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Pala jc presentation_2011

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Presentation by Ellysa Stern Cahoy on Transformational Literacies at the Pennsylvania Library Association - Juniata Conemaugh Chapter spring meeting/

Presentation by Ellysa Stern Cahoy on Transformational Literacies at the Pennsylvania Library Association - Juniata Conemaugh Chapter spring meeting/

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  • Notes from Chris Lemery.  keep in the research questions and focus it more to a public lib audience build space planning considerations that advance these literacies
  • The 2009 Horizon Report identified information literacy as a critical challenge for higher education, noting that there is a growing need for formal instruction in key new skills, including information literacy, visual literacy, and technological literacy. The role of librarians and information literacy in the content creation process is critical. How is the traditional definition of information literacy changing and meshing with other integral digital literacies?  Information literacy abilities and dispositions have become more complex as resources and technologies have changed.  Multiple literacies, including digital, visual, textual, and technology and media literacies, have meshed with information literacy as crucial skills for this century. (AASL, 2007) Information literacy is morphing from an individually-focused, competency based agenda to one that is socio-cultural, encompasses the entire learning community, and rests on collective intelligence. (Gibson, p. 14) Like other literacies, the vision of what constitutes information literacy has changed from a set of abilities that were library-centric and primarily cognitive-based to one that places an emphasis on learning through practice, ethical behavior, and collective, social intelligence.  The new set of K-12 information literacy standards from AASL, the American Association of School Librarians, reflects this change in vision, and I believe that the ACRL standards will soon be revised to integrate this new, more blended perspective as well.  In his presentation, Prisms Around Student Learning: Information Literacy, IT Fluency,and Media Literacy.  Craig Gibson structures information literacy as a prism, which overlays other critical literacies: The Information Literacy Prism Research Process Information Management Critical Thinking Format-independence Focus on ethics collective intelligence   IT Fluency Prism Flexible reasoning applied to technology use (“fluency”) Developmental stages Focus on ethics    Media Education Prism User-generated content, creativity New learning environments Social learning Authentic practice Focus on ethics Note focus on ethics throughout all three. 
  • Integrated literacies are a way of thinking, a dispositional habit, and a cultural practice (learning through practice). This convergence of literacies encompasses the skills inherent in each separate literacy, encompassing on overall vision that includes: * Internalized searching / evaluation skills * Deep technology fluency * Knowledge building * Reflection and self-assessment * Understanding of ethical use of information The idea of integrated literacies introduces new questions: How do we plan for “coordinated literacies”across the curriculum, or “integrated literacies”? What kinds of faculty development are necessary to promote an“integrated literacies”agenda? How can each stakeholder group (librarians, technology specialists and others) contribute to this agenda and yet retain a distinctive mission?
  • The emergence of social media and collaborative online communities requires a reframing of information literacy as a metaliteracy that supports multiple literacy types. Social media environments are transient, collaborative, and free-flowing, requiring a comprehensive understanding of information to critically evaluate, share, and produce content in multiple forms. Metaliteracy promotes critical thinking and collaboration in a digital age, providing a comprehensive framework to effectively participate in social media and online communities. Metaliteracy expands the scope of information literacy as more than a set of discrete skills, challenging us to rethink information literacy as active knowledge production and distribution in collaborative online communities. Producing and sharing information are significant activities for lifelong learning in social media environments and online communities. New skills for metaliteracies: Understanding privacy, information ethics, and intellectual property issues. Learning how to share information in a participatory environment
  • The emergence of social media and collaborative online communities requires a reframing of information literacy as a metaliteracy that supports multiple literacy types. Social media environments are transient, collaborative, and free-flowing, requiring a comprehensive understanding of information to critically evaluate, share, and produce content in multiple forms. Metaliteracy promotes critical thinking and collaboration in a digital age, providing a comprehensive framework to effectively participate in social media and online communities. Metaliteracy expands the scope of information literacy as more than a set of discrete skills, challenging us to rethink information literacy as active knowledge production and distribution in collaborative online communities. Producing and sharing information are significant activities for lifelong learning in social media environments and online communities. New skills for metaliteracies: Understanding privacy, information ethics, and intellectual property issues. Learning how to share information in a participatory environment
  • Thomas P. Mackey Sloan C 2009 Center for Distance Learning, Empire State College Understand format type and delivery mode Evaluate user feedback as an active researcher Create a context for user-generated information Evaluate dynamic content critically Determine the extent of information needed Access the needed information effectively and efficiently Evaluate information and its sources critically Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally
  • Tom Mackey and Trudi Jacobson redefine information literacy as a metaliteracy. They state that the
  • The challenge is due to the fact that despite the widespread agreement on its importance, training in digital literacy skills and techniques is rare in teacher education and school district professional development programs. As teachers begin to realize that they are limiting their students by not helping them to develop and use digital media literacy skills across the curriculum, the lack of formal training is being offset through professional development or informal learning, but we are far from seeing digital media literacy as a norm. This challenge is exacerbated by the fact that digital literacy is less about tools and more about thinking, and thus skills and standards based on tools and platforms have proven to be ephemeral.
  • To the audience:  do you see any trends that we should dig deeper into as a part of our research?
  • p. 69 ECAR
  • To the audience:  do you see any trends that we should dig deeper into as a part of our research?
  • Transcript

    • 1.  
    • 2.
      • Information Literacy as Metaliteracy
      • Critical Challenges
      • Technologies to Watch
    • 3.  
    • 4.
      • To use information ethically?
      • To evaluate information?
      • To navigate the research process effectively?
      • To choose the right technology for a particular project?
      • To create new, critically relevant online projects that can be socially shared with others?
      … and what is your role in this process?
    • 5.  
    • 6.
      • Internalized searching / evaluation skills
      • Deep technology fluency
      • Knowledge building
      • Reflection and self-assessment
      • Understanding of ethical use of information
    • 7.
      • “ Metaliteracy promotes critical thinking and collaboration in a digital age, providing a comprehensive framework to effectively participate in social media
      • and online communities .”
      • (Jacobson & Mackey)
    • 8.
      • New Metaliteracy Skills:
      • Understanding privacy, information ethics, and intellectual property issues.
      • Learning how to share information in a participatory environment.
    • 9. M E T A L I T E R C Y Access Determine Share Produce Social Media Social Media Social Media Social Media Evaluate Incorporate Understand Use INFORMATION LITERACY Taken from: Mackey, Tom. Collaborative Transliteracies in Open, Mobile, and Online Learning
    • 10. Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E.Jacobson Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy. College & Research Libraries. January 2011 72:62-78.
    • 11. www.nmc.org/pdf/2011-Horizon-Report-K12.pdf Sense-making and the ability to assess the credibility of information are paramount.
    • 12. www.nmc.org/pdf/2011-Horizon-Report-K12.pdf The abundance of resources and relationships made easily accessible via the Internet is increasingly challenging us to revisit our roles as educators.
    • 13. www.nmc.org/pdf/2011-Horizon-Report-K12.pdf Digital media literacy continues its rise in importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession.
    • 14. www.nmc.org/pdf/2011-Horizon-Report-K12.pdf Digital media literacy is less about tools and more about thinking.
    • 15.  
    • 16. Image taken from:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-1246721/Apple-iPad-revolutionise-way-travel.html
    • 17.  
    • 18.  
    • 19. ECAR 2010 Findings Students using cloud-based resources in their coursework: Google Docs: 36% Wikis: 33% Social Networking sites: 29% College-related review / opinion sites: 27% Lowest usage was virtual worlds at 1.4%
    • 20.  
    • 21. ECAR 2010 Findings Almost 2/3 of respondents own an Internet-capable mobile device. Among mobile owners, 43% use it daily to access the Web. 3% own an e-reader
    • 22.  
    • 23. ECAR 2010 Findings 94% access the university library web site weekly 90% access social networking sites daily Eight of ten students rate themselves as expert or very skilled on searching the Internet effectively and efficiently. Strong association between high technology and information literacy skills and technology adoption
    • 24.  
    • 25.  

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