Graduate students as authors
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Graduate students as authors

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Publishing a thesis is your first entry into the world of scholarly publishing. Learn about your copy-rights and opportunities as a new author.

Publishing a thesis is your first entry into the world of scholarly publishing. Learn about your copy-rights and opportunities as a new author.

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  • -publication of theses likely first experience as author > exciting time to be entering world of scholarly production > revolutionary era with control of content passing from publishers back to the hands of authors-being informed about the thesis publication process at Brock will equip you to pursue fair treatment of your work as you move into the wider world of academic publishing
  • So this refers to the fact that your research will live online – forever.
  • Canadian universities voluntarily submit graduate theses and dissertations to Theses Canada
  • The relation between video game violence and aggression. Adachi, Paul. 2011.
  • Can see big growth in repositories via OpenDOAR,a searchable database of subject and institutional respositories maintained at the Centre for Research Communications at the University of Nottingham.Useful for faculty and students: can look for subject repostories; contents searchable (eg War of 1812 Brock)
  • So what can you do:-at the very least, read the agreement before you sign, so you know what you’re getting into-research copyright agreements before you decide where to publish-negotiate – publishing is a two-way arrangement – they want your work (to make money from it) and you want exposure for your work. Why not try to leverage your rights for a better deal?-consider publishing with an Open Access publication, where you retain all rights as an author
  • --Each entry provides a summary of the publisher's policy, including what version of an article can be deposited, where it can be deposited, and any conditions attached--Journal titles are gathered from publishers' websites and supplemented with by feeds from the British Library's Zetocservice, DOAJ, and Entrez.at are attached to that deposit.-if you can’t find your journal, try searching for the publisher instead
  • SHERPA/ROMEO helps you find out about your existing rights afforded by journal publishersBut, based on the premise that there is give and take involved in publishing, there are ways you can try to negotiate a better deal – a compromise that balances the publisher’s business interests against your interests as an authorSPARC – international alliance of academic and research libraries-developed by SPARC in co-operation with Creative Commons & Science Commons
  • CC makes it easy for creators to assign specific rights to themselves and users-also a searchable database of open, shareable content

Graduate students as authors   Graduate students as authors Presentation Transcript

  • Dead tree, by 55Laney69 http://www.flickr.com/photos/42875184@N08/8654332095 Graduate students as authors Laurie Morrison, Head of Liaison Services Elizabeth Yates, Liaison/Scholarly Communication Librarian James A. Gibson Library March 12, 2014
  • 2 Your research WILL have a digital life. You have the opportunity to control that life. -- Micah Vandegrift, Scholarly Communications Librarian @ Florida State University
  • Copyright: What is it? Why does it matter? • a form of intellectual property • applies to all genres – books, periodicals, charts, software, films, music, works of art • Protects your rights as a creator: – to reproduce, publish, alter, sell, etc. the work – copyright infringement > is unauthorized copying or use of a work
  • Copyright & theses @ Brock • Graduate Studies sets academic policies and requirements • All theses submitted electronically • Library disseminates & preserves theses • Process: – Sign Brock University Thesis and Major Research Paper Copyright Licence – Sign Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Non- Exclusive License to Reproduce Theses – Submit a digital copy to Brock’s Digital Repository
  • Brock University Thesis and Major Research Paper Copyright Licence • https://brocku.ca/webfm_send/26503 • authors retain copyright > copyright notice displays on title page • Brock gets “non-exclusive, royalty-free, perpetual, worldwide licence” to preserve work in digital repository, make work available to others via interlibrary loan, provide work to LAC Theses Canada, provide work to third-party theses databases
  • Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Non-Exclusive Licence to Reproduce Theses • http://www.brocku.ca/webfm_send/16900 “This form is an agreement between you (the thesis author) and LAC that gives LAC permission to include your thesis in the Theses Canada program. Because the licence is non-exclusive you can pursue any other publishing venture that you wish. The licence clearly indicates that you retain ownership of the copyright and moral rights on your thesis.”
  • Brock Digital Repository http://dr.library.brocku.ca/handle/10464/1147 • Your work is visible to the world • Indexed in Google Scholar, SuperSearch, etc. • Statistics for views
  • OpenDOAR opendoar.org Image: 'Dolmabahçe Palace...' http://www.flickr.com/photos/37134982@N00/1266859025 Found on flickrcc.net
  • After Brock: Protect your copyrights White clouds in the deep blue, by backtrust; from stock.xchng No. 1 > Read your copyright agreements! -research your publication options -negotiate a better deal -use Creative Commons -publish with an Open Access platform
  • SHERPA/RoMEO • searchable database of publishers’ policies regarding copyright and online archiving • Why? -- research CR policies before you sign – web archiving = more citations – to comply with funding policies – http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/
  • SPARC Addendum • SPARC: Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition • www.sparc.arl.org/resources/authors/addendum • SPARC Author Addendum is a legal instrument that modifies the publisher’s agreement and allows you to keep key rights to your articles
  • SPARC addendum • Key points: – Addendum paramount – Author retains all rights for re-use; journal gets credit – Author gets copy of final article
  • Consider CC licensing • Creative Commons licences: – Range of protections and permissions CC on Light by Yamashita Yohei
  • Publishing resources • Your librarian • Guidelines for evaluating a journal/publisher • Checklist to ID reputable publishers • Beall’s list of Predatory Publishers
  • Summing up 'The Road to Tomorrow (and Happy 2009!)' http://www.flickr.com/photos/95572727@N00/3155662908 Found on flickrcc.net Questions? Elizabeth – eyates@brocku.ca Laurie – lmorrison@brocku.ca