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Chapter 3
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Transcript

  • 1. CHAPTER 3 Financial Statements, Cash Flow, and Taxes
    • Key Financial Statements
      • Balance sheet
      • Income statements
      • Statement of retained earnings
      • Statement of cash flows
    • Accounting income vs. cash flow
    • Federal tax system
  • 2. Video: Olson Smart Finance
  • 3. The annual report
    • Balance sheet – provides a snapshot of a firm’s financial position at one point in time.
    • Income statement – summarizes a firm’s revenues and expenses over a given period of time.
    • Statement of retained earnings – shows how much of the firm’s earnings were retained, rather than paid out as dividends.
    • Statement of cash flows – reports the impact of a firm’s activities on cash flows over a given period of time.
  • 4. Balance sheet: Assets
    • Cash
    • A/R
    • Inventories
    • Total CA
    • Gross FA
    • Less: Dep.
    • Net FA
    • Total Assets
    2005 7,282 632,160 1,287,360 1,926,802 1,202,950 263,160 939,790 2,866,592 2004 57,600 351,200 715,200 1,124,000 491,000 146,200 344,800 1,468,800
  • 5. Balance sheet: Liabilities and Equity
    • Accts payable
    • Notes payable
    • Accruals
    • Total CL
    • Long-term debt
    • Common stock
    • Retained earnings
    • Total Equity
    • Total L & E
    2005 524,160 636,808 489,600 1,650,568 723,432 460,000 32,592 492,592 2,866,592 2004 145,600 200,000 136,000 481,600 323,432 460,000 203,768 663,768 1,468,800
  • 6. Income statement
    • Sales
    • COGS
    • Other expenses
    • EBITDA
    • Depr. & Amort.
    • EBIT
    • Interest Exp.
    • EBT
    • Taxes
    • Net income
    2005 6,034,000 5,528,000 519,988 (13,988) 116,960 (130,948) 136,012 (266,960) (106,784) (160,176) 2004 3,432,000 2,864,000 358,672 209,328 18,900 190,428 43,828 146,600 58,640 87,960
  • 7. Other data
    • No. of shares
    • EPS
    • DPS
    • Stock price
    • Lease pmts
    2005 100,000 -$1.602 $0.11 $2.25 $40,000 2004 100,000 $0.88 $0.22 $8.50 $40,000
  • 8. Statement of Retained Earnings (2005)
    • Balance of retained
    • earnings, 12/31/04
    • Add: Net income, 2005
    • Less: Dividends paid
    • Balance of retained
    • earnings, 12/31/05
    $203,768 (160,176) (11,000) $32,592
  • 9. Statement of Cash Flows (2005)
    • OPERATING ACTIVITIES
    • Net income
    • Add (Sources of cash):
    • Depreciation
    • Increase in A/P
    • Increase in accruals
    • Subtract (Uses of cash):
    • Increase in A/R
    • Increase in inventories
    • Net cash provided by ops.
    (160,176) 116,960 378,560 353,600 (280,960) (572,160) (164,176)
  • 10. Statement of Cash Flows (2005)
    • L-T INVESTING ACTIVITIES
    • Investment in fixed assets
    • FINANCING ACTIVITIES
    • Increase in notes payable
    • Increase in long-term debt
    • Payment of cash dividend
    • Net cash from financing
    • NET CHANGE IN CASH
    • Plus: Cash at beginning of year
    • Cash at end of year
    (711,950) 436,808 400,000 (11,000) 825,808 (50,318) 57,600 7,282
  • 11. What can you conclude about D’Leon’s financial condition from its statement of CFs?
    • Net cash from operations = -$164,176, mainly because of negative NI.
    • The firm borrowed $825,808 to meet its cash requirements.
    • Even after borrowing, the cash account fell by $50,318.
  • 12. Did the expansion create additional net operating after taxes (NOPAT)?
    • NOPAT = EBIT (1 – Tax rate)
    • NOPAT 05 = -$130,948(1 – 0.4)
    • = -$130,948(0.6)
    • = -$78,569
    • NOPAT 04 = $114,257
  • 13. What effect did the expansion have on net cash flow and operating cash flow?
    • NCF 05 = NI + Dep = ($160,176) + $116,960
    • = -$43,216
    • NCF 04 = $87,960 + $18,900 = $106,860
    • OCF 05 = NOPAT + Depreciation and amortization
    • = ($78,569) + $116,960
    • = $38,391
    • OCF 04 = $114,257 + $18,900
    • = $133,157
  • 14. What was the free cash flow (FCF) for 2005?
    • FCF 05 = [-$130,948(1 – 0.4) + $116,960] –
    • [($1,202,950 – $491,000) + $70,642]
    • = -$744,201
    • Is negative free cash flow always a bad sign?
  • 15. Economic value added (EVA)
    • EVA = NOPAT – Annual dollar cost of capital
    • In order to generate positive EVA, a firm has to more than just cover operating costs. It must also provide a return to those who have provided the firm with capital.
    • EVA takes into account the total cost of capital, which includes the cost of equity.
  • 16. What is the firm’s EVA? Assume the firm’s after-tax percentage cost of capital was 10% in 2004 and 13% in 2005.
    • EVA 05 = NOPAT – (A-T cost of capital) (Capital)
    • = -$78,569 – (0.13)($1,852,832)
    • = -$78,569 – $240,868
    • = -$319,437
    • EVA 04 = $114,257 – (0.10)($1,187,200)
    • = $114,257 – $118,720
    • = -$4,463