secundumSeptum primumOval fossaABAFTER BIRTH
  17. 17. F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 5 Diagrams illustrating the fate of the sinus venosus. A, Dorsal view of the heart (approximately 26 days) showingthe primordial atrium and sinus venosus. B, Dorsal view at 8 weeks after incorporation of the right horn of the sinus venosus into theright atrium. The left horn of the sinus horn becomes the coronary sinus. C, Internal view of the fetal right atrium showing: (1) thesmooth part of the wall of the right atrium (sinus venarum) that is derived from the right horn of the sinus venosus and (2) the cristaterminalis and valves of the inferior vena cava and coronary sinus that are derived from the right sinuatrial valve. The primordial rightatrium becomes the right auricle, a conical muscular pouch.ALeft anterior cardinal veinLeft horn of sinus venosusPrimordial atriumFuture superior vena cavaInferior vena cavaRight horn of sinus venosusSite of opening of sinus venosusinto right atriumLeft common cardinal veinLeft horn of sinus venosusBAortaPulmonary arteryPulmonary veinsOblique vein of left atriumCoronary sinusSuperior vena cavaSinus venarum of right atriumSulcus terminalisRight auricleInferior vena cavaMiddle cardiac veinCCrista terminalisSinus venarum(smooth partof wall)Rough partof wallSuperior vena cavaSeptum secundumOval foramenSeptum primumValve of coronary sinusValve of inferior vena cavaRight auricleRight horn of sinus venosus
  18. 18. 306 THE DEVELOPING HUMANvenosus is a separate chamber of the heart and opens intothe dorsal wall of the right atrium (Fig. 13-10A and B).The left horn becomes the coronary sinus, and the righthorn is incorporated into the wall of the right atrium (Fig.13-15B and C).Because it is derived from the sinus venosus, thesmooth part of the wall of the right atrium is called thesinus venarum (Fig. 13-15B and C). The remainder ofthe anterior internal surface of the atrial wall and theconical muscular pouch, the right auricle, have a roughtrabeculated appearance. These two parts are derivedfrom the primordial atrium. The smooth part and therough part are demarcated internally in the right atriumby a vertical ridge, the crista terminalis, and externallyby a shallow groove, the sulcus terminalis (Fig. 13-15Band C).The crista terminalis represents the cranial part of theright SA valve (Fig. 13-15C); the caudal part of this valveforms the valves of the IVC and coronary sinus. The leftSA valve fuses with the septum secundum and is incor-porated with it into the interatrial septum.Primordial Pulmonary Vein andFormation of Left AtriumMost of the wall of the left atrium is smooth because itis formed by incorporation of the primordial pulmonaryvein (Fig. 13-16). This vein develops as an outgrowth ofF I G U R E 1 3 – 1 6 Diagrammatic sketches illustrating absorption of the pulmonary vein into the left atrium. A, At 5 weeks,showing the primordial pulmonary vein opening into the primordial left atrium. B, Later stage showing partial absorption of theprimordial pulmonary vein. C, At 6 weeks, showing the openings of two pulmonary veins into the left atrium resulting from absorptionof the primordial pulmonary vein. D, At 8 weeks, showing four pulmonary veins with separate atrial orifices. The primordial left atriumbecomes the left auricle, a tubular appendage of the atrium. Most of the left atrium is formed by absorption of the primordial pulmo-nary vein and its branches.Pulmonary veinsPrimordial left atriumPrimordial left atriumEntrance of four pulmonary veinsSmooth-walled part of left atriumLeft auricleRight and left pulmonary veinsPart of left atrium formed fromabsorbed primordial pulmonary veintissuePrimordial pulmonary veinPrimordial left atriumA BC Dthe dorsal atrial wall, just to the left of the septumprimum. As the atrium expands, the primordial pulmo-nary vein and its main branches are incorporated into thewall of the left atrium. As a result, four pulmonary veinsare formed (Fig. 13-16C and D).Molecular studies have confirmed that atrial myoblastsmigrate into the walls of the pulmonary veins. Thefunctional significance of this pulmonary cardiac muscle(pulmonary myocardium) is uncertain. The small leftauricle is derived from the primordial atrium; its internalsurface has a rough trabeculated appearance.ANOMALOUS PULMONARYVENOUS CONNECTIONSIn total anomalous pulmonary venous connections, noneof the pulmonary veins connects with the left atrium.They open into the right atrium or into one of the sys-temic veins or both. In partial anomalous pulmonaryvenous connections, one or more pulmonary veins havesimilar anomalous connections; the others have normalconnections.
  19. 19. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 307Partitioning of Primordial VentricleDivision of the primordial ventricle is first indicatedby a median ridge—the muscular interventricular (IV)septum—in the floor of the ventricle near its apex(Fig. 13-12B). Myocytes from both the left and rightprimordial ventricles contribute to the formation of themuscular part of the IV septum. The IV septum has aconcave free edge (Fig. 13-17A). Initially, the IV septumattains most of its height from dilation of the ventricleson each side of the muscular IV septum (Fig. 13-17B).Later, there is active proliferation of myoblasts in theseptum, which increase its size.Until the seventh week, there is a crescent-shaped IVforamen between the free edge of the IV septum and thefused endocardial cushions. The IV foramen permitscommunication between the right and left ventricles (Figs.13-17 and 13-18B). The IV foramen usually closes by theend of the seventh week as the bulbar ridges fuse withthe endocardial cushion (Fig. 13-18C to E).Closure of the IV foramen and formation of the mem-branous part of the IV septum result from the fusion oftissues from three sources: the right bulbar ridge, the leftbulbar ridge, and the endocardial cushion. The membra-nous part of the IV septum is derived from an extensionof tissue from the right side of the endocardial cushionto the muscular part of the IV septum. This tissue mergeswith the aorticopulmonary septum and the thick muscu-lar part of the IV septum (Figs. 13-18E and 13-19C).After closure of the IV foramen and formation of themembranous part of the IV septum, the pulmonary trunkis in communication with the right ventricle and the aortacommunicates with the left ventricle (Fig. 13-18E).F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 7 Schematic diagrams illustrating partitioning of the primordial heart. A, Sagittal section late in the fifth weekshowing the cardiac septa and foramina. B, Coronal section at a slightly later stage illustrating the directions of blood flow throughthe heart (blue arrows) and expansion of the ventricles (black arrows).Plane of section BSeptum primumclosing ovalforamenCommon cardinal veinOrifice of superior vena cavaSeptum secundumMargin of oval foramenOrifice of inferior vena cavaFused atrioventricularendocardial cushionsInterventricular foramenInterventricular septumSuperior vena cavaEntrance ofpulmonary veinsSeptum primumRight and leftatrioventricularcanalsA BInterventricular grooveFETAL CARDIAC ULTRASONOGRAPHYCardiac screening using high-resolution real-time ultra-sonography is usually performed between 18 and 22weeks of gestation (Fig. 13-20) because the heart is largeenough to examine.Partitioning of Bulbus Cordisand Truncus ArteriosusDuring the fifth week, active proliferation of mesenchy-mal cells in the walls of the bulbus cordis results in theformation of bulbar ridges (conotruncal ridges) (Figs.13-18C and D and 13-21B and C). Similar ridges thatare continuous with the bulbar ridges form in the truncusarterious (TA). The bulbar and truncal ridges are derivedlargely from neural crest mesenchyme.Neural crest cells migrate through the primordialpharynx and pharyngeal arches to reach the ridges. Asthis occurs, the bulbar and truncal ridges undergo a 180-degree spiraling.Cavitation of the ventricular walls forms a sponge-work of muscular bundles—trabeculae carneae. Some ofthese bundles become the papillary muscles and tendi-nous cords (chordae tendineae). The tendinous cords runfrom the papillary muscles to the AV valves (Fig. 13-19Cand D).
  20. 20. 308 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 1 8 Sketches illustrating incorporation of the bulbus cordis into the ventricles and partitioning of the bulbus cordisand truncus arteriosus into the aorta and pulmonary trunk. A, Sagittal section at 5 weeks showing the bulbus cordis as one of thechambers of the primordial heart. B, Schematic coronal section at 6 weeks, after the bulbus cordis has been incorporated into theventricles to become the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle, which gives origin to the pulmonary trunk and the aortic vestibule ofthe left ventricle. The arrow indicates blood flow. C to E, Schematic drawings illustrating closure of the interventricular foramen andformation of the membranous part of the interventricular septum. The walls of the truncus arteriosus, bulbus cordis, and right ventriclehave been removed. C, At 5 weeks, showing the bulbar ridges and fused atrioventicular endocardial cushions. D, At 6 weeks, showinghow proliferation of subendocardial tissue diminishes the interventricular foramen. E, At 7 weeks, showing the fused bulbar ridges, themembranous part of the interventricular septum formed by extensions of tissue from the right side of the atrioventricular endocardialcushions, and closure of the interventricular foramen.A BPharyngeal archarteriesTruncusarteriosus(TA)BulbuscordisAtriumAtrioventricular canalRight atrioventricular canalAorticopulmonary septumPulmonary trunkRight ventricleLeft bulbar ridgeMembranous part ofinterventricular septumMuscular part ofinterventricular septumLeft atrioventricularcanalSinus venosusConusarteriosusPulmonary trunkPulmonary trunkBulbar ridgeRightbulbarridgeLeft bulbar ridgeFree edge of muscularpart of interventricularseptumArch of aortaAortic vestibuleInterventricular foramenInterventricularforamenInterventricular septumInterventricular grooveLeft ventricleFused atrioventricularendocardial cushionsRight ventriclePrimordialinterventricularseptumRight bulbar ridgeEndocardial cushionDCE
  21. 21. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 309F I G U R E 1 3 – 1 9 Schematic sections of the heart illustrating successive stages in the development of the atrioventricular valves,tendinous cords, and papillary muscles. A, At 5 weeks. B, At 6 weeks. C, At 7 weeks. D, At 20 weeks, showing the conducting systemof the heart.Right common cardinal veinSeptum spuriumRight and left valves of sinus venosusLeft atriumLeft atrioventricular canalValve swellingsValve swellingsVentricular wallInterventricular septumCrista terminalisSinuatrial (SA) nodeAtrioventricular (AV) nodeOval foramenCusps of mitral valveTendinous cords(chordae tendineae)Papillary muscleBranches of AV bundleCusps oftricuspid valveDeveloping mitral valveMembranous part ofinterventricular septumTrabeculae carneaeAtrioventricular (AV)bundleSeptum primumInterventricular foramenLumen of left ventricleSinuatrial orificeSuperior vena cavaMuscular part ofIV septumA BC D
  22. 22. 310 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 2 0 A, Ultrasound imageshowing the four-chamber view of the heartin a fetus of approximately 20 weeks gestation.B, Orientation sketch (modified from the AIUMTechnical Bulletin, Performance of the Basic FetalCardiac Ultrasound Examination). The scan wasobtained across the fetal thorax. The ventriclesand atria are well formed and two atrioventricular(AV) valves are present. The moderator band isone of the trabeculae carneae that carries part ofthe right branch of the AV bundle. LA, Left atrium;LV, left ventricle; RA, right atrium; RV, rightventricle. (Courtesy of Dr. Wesley Lee, Division ofFetal Imaging, William Beaumont Hospital, RoyalOak, Michigan.)Left ventricleVertebralcolumnRight ventricleApex of heartModerator bandLeft atrium Right atriumInteratrial septumPulmonary veinMitral valve cuspsInterventricularseptumOval foramenABThe spiral orientation of the bulbar and truncal ridges,caused in part by streaming of blood from the ventricles,results in the formation of a spiral aorticopulmonaryseptum when the ridges fuse (Fig. 13-21D to G).This septum divides the bulbus cordis and TAinto two arterial channels, the ascending aorta andpulmonary trunk. Because of the spiraling of the aortico-pulmonary septum, the pulmonary trunk twists aroundthe ascending aorta (Fig. 13-21H). The bulbus cordis isincorporated into the walls of the definitive ventricles(see Fig. 13-18A and B):● In the right ventricle, the bulbus cordis is representedby the conus arteriosus (infundibulum), which givesorigin to the pulmonary trunk.● In the left ventricle, the bulbus cordis forms the wallsof the aortic vestibule, the part of the ventricular cavityjust inferior to the aortic valve.
  23. 23. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 311F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 1 Partitioning of the bulbus cordis and truncus arteriosus. A, Ventral aspect of heart at 5 weeks. The brokenlines and arrows indicate the levels of the sections shown in A. B, Transverse sections of the truncus arteriosus and bulbus cordis,illustrating the truncal and bulbar ridges. C, The ventral wall of the heart and truncus arteriosus has been removed to demonstratethese ridges. D, Ventral aspect of heart after partitioning of the truncus arteriosus. The broken lines and arrows indicate the levels ofthe sections shown in E. E, Sections through the newly formed aorta (A) and pulmonary trunk (PT), showing the aorticopulmonaryseptum. F, 6 weeks. The ventral wall of the heart and pulmonary trunk have been removed to show the aorticopulmonary septum.G, Diagram illustrating the spiral form of the aorticopulmonary septum. H, Drawing showing the great arteries (ascending aorta andpulmonary trunk) twisting around each other as they leave the heart.3A B CDG HPharyngeal archarteriesTruncus arteriosusBulbus cordisVentricle11AortaAscending aortaAorticopulmonary septumAortaPulmonary trunkPulmonary trunkLeft pulmonary arteryAorticopulmonary septumTruncal ridgeBulbar ridgesLeft atrioventricular canal23Aorta (A)Pulmonary trunk (PT)23rd4th6thAorticopulmonary septumRightatrioventricularcanalInterventricular septumE123PTPTAAA PT312F
  24. 24. 312 THE DEVELOPING HUMANConducting System of HeartInitially, the muscle in the primordial atrium and ventricleis continuous. The atrium acts as the interim pacemakerof the heart, but the sinus venosus soon takes over thisfunction. The sinuatrial (SA) node develops during thefifth week. It is originally in the right wall of the sinusvenosus, but it becomes incorporated into the wall of theright atrium with the sinus venosus (Fig. 13-19A and D).The SA node is located high in the right atrium, near theentrance of the superior vena cava (SVC).Development of Cardiac ValvesWhen partitioning of the truncus arteriosus (TA) is nearlycompleted (Fig. 13-21A to C), the semilunar valves beginto develop from three swellings of subendocardial tissuearound the orifices of the aorta and pulmonary trunk.These swellings are hollowed out and reshaped to formthree thin-walled cusps (Figs. 13-19C and D and 13-22).The atrioventricular (AV) valves (tricuspid and mitralvalves) develop similarly from localized proliferations oftissue around the AV canals.F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 2 Development of the semilunar valves of the aorta and pulmonary trunk. A, Sketch of a section of the truncusarteriosus and bulbus cordis showing the valve swellings. B, Transverse section of the bulbus cordis. C, Similar section after fusion ofthe bulbar ridges. D, Formation of the walls and valves of the aorta and pulmonary trunk. E, Rotation of the vessels has establishedthe adult relations of the valves. F and G, Longitudinal sections of the aorticoventricular junction illustrating successive stages in thehollowing (arrows) and thinning of the valve swellings to form the valve cusps.ARPLRLTruncusarteriosusTruncal ridgesMyocardiumBulbuscordisBulbar ridgesDorsal (posterior) cuspPosterolateral cuspsAnterolateralcuspsAnterior cuspEndocardiumPosterior cuspAortaPulmonary trunkVentral (anterior) cuspVentral valveswellingValve swellingRight bulbar ridgeDorsal valve swelling AortaPulmonarytrunkLeft bulbar ridgeFusedbulbarridgesLevel ofsection BAortaValve cuspEndocardiumLeft ventricleAD EB CF G
  25. 25. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 313After incorporation of the sinus venosus, cells from itsleft wall are found in the base of the interatrial septumjust anterior to the opening of the coronary sinus. Togetherwith cells from the AV region, they form the AV node andbundle, which are located just superior to the endocardialcushions. The fibers arising from the AV bundle pass fromthe atrium into the ventricle and split into right and leftbundle branches. These branches are distributed through-out the ventricular myocardium (Fig. 13-19D).The SA node, AV node, and AV bundle are richly sup-plied by nerves; however, the conducting system is welldeveloped before these nerves enter the heart. This spe-cialized tissue is normally the only signal pathway fromthe atria to the ventricles. As the four chambers of theheart develop, a band of connective tissue grows in fromthe epicardium, subsequently separating the muscle of theatria from that of the ventricles. This connective tissueforms part of the cardiac skeleton (fibrous skeletonof heart).SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROMEConducting tissue abnormalities have been observed inthe hearts of several infants who died unexpectedly froma disorder known as sudden infant death syndrome(SIDS). This is the most common cause of deaths amonghealthy infants (0.6 per 1000 live births).Most likely, no single mechanism is responsiblefor the sudden and unexpected deaths of these appar-ently healthy infants. Some people suggest that theyhave a defect in the autonomic nervous system. Abrainstem developmental abnormality or maturationaldelay related to neuroregulation of cardiorespiratorycontrol appears to be the most compelling hypothesis.BIRTH DEFECTS OF THE HEARTAND GREAT VESSELSCongenital heart defects (CHDs) are common, with afrequency of six to eight cases per 1000 births. SomeCHDs are caused by single-gene or chromosomal mecha-nisms. Other defects result from exposure to teratogenssuch as the rubella virus (see Chapter 20); however,in many cases, the cause is unknown. Most CHDs arethought to be caused by multiple factors, genetic andenvironmental (i.e., multifactorial inheritance), each ofwhich has a minor effect.The molecular aspects of abnormal cardiac develop-ment are poorly understood, and gene therapy for infantswith CHDs is at present a remote prospect. Imagingtechnology, such as real-time two-dimensional echocar-diography, permits detection of fetal CHDs as early asthe 17th or 18th week.Most CHDs are well tolerated during fetal life;however, at birth, when the fetus loses contact with thematernal circulation, the impact of CHDs becomes appar-ent. Some types of CHD cause very little disability; othersare incompatible with extrauterine life. Because of recentadvances in cardiovascular surgery, many types of CHDcan be palliated or corrected surgically, and fetal cardiacsurgery may soon be possible for complex CHDs.DEXTROCARDIAIf the embryonic heart tube bends to the left instead ofto the right (Fig. 13-23), the heart is displaced to the rightand the heart and its vessels are reversed left to right asin a mirror image of their normal configuration. Dextro-cardia is the most frequent positional defect of theheart. In dextrocardia with situs inversus (transpositionof abdominal viscera), the incidence of accompanyingcardiac defects is low. If there is no other associatedvascular abnormality, these hearts function normally.In isolated dextrocardia, the abnormal position ofthe heart is not accompanied by displacement of otherviscera. This defect is usually complicated by severecardiac anomalies (e.g., single ventricle and transpositionof the great vessels). The TGF-β factor Nodal is involvedin looping of the heart tube, but its role in dextrocardiais unclear.ECTOPIA CORDISIn ectopia cordis, a rare condition, the heart is in anabnormal location (Fig. 13-24). In the thoracic form ofectopia cordis, the heart is partly or completely exposedon the surface of the thorax. It is usually associated withwidely separated halves of the sternum (nonfusion) andan open pericardial sac. Death occurs in most cases duringthe first few days after birth, usually from infection, cardiacfailure, or hypoxemia. If there are not severe cardiacdefects, surgical therapy usually consists of covering theheart with skin. In some cases of ectopia cordis, theheart protrudes through the diaphragm into the abdomen.The clinical outcome for patients with ectopia cordishas improved and many children have survived to adult-hood. The most common thoracic form of ectopia cordisresults from faulty development of the sternum and peri-cardium because of failure of complete fusion of thelateral folds in the formation of the thoracic wall duringthe fourth week (see Chapter 5, Fig. 5-1).Text continued on p. 324
  26. 26. 314 THE DEVELOPING HUMANATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECTSAn atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common congenital heartdefect and occurs more frequently in females than in males.The most common form of ASD is patent oval foramen(Fig. 13-25B).A probe patent oval foramen is present in up to 25%of people (Fig. 13-25B). In this circumstance, a probe canbe passed from one atrium to the other through the supe-rior part of the floor of the oval fossa. This defect is notclinically significant, but a probe patent oval foramen maybe forced open because of other cardiac defects and con-tribute to the functional pathology of the heart. Probepatent oval foramen results from incomplete adhesionbetween the flap-like valve of the oval foramen and theseptum secundum after birth.There are four clinically significant types of ASD (Figs.13-26 and 13-27): ostium secundum defect, endocardialcushion defect with ostium primum defect, sinus venosusdefect, and common atrium. The first two types of ASD arerelatively common.Ostium secundum ASDs (Figs. 13-26A to D and 13-27)are in the area of the oval fossa and include defects of theseptum primum and septum secundum. Ostium secundumASDs are well tolerated during childhood; symptoms suchas pulmonary hypertension usually appear in the 30s orlater. Closure of the ASD is carried out at open heartsurgery, and the mortality rate is less than 1%. The defectsmay be multiple and, in symptomatic older children, defectsof 2 cm or more in diameter are not unusual. Females withASD outnumber males 3:1. Ostium secundum ASDs are oneof the most common types of CHD, yet are the least severe.The patent oval foramen usually results from abnormalresorption of the septum primum during the formation ofthe foramen secundum. If resorption occurs in abnormallocations, the septum primum is fenestrated or net-like (Fig.13-26A). If excessive resorption of the septum primumoccurs, the resulting short septum primum will not close theoval foramen (Fig. 13-26B). If an abnormally large ovalforamen occurs because of defective development of theseptum secundum, a normal septum primum will not closethe abnormal oval foramen at birth (Fig. 13-26C). A smallisolated patent oval foramen is of no hemodynamic signifi-cance; however, if there are other defects (e.g., pulmonarystenosis or atresia), blood is shunted through the ovalforamen into the left atrium and produces cyanosis (defi-cient oxygenation of blood). Large ostium secundum ASDsmay also occur because of a combination of excessiveresorption of the septum primum and a large oval foramen(Figs. 13-26D and 13-27).Endocardial cushion defects with ostium primumASDs are less common forms of ASD (Fig. 13-26E). Severalcardiac defects are grouped together under this headingbecause they result from the same developmental defect,a deficiency of the endocardial cushions and the AV septum.The septum primum does not fuse with the endocardialcushions; as a result, there is a patent foramen primum-ostium primum defect. Usually there is also a cleft in theanterior cusp of the mitral valve. In the less common com-plete type of endocardial cushion and AV septal defects,fusion of the endocardial cushions fails to occur. As a result,there is a large defect in the center of the heart known asan AV septal defect (Fig. 13-28). This type of ASD occursin approximately 20% of persons with Down syndrome;otherwise, it is a relatively uncommon cardiac defect. Itconsists of a continuous interatrial and interventriculardefect with markedly abnormal AV valves.All sinus venosus ASDs (high ASDs) are located in thesuperior part of the interatrial septum close to the entry ofthe SVC (Fig. 13-26F). A sinus venosus defect is a rare typeof ASD. It results from incomplete absorption of the sinusvenosus into the right atrium and/or abnormal develop-ment of the septum secundum. This type of ASD is com-monly associated with partial anomalous pulmonary venousconnections.Common atrium is a rare cardiac defect in which theinteratrial septum is absent. This defect is the result offailure of the septum primum and septum secundum todevelop (combination of ostium secundum, ostium primum,and sinus venosus defects).
  27. 27. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 315F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 3 The embryonic heart tube during thefourth week. A, Normal looping of the tubular heart to the right.B, Abnormal looping of the tubular heart to the left.Truncus arteriosusBulbus cordisVentricleAtriumSinus venosusTruncus arteriosusBulbus cordisVentricleAtriumSinus venosusNORMALDEXTROCARDIAABF I G U R E 1 3 – 2 4 Neonate with ectopia cordis, cleftsternum, and bilateral cleft lip. Death occurred in the first days oflife from infection, cardiac failure, and hypoxia.F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 5 A, Normal postnatal appearance of the right side of the interatrial septum after adhesion of the septumprimum to the septum secundum. A1, Sketch of a section of the interatrial septum illustrating formation of the oval fossa in the rightatrium. Note that the floor of the oval fossa is formed by the septum primum. B and B1, Similar views of a probe patent oval foramenresulting from incomplete adhesion of the septum primum to the septum secundum. Some well-oxygenated blood can enter the rightatrium via a patent oval foramen; however, if the opening is small it usually of no hemodynamic significance.Oval fossaSuperior vena cavaWall of right ventricleBorder of oval fossaOval fossaOrifice of coronary sinusSeptum primumInferior vena cavaLeft atriumProbe patentoval foramenSeptum secundumA BA1 B1
  28. 28. 316 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 2 6 Drawings of the right aspect of the interatrial septum. The adjacent sketches of sections of the septa illustratevarious types of atrial septal defect (ASD). A, Patent oval foramen resulting from resorption of the septum primum in abnormal loca-tions. B, Patent oval foramen caused by excessive resorption of the septum primum (short flap defect). C, Patent oval foramen resultingfrom an abnormally large oval foramen. D, Patent oval foramen resulting from an abnormally large oval foramen and excessive resorp-tion of the septum primum. E, Endocardial cushion defect with primum-type ASD. The adjacent section shows the cleft in the anteriorcusp of the mitral valve. F, Sinus venosus ASD. The high septal defect resulted from abnormal absorption of the sinus venosus intothe right atrium. In E and F, note that the oval fossa has formed normally.A BC DE FInferiorvena cavaPerforations in septum primum,the valve of the oval foramenLarge oval foramen (ASD)Normal septum primumNormal oval fossaCleft in mitral valveNormal oval fossaHigh atrial septal defect (ASD)Patent foramen primum (ASD)Superior vena cavaRight atriumOpening ofcoronary sinusTricuspid valveRight atriumNormal oval foramenShort septum primumPapillary musclesAbnormally large ovalforamen (large ASD)Very shortseptum primumRA LA
  29. 29. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 317F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 7 Dissection of an adult heart with a large patent oval foramen. The arrow passes through a large atrial septaldefect (ASD), which resulted from an abnormally large oval foramen and excessive resorption of the septum primum. This is referredto as a secundum-type ASD and is one of the most common types of congenital heart disease.Left atriumLeft ventriclePatent ovalforamen(ASD)InteratrialseptumMitral valveInterior ofleft ventricleF I G U R E 1 3 – 2 8 A, An infant’s heart, sectioned and viewed from the right side, showing a patent oval foramen and an atrio-ventricular septal defect. B, Schematic drawing of a heart illustrating various septal defects. ASD, atrial septal defect; VSD, and ven-tricular septal defect. (A, From Lev M: Autopsy Diagnosis of Congenitally Malformed Hearts. Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas, 1953.)BAAtrioventricular canalASDVSDWall of left ventricleMuscular part ofinterventricular septumRight atriumAtrioventricularseptal defectPatentoval foramen
  30. 30. 318 THE DEVELOPING HUMANVENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECTSVentricular septal defects (VSDs) are the most common typeof CHD, accounting for approximately 25% of heart defects.VSDs occur more frequently in males than in females. VSDsmay occur in any part of the IV septum (Fig. 13-28B), butmembranous VSD is the most common type (Figs. 13-28Band 13-29A). Frequently, during the first year, 30% to 50%of small VSDs close spontaneously.Incomplete closure of the IV foramen results fromfailure of the membranous part of the IV septum to develop.It results from failure of an extension of subendocardialtissue to grow from the right side of the endocardial cushionand fuse with the aorticopulmonary septum and the mus-cular part of the IV septum (Fig. 13-18C to E). Large VSDswith excessive pulmonary blood flow (Fig. 13-30) and pul-monary hypertension result in dyspnea (difficult breathing)and cardiac failure early in infancy.Muscular VSD is a less common type of defect and mayappear anywhere in the muscular part of the interventricularseptum. Sometimes there are multiple small defects, pro-ducing what is sometimes called the “Swiss cheese” VSD.Muscular VSDs probably occur because of excessive cavi-tation of myocardial tissue during formation of the ventri-cular walls and the muscular part of the interventricularseptum.Absence of the IV septum—single ventricle or commonventricle—resulting from failure of the IV septum to form,is extremely rare and results in a three-chambered heart(Latin cor triloculare biatriatum). When there is a singleventricle, the atria empty through a single common valveor two separate AV valves into a single ventricular chamber.The aorta and pulmonary trunk arise from the ventricle.TGA (transposition of great arteries) (see Fig. 13-32) and arudimentary outlet chamber are present in most infants witha single ventricle. Some children die during infancy fromcongestive heart failure.F I G U R E 1 3 – 2 9 A, Ultrasound image of the heart of a second-trimester fetus with an atrioventricular (AV) canal (atrioventricularseptal) defect. An atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect are also present. Ao, aorta. B, Orientation drawing. (A, Courtesy ofDr. B. Benacerraf, Diagnostic Ultrasound Associates, P.C., Boston, Massachusetts.)Plane ofultrasound scanInterventricularseptumLeft lungVertebraBA
  31. 31. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 319TRANSPOSITION OF THE GREAT ARTERIESTransposition of the great arteries (TGA) is the commoncause of cyanotic heart disease in newborn infants (Fig.13-32). TGA is often associated with other cardiac anoma-lies (e.g., ASD and VSD). In typical cases, the aorta liesanterior and to the right of the pulmonary trunk and arisesfrom the morphologic right ventricle, whereas the pulmo-nary trunk arises from the morphologic left ventricle. Theassociated ASD and VSD defects permit some interchangebetween the pulmonary and systemic circulations.Because of these anatomic defects, deoxygenatedsystemic venous blood returning to the right atrium entersthe right ventricle and then passes to the body throughthe aorta. Oxygenated pulmonary venous blood passesthrough the left ventricle back into the pulmonary circula-tion. Because of the patent oval foramen, there is somemixing of the blood. Without surgical correction of theTGA, these infants usually die within a few months.Many attempts have been made to explain the basis ofTGA, but the conal growth hypothesis is favored by mostinvestigators. According to this explanation, the aorticopul-monary septum fails to pursue a spiral course duringpartitioning of the bulbus cordis and TA. This defect isthought to result from failure of the conus arteriosus todevelop normally during incorporation of the bulbus cordisinto the ventricles. Defective migration of neural crest cellsis involved.F I G U R E 1 3 – 3 0 Ultrasound scan of a fetal heart at 23.4weeks with an atrioventricular septal defect and a large ventricularseptal defect (VSD). (A, Courtesy of Dr. Wesley Lee, Division ofFetal Imaging, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan.)Interventricular septumVSDRight atriumABVertebralcolumnPERSISTENT TRUNCUS ARTERIOSUSPersistent truncus arteriosus (TA) results from failure ofthe truncal ridges and aorticopulmonary septum todevelop normally and divide the TA into the aorta andpulmonary trunk (Fig. 13-31). A single arterial trunk, theTA, arises from the heart and supplies the systemic,pulmonary, and coronary circulations. A VSD is alwayspresent with a TA defect; the TA straddles the VSD(Fig. 13-31B).Recent studies indicate that developmental arrest ofthe outflow tract, semilunar valves, and aortic sac in theearly embryo (days 31-32) is involved in the pathogenesisof TA defects. The common type of TA is a single arterialvessel that branches to form the pulmonary trunk andascending aorta (Fig. 13-31A and B). In the next mostcommon type, the right and left pulmonary arteries ariseclose together from the dorsal wall of the TA (Fig.13-31C). Less common types are illustrated in Figure13-31D and E.AORTICOPULMONARYSEPTAL DEFECTAorticopulmonary septal defect is a rare condition inwhich there is an opening (aortic window) between theaorta and pulmonary trunk near the aortic valve. Theaorticopulmonary defect results from localized defect inthe formation of the aorticopulmonary septum. The pres-ence of pulmonary and aortic valves and an intact IVseptum distinguishes this anomaly from the persistenttruncus arteriosus defect.
  32. 32. 320 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 1 Illustrations of the common types of persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA). A, The common trunk divides intothe aorta and a short pulmonary trunk. B, Coronal section of the heart shown in A. Observe the circulation of blood in this heart (arrows)and the ventricular septal defect. C, The right and left pulmonary arteries arise close together from the truncus arteriosus. D, Thepulmonary arteries arise independently from the sides of the truncus arteriosus. E, No pulmonary arteries are present; the lungs aresupplied by the bronchial arteries. LA, left atrium; RA, right atrium.Arch of aortaLarge right ventriclePersistent truncus arteriosus(PTA)Ventricular septal defectLeft pulmonary arteryShort pulmonarytrunkAC D EBR.A.L.A.F I G U R E 1 3 – 3 2 Drawing of a heart illustratingtransposition of the great arteries (TGA). The ventricularand atrial septal defects allow mixing of the arterial andvenous blood. This birth defect is often associated withother cardiac defects as shown (ventricular septal defect[VSD] and atrial septal defect [ASD]).Right atrium AortaPatent ductus arteriosusPulmonarytrunkASDVSDLeft ventricle
  33. 33. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 321F I G U R E 1 3 – 3 3 A, Drawing of an infant’s heart showing a small pulmonary trunk (pulmonary stenosis) and a large aorta result-ing from unequal partitioning of the truncus arteriosus. There is also hypertrophy of the right ventricle and a patent ductus arteriosus(PDA). B, Frontal section of this heart illustrating the tetralogy of Fallot. Observe the four cardiac defects of this tetralogy: pulmonaryvalve stenosis, ventricular septal defect (VSD), overriding aorta, and hypertrophy of the right ventricle.Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA)Small pulmonarytrunk (pulmonarystenosis)Infundibular stenosisPDAPulmonaryvalvestenosisOverriding aortaVSDHypertrophy ofright ventricleA BUNEQUAL DIVISION OF THETRUNCUS ARTERIOSUSUnequal division of the TA (Figs. 13-33A and 13-34B andC) results when partitioning of the TA superior to thevalves is unequal. One of the great arteries is large andthe other is small. As a result, the aorticopulmonaryseptum is not aligned with the IV septum and a VSDresults; of the two vessels, the one with the larger dia-meter usually straddles the VSD (Fig. 13-33B).In pulmonary valve stenosis, the cusps of the pulmo-nary valve are fused to form a dome with a narrow centralopening (Fig. 13-34D).In infundibular stenosis, the conus arteriosus (infun-dibulum) of the right ventricle is underdeveloped. Thetwo types of pulmonary stenosis may occur. Dependingon the degree of obstruction to blood flow, there is avariable degree of hypertrophy of the right ventricle (Fig.13-33A and B).TETRALOGY OF FALLOTThis classic group of four cardiac defects (Figs. 13-33B,13-35, and 13-36) consists of:● Pulmonary artery stenosis (obstruction of right ven-tricular outflow)● VSD (ventricular septal defect)● Dextroposition of aorta (overriding or straddling aorta)● Right ventricular hypertrophyThe pulmonary trunk is usually small (Fig. 13-33A) andthere may be various degrees of pulmonary artery ste-nosis. Cyanosis (deficient oxygenation of blood), is anobvious sign of the tetralogy, but it is not usually presentat birth.The tetralogy results when division of the TA is unequaland the pulmonary trunk is stenotic. Pulmonary atresiawith VSD is an extreme form of tetralogy of Fallot; theentire right ventricular output is through the aorta. Pul-monary blood flow is dependent on a PDA (patent ductusarteriosus) or on bronchial collateral vessels. Initial treat-ment may require surgical placement of a temporaryshunt, but in many cases, primary surgical repair is thetreatment of choice in early infancy.
  34. 34. 322 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 4 Abnormal division of the truncus arteriosus (TA). A to C, Sketches of transverse sections of the TA illustratingnormal and abnormal partitioning of the TA. A, Normal. B, Unequal partitioning of the TA resulting in a small pulmonary trunk.C, Unequal partitioning resulting in a small aorta. D, Sketches illustrating a normal semilunar valve and stenotic pulmonary and aorticvalves.Truncal ridge Aorticopulmonary septumAortaPulmonary trunkStenoticpulmonary trunkLargepulmonary trunkStenotic aortaNormal semilunar valve Pulmonary valve stenosis Aortic valve stenosisFused valve cusps Fused valve cuspsLarge aortaABCD
  35. 35. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 323F I G U R E 1 3 – 3 5 A, Ultrasound image of the heart of a 20-week fetus with tetralogy of Fallot. Note that the large overridingaorta (AO) straddles the interventricular septum. As a result, it receives blood from the left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles. IVS, Interven-tricular septum; LA, left atrium. B, Orientation drawing. (A, Courtesy of Dr. B. Benacerraf, Diagnostic Ultrasound Associates, P.C., Boston,Massachusetts.)Plane ofultrasound scanABF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 6 Tetralogy of Fallot. Fine barium powder was injected into the heart. Note the two ventricles (V), interventricularseptum (I), interventricular septal defect at the superior margin, and origin of the aorta above the right ventricle (overriding aorta). Themain pulmonary artery is not visualized. (Courtesy of Dr. Joseph R. Siebert, Children’s Hospital & Regional Medical Center, Seattle,Washington.)
  36. 36. 324 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 7 A, Ultrasound image of the heart of a second-trimester fetus with a hypoplastic left heart. Note that the leftventricle (LV) is much smaller than the right ventricle (RV). This is an oblique scan of the fetal thorax through the long axis of the ven-tricles. B, Orientation drawing. (A, Courtesy of Dr. B. Benacerraf, Diagnostic Ultrasound Associates, P.C., Boston, Massachusetts.)BACentrum ofvertebral bodyInterventricularseptumPlane ofultrasound scanAORTIC STENOSIS ANDAORTIC ATRESIAIn aortic valve stenosis, the edges of the valve areusually fused to form a dome with a narrow opening (Fig.13-34D). This defect may be congenital or develop afterbirth. The valvular stenosis causes extra work for the heartand results in hypertrophy of the left ventricle and abnor-mal heart sounds (heart murmurs).In subaortic stenosis, there is often a band of fibroustissue just inferior to the aortic valve. The narrowing ofthe aorta results from persistence of tissue that normallydegenerates as the valve forms.Aortic atresia is present when obstruction of the aortaor its valve is complete.HYPOPLASTIC LEFTHEART SYNDROMEThe left ventricle is small and nonfunctional (Fig. 13-37);the right ventricle maintains both pulmonary and sys-temic circulations. The blood passes through an atrialseptal defect or a dilated oval foramen from the left tothe right side of the heart, where it mixes with the sys-temic venous blood.In addition to the underdeveloped left ventricle, thereare atresia of the aortic or mitral orifice and hypoplasiaof the ascending aorta. Infants with this severe defectusually die during the first few weeks after birth. Distur-bances in the migration of neural crest cells, in hemody-namic function, in apoptosis, and in the proliferation ofthe extracellular matrix are likely responsible for thepathogenesis of many CHDs such as this syndrome.DERIVATIVES OF PHARYNGEALARCH ARTERIESAs the pharyngeal arches develop during the fourthweek, they are supplied by arteries—the pharyngealarch arteries—from the aortic sac (Fig. 13-38B). Meso-dermal cells migrate from the pharyngeal arches tothe aortic sac, connecting the pharyngeal arch arteries tothe outflow tract. These arteries terminate in the dorsalaorta of the ipsilateral side. Although six pairs of pha-ryngeal arch arteries usually develop, they are not allpresent at the same time. By the time the sixth pair ofpharyngeal arch arteries has formed, the first twopairs have disappeared (Fig. 13-38C). During the eighthweek, the primordial pharyngeal arch arterial pattern istransformed into the final fetal arterial arrangement(Fig. 13-39C).Molecular studies indicate that the transcription factorTbx1 regulates migration of the neural crest cells whichcontribute to the formation of the pharyngeal archarteries.Derivatives of First Pair ofPharyngeal Arch ArteriesMost of these pharyngeal arch arteries disappear, butremnants of them form part of the maxillary arteries,which supply the ears, teeth, and muscles of the eye andface. These arteries may also contribute to the formationof the external carotid arteries.Derivatives of Second Pair ofPharyngeal Arch ArteriesDorsal parts of these arteries persist and form the stemsof the stapedial arteries; these small vessels run throughthe ring of the stapes, a small bone in the middle ear.
  37. 37. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 325F I G U R E 1 3 – 3 8 Pharyngeal arches and pharyngealarch arteries. A, Left side of an embryo (approximately 26days). B, Schematic drawing of this embryo showing the leftpharyngeal arch arteries arising from the aortic sac, runningthrough the pharyngeal arches, and terminating in the leftdorsal aorta. C, An embryo (approximately 37 days) showingthe single dorsal aorta and that most of the first two pairs ofpharyngeal arch arteries have degenerated.1stPharyngealarches 2nd3rdUmbilical cordUmbilical vesiclePharyngeal arch arteries (1st to 3rd)Aortic sacHeartLeft dorsal aortaVitelline arteryLeft umbilical arteryUmbilical veinVitelline vessels on umbilical vesicle3rd, 4th, and 6th pharyngeal arch arteriesSpinal cordDorsal aortaPulmonary arteryOmphaloenteric ductUmbilical vesicleMidbrainA BCDerivatives of Third Pair ofPharyngeal Arch ArteriesProximal parts of these arteries form the common carotidarteries, which supply structures in the head (Fig.13-39D). Distal parts of the third pair of pharyngeal archarteries join with the dorsal aortae to form the internalcarotid arteries, which supply the middle ears, orbits,brain and its meninges, and the pituitary gland.Derivatives of Fourth Pair ofPharyngeal Arch ArteriesThe left fourth pharyngeal arch artery forms part of thearch of the aorta (Fig. 13-39C). The proximal part of theartery develops from the aortic sac and the distal part isderived from the left dorsal aorta.The right fourth pharyngeal arch artery becomes theproximal part of the right subclavian artery. The distalpart of the right subclavian artery forms from the rightdorsal aorta and right seventh intersegmental artery. Theleft subclavian artery is not derived from a pharyngealarch artery; it forms from the left seventh intersegmentalartery (Fig. 13-39A). As development proceeds, differen-tial growth shifts the origin of the left subclavian arterycranially. Consequently, it lies close to the origin of theleft common carotid artery (Fig. 13-39D).Fate of Fifth Pair of PharyngealArch ArteriesApproximately 50% of the time, the fifth pair of pharyn-geal arch arteries consists of rudimentary vessels thatsoon degenerate, leaving no vascular derivatives. In theother 50%, these arteries do not develop.
  38. 38. 326 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 3 9 Schematic drawings illustrating the arterial changes that result during transformation of the truncus arteriosus,aortic sac, pharyngeal arch arteries, and dorsal aortae into the adult arterial pattern. The vessels that are not colored are not derivedfrom these structures. A, Pharyngeal arch arteries at 6 weeks; by this stage, the first two pairs of arteries have largely disappeared.B, Pharyngeal arch arteries at 7 weeks; the parts of the dorsal aortae and pharyngeal arch arteries that normally disappear are indicatedwith broken lines. C, Arterial arrangement at 8 weeks. D, Sketch of the arterial vessels of a 6-month-old infant. Note that the ascendingaorta and pulmonary arteries are considerably smaller in C than in D. This represents the relative flow through these vessels at thedifferent stages of development. Observe the large size of the ductus arteriosus (DA) in C and that it is essentially a direct continuationof the pulmonary trunk. The DA normally becomes functionally closed within the first few days after birth. Eventually the DA becomesthe ligamentum arteriosum, as shown in D.Left dorsal aortaPharyngeal arch arteriesLeft subclavian arteryLeft subclavian arteryArch of aortaLigamentum arteriosum7th intersegmental arteryInternal carotid arteriesAscendingaortaPulmonary arterial trunkBrachiocephalic arterySubclavian arteriesRight pulmonary arteryDuctus arteriosusDescending aortaAscending aortaExternal carotid arteriesLeft common carotid arteryTruncus arteriosus (TA)(partly divided intoaortic and pulmonaryarteries)External carotid arteryLeft dorsal aortaInternal carotid arteryAortic sacDuctus arteriosus (DA)Left dorsal aortaPulmonary arteriesLeft pulmonary arteryTruncus arteriosus Aortic sacAortic sacDorsal aortasACBD3456345 63rd pharyngeal arch arteryRight subclavian arteryLeft pulmonaryartery4th pharyngeal arch artery 6th pharyngeal arch artery
  39. 39. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 327Derivatives of Sixth Pair ofPharyngeal Arch ArteriesThe left sixth pharyngeal arch artery develops as follows(Fig. 13-39B and C):● The proximal part of the artery persists as the proxi-mal part of the left pulmonary artery.● The distal part of the artery passes from the left pul-monary artery to the dorsal aorta and forms a prenatalshunt, the ductus arteriosus (DA).The right sixth pharyngeal arch artery develops asfollows:● The proximal part of the artery persists as the proxi-mal part of the right pulmonary artery.● The distal part of the artery degenerates.The transformation of the sixth pair of pharyngealarch arteries explains why the course of the recurrentlaryngeal nerves differs on the two sides. These nervessupply the sixth pair of pharyngeal arches and hookaround the sixth pair of pharyngeal arch arteries onCOARCTATION OF AORTAAortic coarctation (constriction) occurs in approximately10% of children with congenital heart defects (CHDs).Coarctation is characterized by an aortic constriction ofvarying length (Fig. 13-41). Most coarctations occur distalto the origin of the left subclavian artery at the entrance ofthe ductus arteriosis (DA) (juxtaductal coarctation).The classification into preductal and postductal coarcta-tions is commonly used; however, in 90% of instances, thecoarctation is directly opposite the DA. Coarctation of theaorta occurs twice as often in males as in females and isassociated with a bicuspid aortic valve in 70% of cases.In postductal coarctation (Fig. 13-41A and B), the con-striction is just distal to the DA. This permits developmentof a collateral circulation during the fetal period (Fig.13-41B), thereby assisting with passage of blood to inferiorparts of the body.In preductal coarctation (Fig. 13-41C), the constrictionis proximal to the DA. The narrowed segment may be exten-sive (Fig. 13-41D); before birth, blood flows through the DAto the descending aorta for distribution to the lower body.In an infant with severe aortic coarctation, closure of theDA results in hypoperfusion and rapid deterioration of theinfant. These babies usually receive prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)in an attempt to reopen the DA and establish an adequateblood flow to the lower limbs. Aortic coarctation may be afeature of Turner syndrome (see Chapter 20). This and otherobservations suggest that genetic and/or environmentalfactors cause coarctation.There are three main views about the embryologic basisof coarctation of the aorta:● During formation of the arch of the aorta, muscle tissueof the DA may be incorporated into the wall of the aorta;then, when the DA constricts at birth, the ductal musclein the aorta also constricts, forming a coarctation.● There may be abnormal involution of a small segment ofthe left dorsal aorta (Fig. 13-41F). Later, this stenoticsegment (area of coarctation) moves cranially with theleft subclavian artery (Fig. 13-41G).● During fetal life, the segment of the arch of the aortabetween the left subclavian artery and the DA is normallynarrow because it carries very little blood. After closureof the DA, this narrow area (isthmus) normally enlargesuntil it is the same diameter as the aorta. If the isthmuspersists, a coarctation forms.their way to the developing larynx (Fig. 13-40A). Onthe right, because the distal part of the right sixth arterydegenerates, the right recurrent laryngeal nerve movessuperiorly and hooks around the proximal part of theright subclavian artery, the derivative of the fourth pha-ryngeal arch artery (Fig. 13-40B). On the left, the leftrecurrent laryngeal nerve hooks around the ductus arteri-ous (DA) formed by the distal part of the sixth pha-ryngeal arch artery. When this arterial shunt involutesafter birth, the nerve remains around the ligamentumarteriosum (remnant of DA), and the arch of the aorta(Fig. 13-40C).Pharyngeal Arch Arterial Birth DefectsBecause of the many changes involved in transformationof the embryonic pharyngeal arch arterial system into theadult arterial pattern, arterial birth defects may occur.Most defects result from the persistence of parts of thepharyngeal arch arteries that usually disappear, or fromdisappearance of parts that normally persist.DOUBLE PHARYNGEAL ARCH ARTERYThis rare anomaly is characterized by a vascular ring aroundthe trachea and esophagus (Fig. 13-42B). Varying degreesof compression of these structures may occur in infants. Ifthe compression is significant, it causes wheezing respira-tions that are aggravated by crying, feeding, and flexion ofthe neck. The vascular ring results from failure of the distalpart of the right dorsal aorta to disappear (Fig. 13-42A); asa result, right and left arches form. Usually the right arch ofthe aorta is larger and passes posterior to the trachea andesophagus (Fig. 13-42B).Text continued on p. 333
  40. 40. 328 THE DEVELOPING HUMANF I G U R E 1 3 – 4 0 The relation of the recurrent laryngealnerves to the pharyngeal arch arteries. A, At 6 weeks, showing therecurrent laryngeal nerves hooked around the sixth pair of pharyn-geal arch arteries. B, At 8 weeks, showing the right recurrent laryn-geal nerve hooked around the right subclavian artery, and the leftrecurrent laryngeal nerve hooked around the ductus arteriosus andthe arch of the aorta. C, After birth, showing the left recurrent nervehooked around the ligamentum arteriosum and the arch of theaorta.4th5thForegutDorsal aortaLeft commoncarotid arteryEsophagusTracheaEsophagusLeft recurrentlaryngeal nerveLeft recurrentlaryngeal nerveLeft vagus nerveLigamentumarteriosumLeft pulmonaryarteryDescending aortaRight recurrentlaryngeal nerveDuctus arteriosusRight vagusnerve Right vagusnerveRight and leftrecurrentlaryngealnervesRight recurrentlaryngeal nerveRightsubclavianarteryRight subclavian arteryExternalcarotid arteryDegenerated distalhalf of 6th pharyngealarch arteryPharyngealarch arteries6thLeft vagusnerveA BC
  41. 41. C H A P T E R 13 CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 329F I G U R E 1 3 – 4 1 A, Postductal coarctation of the aorta. B, Diagrammatic representation of the common routes of collateralcirculation that develop in association with postductal coarctation of the aorta. C and D, Preductal coarctation. E, Sketch of the pha-ryngeal arch arterial pattern in a 7-week embryo, showing the areas that normally involute (see dotted branches of arteries). Note thatthe distal segment of the right dorsal aorta normally involutes as the right subclavian artery develops. F, Abnormal involution of a smalldistal segment of the left dorsal aorta. G, Later stage showing the abnormally involuted segment appearing as a coarctation of theaorta. This moves to the region of the ductus arteriosus with the left subclavian artery. These drawings (E to G) illustrate one hypothesisabout the embryologic basis of coarctation of the aorta.Ductus arteriosus(DA)DuctusarteriosusDuctusarteriosusRightsubclavianarteryLeftsubclavianarteryRegion ofpartial involutionand coarctationLeft and rightdorsal aortasNormal areaof involutionAbnormal areaof involutionPostductal coarctationPreductalcoarctationPostductalcoarctationDADA DASubclavian arterySubscapulararteryIntercostal arteriesInferiorepigastric arteryExtensive preductal coarctationDescending aortaABCE F GD125634Left subclavianartery

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